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Sunday, April 20, 2014

Bill Self to visit Texas prep Turner

Kansas University basketball recruiting.

Kansas University basketball recruiting.

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Kansas University basketball coach Bill Self will meet with blue-chip high school prospect Myles Turner today in Texas, several recruiting sites have reported.

Turner, a 6-foot-11, 225-pound senior center from Trinity High in Euless, Texas, made the trip to Brooklyn, N.Y., but did not play in Friday’s Jordan Brand Classic because of an ankle injury.

Turner says he will announce for KU, Texas, SMU, Oklahoma State, Ohio State, Duke or Texas A&M; on April 30 on ESPNU. Turner is ranked No. 6 nationally by Rivals.com.

Yakwe interested: KU is recruiting Kassoum Yakwe, a 6-7, 200-pound sophomore forward from Our Savior New American High in Centereach, N.Y., Zagsblog.com reports.

Yakwe scored 13 points and grabbed two rebounds in the Jordan Brand Classic international game Friday in New York. He was 2-of-3 from three.

Yakwe, who missed two months of this past season because of a broken hand, told Zagsblog he is also being recruited by Villanova and Syracuse at this early date.

Camp news from Cole: Former KU center Cole Aldrich of the New York Knicks will host a youth basketball camp for boys and girls, kindergarten through high school sophomore July 7-10 at Robinson Gymnasium on KU’s campus. For details go to www.colealdrich.com

Hill to Va. Tech: Ahmed Hill, a 6-4 shooting guard from Aquinas High in Augusta, Ga., who had originally committed to Marquette, has followed coach Buzz Williams to Virginia Tech. Hill, who is ranked No. 69 nationally by Rivals.com, had KU on his original list of schools.

Comments

Suzi Marshall 5 years, 7 months ago

I bet there are not many in-home recruiting trips that a head coach will make on an Easter Sunday. Is Self brining the Easter Bunny with him?

With 10 days remaining on the Turner clock, it sounds like the Turners plans to give each of the coaches from the schools under consideration a last shot. If that means anywhere from 3-7 coaches visiting Turner's Euless home this week, being first visit may not be the best selection. Nevertheless, an Easter visit has to be unique and special.

Good luck Coach.

Jeff Kilgore 5 years, 7 months ago

If we get Turner, I'll believe in the Easter Bunny!

Suzi Marshall 5 years, 7 months ago

If Self lands Turner they should combine to do a skit for "Late Night."

They can have a big cowboy hat at mid-court. Self should come out dressed as "The Wizard of Oz." With The Steve Miller band playing "Abracadabra," Self does some wand waving. At the appropriate time Turner should pop out dressed as "The Easter Bunny." Truly Self will be pulling a rabbit out of the has, or somewhere else, if he signs Turner. I'm not sure if Turner would like the nickname of "The Easter Bunny."

For those that don't know, here is the link to them playing "Abracadabra."

www.youtube.com/watch?v=vWPQQbldFjw

Rodney Crain 5 years, 7 months ago

I agree being first is not ideal. On the other hand being it Easter, if you are the recruit that has to say something to you about how serious the school is. One of the many things I do like about Self is he is upfront and honest with these young men too. They know from him they are getting the straight deal. I also like that Joel reached out to Turner as well. Other schools might be doing that too, but if I were in his position I would like to hear from somebody my age who just went through what my next year would be like.

Tony Bandle 5 years, 7 months ago

Actually, this may be the key visit for Myles whereby Myles and his family can now realistically discuss the "Post-Embiid" era at KU with HCBS and what Myles role could now become.

I agree with Suzi...to get an in-house invite on Easter Sunday strikes me as significant....in a good way for KU!!

Tony Bandle 5 years, 7 months ago

PS Also, one unique option KU has in our pockets is that we already have two 1st team high school All Americans coming in...there will be considerably less pressure on Myles as opposed to going to a school to be "the Man"!!

Mike Riches 5 years, 7 months ago

In other news, sounds like change is on the horizon:

http://espn.go.com/nba/story/_/id/10803355/adam-silver-says-pushing-back-nba-age-limit-top-priority

I can see nothing but good (for KU basketball that is) coming from a change in the NBA age limit. Imagine the difference in recruiting top talent, knowing they'll be here for at least two years! It may be that Coach Self is starting to get "top-tier recruits" at just the right time...

Happy Easter! :)

Jeff Kilgore 5 years, 7 months ago

I'd be okay with pushing back the age limit to two years as long as these kids can go directly to the NBA and then if they fail, attend three years of school as a reminder that they need more playing/maturity.

