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Recap: Good shots the key to Jayhawks' win over Ohio State

Note: Here is a listing of definitions for some terms used in this blog. Also, feel free to ask questions in the comments section below if something doesn't make sense.

Kansas turned it over on more than a fourth of its possessions but still had a great day offensively against No. 2 Ohio State in a 78-67 victory on Saturday.

Kansas forward Justin Wesley celebrates a dunk against Ohio State during the first half Saturday, Dec. 10, 2011 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas forward Justin Wesley celebrates a dunk against Ohio State during the first half Saturday, Dec. 10, 2011 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

The Jayhawks scored 1.11 points per possession — the highest PPP against Ohio State's defense in the Buckeyes' last 15 games.

So how did KU do it?

The simple answer is that the Jayhawks shot the ball well, though like most things, the answer is more complex if you want it to be.

Kansas guards Tyshawn Taylor (10) and Travis Releford (24) high five as the Jayhawks wrap up the game against Ohio State with seconds remaining in regulation.

Kansas guards Tyshawn Taylor (10) and Travis Releford (24) high five as the Jayhawks wrap up the game against Ohio State with seconds remaining in regulation. by Nick Krug

KU had its best shooting game of the season, posting an effective field goal percentage of 67.7 percent — the fifth-best mark in its last two seasons.

The last time a team shot better than 67.7 eFG% against Ohio State was three seasons ago: Dec. 31, 2008, to be exact.

While the Jayhawks did pick a good game to make a lot of shots, they also deserve credit for getting great shots against the Buckeyes.

That becomes most apparent when you look at the shot charts from the game.

Though it might be unspoken, the goal for most teams should be either to get close twos or open threes.

From the shot charts above, it looks like KU only took five two-pointers from outside the lane — a low number considering KU had 48 field-goal attempts in all.

Yes, KU had a good shooting percentage, but the Jayhawks also helped themselves quite a bit by getting the ball in places where they had a great chance to be efficient offensively.

M.O.J. (Most Outstanding Jayhawk)

Offensively, Kevin Young was the Jayhawks' best and most consistent player.

The junior posted 1.44 points per possession used while ending 16.6 percent of KU's possessions while he was in.

Young also showed the ability to hit from the outside, making 2 of 3 three-pointers to go with his 6-for-8 shooting overall.

His effective field-goal percentage of 87.5 percent was second on the team (among players with more than one shot), while he also grabbed 7.5 percent of the available offensive rebounds and 12.8 percent of the available defensive rebounds while he was in.

Kansas forward Kevin Young flashes a smile after taking a charge against an Ohio State player during the first half Saturday, Dec. 10, 2011 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas forward Kevin Young flashes a smile after taking a charge against an Ohio State player during the first half Saturday, Dec. 10, 2011 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

KU coach Bill Self also was pleased after the game with Young's effort defensively against 6-foot-7 Deshaun Thomas.

“Kevin probably had as much to do with us winning the game as anything,” Self said. “He scored points for us, but he did a great job on Thomas the second half. Great job.”

Once Young checked in for the final time with 16:01 left, Thomas made just 1 of 4 shots the rest of the way.

Young's extended playing time did appear to come at a cost. The Jayhawks' second-half defensive rebounding seemed to suffer with Jeff Withey not playing as much (eight second-half minutes), as the Buckeyes had nine second-half offensive rebounds after grabbing five in the first half.

Kansas center Jeff Withey knocks away a pass intended for Ohio State guard Aaron Craft during the first half Saturday, Dec. 10, 2011 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas center Jeff Withey knocks away a pass intended for Ohio State guard Aaron Craft during the first half Saturday, Dec. 10, 2011 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

The Jayhawks also saw a dramatic change in their two-point defense in the second half.

Ohio State 2-point shooting
First half — 4-for-16 (25 percent)
Second half — 15-for-29 (51.7 percent)

There's no way to pin any of this on one player, and Young certainly should be not be faulted for defense that was lauded by Self.

It's important to point out, though, that taking Withey out of the game has the potential to affect KU in other areas that might be not immediately apparent.

Room for Improvement

Defensive rebounding and turnovers were about the only areas that could be nitpicked after the Jayhawks' 11-point victory.