Benz Junque 5 years, 7 months ago

This comment was removed by the site staff for violation of the usage agreement.

Rodney Crain 5 years, 7 months ago

Not so sure how this would all play out, in the article -

"Some have suggested that players who must wait two years to enter the draft would be better off playing in other professional leagues such as the NBA Development League, which doesn't have an age limit, or going overseas".

"I'm reading and listening to college players and the other side saying development may be better outside the NBA or the environment isn't ideal in college," Silver said. "I think those are all things we have to look at."

Also Silver discussed changes the NBA would want in the college game too. Which I would like, but others might not.

So we should be careful what we wish for. Imagine most/all of the top talent coming out of high school going right into the NBA development league for two years. Maybe the ESPN Top 25-50 players each year. This is what it might take to get the players in the NBA to amend the CBA to raise the limit. I hope they come up with a better solution that works for both the college and NBA. The level of play in the college game would suffer with top players bypassing college.

Mike Riches 5 years, 7 months ago

The NBADL would have a long way to go before it would present any real competition for College Basketball. Currently there is no national exposure, and the average salary is $12-24,000. Even if the NBA were to put a lot of money into the DL, which is the idea being floated, it would most likely not be 25-50 players going "semi-pro" each year. There are only 17 teams and they are full of players with years of experience playing college and professional basketball. They are much more likely to be on an NBA roster next year than the 35th ranked player coming out of high-school.

But to your point, perhaps the top talent (10-15 players) does go somewhere else for two years (international etc.). But I really don't think that would hurt college basketball. If anything it levels the playing field, and promotes multi-year player development, where KU excels. That's why I say, I don't see how this could be bad for Kansas basketball.

Mike Riches 5 years, 7 months ago

Also, I'm with you that I think some of the changes they're discussing (shorter shot clock etc.) would be fun to see in the college game, but you're right that not everyone would feel that way.

Benz Junque 5 years, 7 months ago

This comment was removed by the site staff for violation of the usage agreement.

Rodney Crain 5 years, 7 months ago

Mike and Benz you are missing the point, the NBA players have to OK any change to the CBA on this specific issue. Currently they are not going to approve anything different without some changes. Those changes are some that I listed from the article that Mr. Silver is talking about. If they push that player development is better in the D League or that you need to play out of country to get drafted higher, and the league backs that up then that is where the players are going to go.
Lets say they go that direction, and the league drafts mostly, 85%, from the D League or Out of Country instead of mostly from the college ranks, the players will go where they have the best chance to get drafted, or to be developed to get drafted. even if the pay is 12-24k think about a talented HS player, no class's, I play basketball and get some money, not big money but a lot more than in college and I get to work on my game for 2 years, prob. with a nice Insurance policy. If that is the path to get to the NBA they will follow it.

I think what Mr. Silver is saying is everything is on the table and he is going to talk to everyone for this next move. I like that. I like all the changes they are talking about they want from college ball too. My point is that this next change might not be all that great for college ball.

Mike Riches 5 years, 7 months ago

Those are all reasons why the President of the NCAA Mark Emmert met with NBA owners last week. It's obvious that for the players to accept changes in the CBA, that there will need to be changes, and it appears that the NCAA realizes it will need to embrace change if it wants to continue to recruit top talent. I mentioned a few of those ideas below in response to Walter, but I think the change that makes the most sense is allowing players to receive profits from jersey sales, and maybe even endorsement deals.

College basketball is already in a good position to continue getting top talent, with multi-year TV deals already providing national exposure, records crowds at the Final Four this year, great coaching and development, etc. It's true that the NCAA could choose to be so stubborn that they don't accept any change, but from what I've read and heard, it doesn't seem like that's what's happening.

The other thing to consider is that NBA Players may not push back on this issue as strongly as one might think. Yes they represent player's best interests including incoming players, but seasoned players don't benefit from OAD players who fizzle in the NBA. It really is in everyone's best interest to get rid of this rule.

Rodney Crain 5 years, 7 months ago

Mike there are a lot of ways this could go and everybody is talking about how to do it, but if the NBA decides to go in a direction that does not benefit the College game, like bringing the top talent in, and push the dead weight out of the NBADL. All of the sudden they could create a NBADL TV deal, increase pay for all DL players, allow all promotional money like endorsement deals, and now they have a compelling option for 25-50 players each year. Everything is on the table and Mr. Silver appears to be smart guy and the owners are ready to make a change. The players are going to be looking for ways this benefits them. All under the guise of player development. They seem to like CB and I think they want to work out a deal that works for all, but if they take this in house it will hurt the college game. Your point about what college basketball has, is the main money point that will come up in their discussion. How they can get a piece of it. Your other point is exactly why they would want to take player development in house. In addition when OAD's fizzle existing players get to keep their starting jobs, which is why this is delicate for the players. The existing players will want to make sure they are protected. What is a hot topic right now btw in College athletics, how to compensate the athletes? Unions? Meal money? etc... The NBA might have an interesting option for basketball players coming out of high school.