Travis Releford (24) lands on the floor during a loose ball scramble during the first-half of the Jayhawks game against #2 nationally ranked Ohio State University at Allen Field House, Dec. 10, 2011. ..

Travis Releford (24) lands on the floor during a loose ball scramble during the first-half of the Jayhawks game against #2 nationally ranked Ohio State University at Allen Field House, Dec. 10, 2011. .. by Mike Yoder

Ohio State came away with 35.9 percent of the available offensive rebounds against KU — the second-most by a KU opponent this season.

Also, KU turned it over 25.7 percent of the time against OSU, and while that is high, it's still not as high as the Buckeyes' opponents are averaging this season (27.5 percent).

Tyshawn Taylor, Robinson and Conner Teahan all led KU in turnover rate, with each player giving it away on 33 percent of their used possessions.

Tough-Luck Line

Teahan takes the "Tough-Luck Line" after a poor shooting game.

The Jayhawks huddle around head coach Bill Self late in the game against  Long Beach State on Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2011 at Allen Fieldhouse.

The Jayhawks huddle around head coach Bill Self late in the game against Long Beach State on Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2011 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

The senior posted a team-low 0.78 points per possession while ending 19 percent of the possessions he was in there.

The sharpshooter made just 1 of 5 three-pointers while struggling with a tough defensive assignment.

Though Teahan's defense has improved this year, he wasn't quick enough to stay with future pro William Buford, who routinely went by him on the dribble. In fact, twice after Buford scored against Teahan, Self immediately went to his bench to sub Travis Releford back in.

The game also ended a hot-shooting streak for Teahan at Allen Fieldhouse. Coming into the game, the Leawood native had made 11 of 20 three-pointers taken in the building this season (55 percent).

Bottom Line

Shooting percentages were the biggest difference in KU's 11-point victory over OSU.

KU coach Bill Self and assistant coach Kurtis Townsen react to a basket by Thomas Robinson who also drew a foul on the play, during the second-half of the Jayhawks 78-67 win over #2 nationally ranked Ohio State University at Allen Fieldhouse, Dec. 10, 2011. ..

KU coach Bill Self and assistant coach Kurtis Townsen react to a basket by Thomas Robinson who also drew a foul on the play, during the second-half of the Jayhawks 78-67 win over #2 nationally ranked Ohio State University at Allen Fieldhouse, Dec. 10, 2011. .. by Mike Yoder

Not only did the Jayhawks have their best shooting day of the year, they also held OSU to 42.7 eFG% shooting (second-worst this season). The Buckeyes' 0.96 points per possessions also were a season low.

Though KU's high turnover number isn't a good sign, those miscues can be more easily forgiven when the Jayhawks run their offense as effectively and efficiently as they did on Saturday.

Comments

phi4life940 2 years, 11 months ago

Booooooooo Turnovers! If we have less than 10 turnovers in a game, I think we are close to unbeatable.

justanotherfan 2 years, 11 months ago

I agree, unfortunately because our offense is dependent on either Tyshawn or EJ creating off the dribble, or TRob and Withey in the post where they are still learning to deal with double teams, I think we are going to be a high turnover team all year. I think the goal is to get them under 15, and limit the TOs in the open floor and on entry passes sailing out of bounds. That should make us pretty tough.

jaymar74 2 years, 11 months ago

we will never have less than 10 turnovers in any game, we play to attack not sit back. Our style leads to more turnovers than most teams, a good game for us is 12-14 turnovers. The 2008 team never had less than 10 turnovers in a game.

actorman 2 years, 11 months ago

I don't think the biggest problem is the number of turnovers; it's the type of turnovers. It's the unforced errors that are so frustrating, and that's what hopefully will improve as the season progresses.

Mike Kendall 2 years, 11 months ago

I knew we had a good offensive game with a simple "eye ball" test. I just didn't know how we stood on the defensive side of the ball. Jesse, your analysis always soothes the anxiety of lot of folks from Jayhawk Nation---thanks!

Ben Kane 2 years, 11 months ago

jesse,

how about some analysis about our efficiency (or lack thereof) on fast breaks this season.

Jesse Newell 2 years, 11 months ago

Seems like this would be tough to do with the stats we have now. Plus, "fast breaks" can be subjective, so this be tough to look at that without going through tons and tons of film.

whitechocolate 2 years, 11 months ago

Dude, how do you watch the game, keep track of shooting spots, statistics, and make good-natured responses to the message board in real time? Interns? Elves?

Jesse Newell 2 years, 11 months ago

Ha. Actually, the shot chart is provided by KU Athletics. They give them out with the box score after the game.

Kevin Crook 2 years, 11 months ago

I think this team can play with anyone...the good teams and unfortunately down to the bad teams. We are thin on the front line compared to most of Self's teams, which tells me Coach didn't expect Traylor to be ineligible. If Withey and Young continue to step up big and play consistently, combined with The Prophet and Releford adding scoring to TT and T Rob, we can be tough to beat. I LOVE me some Self when he can coach as an underdog, BEST IN THE COUNTRY!

jaybate 2 years, 11 months ago

Helluva nice, concise break down.

Suggestion: include the opponent's first and second half shot charts and readers will instantly understand the game.

Second Suggestion: A really, really cool app would be a software with a touch wand that allows you to just tap the screen showing both ends of the court. The software records the location and time of the shot and you circle for make. Then the file is saved by you at each time out. And restarted when play resumes. The incredibly cool part of the app is that it both counts the shots by trey and 2 point shots, and lets you replay it after the game at accelerated speed so you get a quick visual of where and how the shots were unfolding temporally, not just specially.

Post this feed with each of your stories and you are the gold standard.

Jesse Newell 2 years, 11 months ago

Can't help you with the animated shot chart yet, but here are Ohio State's first and second half shot charts, in case you wanted to see them. I count 17 two-point attempts from outside the lane.

First half ...

http://twitpic.com/7sm24b

Second half ...

http://twitpic.com/7sm0co

AsadZ 2 years, 11 months ago

Jesse, Great analysis. I had not thought about Jeff's impact on D (two pointers by OSU) until I read this article. Many thanks.

jayhawker_97 2 years, 11 months ago

[quote]It's important to point out, though, that taking Withey out of the game has the potential to affect KU in other areas that might be not immediately apparent. [quote]

i didn't realize till now. that's probably why they got 15 offensive rebounds. so, put Withey & Young together, we might see a blown-out!!

Curtis Stutz 2 years, 11 months ago

Looks like Def Reb% was probably similar from the first to second half, looks like 38 second half FGA compared to 24 FGA in the first half for OSU Also wonder how some bad offensive possessions by KU affected 2nd half 2pt FG% for OSU, as KU has had a tendency to throw away some possessions with a lead often resulting in fast breaks. I'm not discounting what Withey brings to the floor though, definitely alters/blocks shots and snags some good boards when he's in there. Pretty sure we actually gave up an offensive rebound because Withey and TRob were both getting after the defensive boards so well in the first half.

Jesse Newell 2 years, 11 months ago

Phogphan — Good point on using rebound percentages.

To get OSU's offensive rebounding percentage, we have to compare OSU's offensive rebounds to KU's defensive rebounds each half.

First half — OSU 5 OR, KU 12 DR, so 5/17= 29.4 percent. Second half — OSU 9 OR, KU 13 DR, so 9/22= 40.9 percent.

As you can see, even if we use Off. Reb. percentage, the Buckeyes were significantly better on the offensive glass in the second half.

Curtis Stutz 2 years, 11 months ago

Good point Jesse, I didn't have the info to look closely enough at it. Under 30% vs over 40% definitely the difference between an excellent defensive rebounding team and a poor one.

Curtis Stutz 2 years, 11 months ago

At times I felt like we didn't take enough advantage of TRob with no Sullinger, but I'm also happy to see us not lean too heavily on him and have other guys step up, take and make shots. Being too reliant on TRob makes our offense predictable. Hopefully guys will keep taking shots and know that if we really need a basket or a crunch time shot TRob is hungry for the rock.

Michael Luby 2 years, 11 months ago

If those guys play the conference like they did Ohio St last night, they will win the conference, no doubt.

Michael Luby 2 years, 11 months ago

Where's the game day Cram Session you guys? Its only 4 hours till tip off... wtf?

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