Mike Riches 5 years, 7 months ago

Rodney, you're making the NBA sound like a revenue producing business, looking to increase profits wherever possible...wait a second, that's exactly what they are. :)

We can beat this to death, but at the end of the day you're right, it could go a lot of ways. I just think it's the NCAA's deal to lose (recruiting top talent that is.)

The other thing that the NBA has to consider is that there are millions of faithful college basketball fans (like you and me) out there. Kids coming through college brings some of those fans' attention and revenue to the NBA. For example, I tend to cheer for teams where KU players play a predominant role. If Wiggins had played for the D-League this past year, I wouldn't have cared one bit about that, but since he wore a KU jersey, I will certainly pay more attention to his pro career (though admittedly I would feel more attached if he stayed two years or more.) If he comes through Dallas, where I live, I'll pay to go to a Mavs game to watch him play. This is really only true with the top 20 or so players each year, since they are usually the only ones who get much playing time in the NBA (though there are certainly some exceptions). I don't know how much of an effect college fans have on the NBA's revenue, but like I said, it is something they will have to consider.

Rodney Crain 5 years, 7 months ago

When I first heard this I was excited, when I read the ESPN article I went oh oh this could get sideways fast. I hope it all works out but there is this ominous feeling when the new NBA commissioner makes statements like that. I hope he is doing it to gain some leverage or something like that. You are right I am not going to watch these players in the D league or anywhere else but in a KU uniform.

Rodney Crain 5 years, 7 months ago

one more thought, what if you can get shoe contract money in the DL or overseas?

Jonathan Allison 5 years, 7 months ago

Bingo. This is exactly what I was thinking. No amatuerism-shamatuerism if you're in pro-ball even if it's NBADL. You'll have an agent, you'll be available for promotions, marketing, the whole gamut. Imagine the promotions that Wiggins would have had this year had he not being tied down by amatuerism? His brand was HUGE coming out of HS. Look no further than SI, GQ, ESPN, etc. He could have made millions in promotions before he ever played a game.

Walter Bridges 5 years, 7 months ago

Mike, I think the rule change would be good for both the NBA and the NCAA but not so much for the player. You can join the Army at 18 (17 w/permission) but not the NBA?

It's 2 years of forced servitude to the NCAA. Two years of big money for the NCAA and an extra year of evaluation for the NBA.I bet more than a few kids will take their game overseas.

With that said, I still favor the rule. For the majority of the players, it gives them an additional year to mature physically and mentally but what happens if the player gets significantly injured? I think their needs to be some form of compensation if an expected lottery pick suffers a severe career jeopardizing injury.

I believe the ONE AND DONE to be the worst option to having either no min. age, OAD or two year wait but lets not forget the rights of the player to the big money NCAA & NBA.

Jack Wilson 5 years, 7 months ago

"It's 2 years of forced servitude to the NCAA."

No, it's a choice. No one has to sign on the dotted line. If they think they are in servitude, perhaps they can apply for $8 an hour job at McDonald's and compare their plight.

Walter Bridges 5 years, 7 months ago

Of course they don't HEM, but what are the repercussions of not signing? Do you think the NCAA and NBA put the best interests of the player first before considering the financial bottom line of this agreement?

If you don't think the the NCAA makes a lot of money off these players who they know are not at the institution for a degree, you are not nearly as smart as I've believed you to be.

As I said, I think this is the best option for the majority but I don't think any of these options are all that great.

"perhaps they can apply for $8 an hour job at McDonald's and compare their plight"

You really think there aren't other choices? College or McDonalds? You set the bar pretty low for these kids. Maybe they should sling crack for two years.

I don't see Wiggins sweeping out the cold storage or serving fries in whatever choice he would have made if he faced the possible new regulations. I do see the possibility of European and other pro leagues getting an influx of new talent who might be willing to sign multi-year contracts.

Walter Bridges 5 years, 7 months ago

HEM..just wanted to apologize for the slinging crack comment. It was an unwarranted low blow..

What I should have stated w/my comment was if the new proposed rule was in effect now, it would cost Wiggins and JoJo nearly $5 million dollars each next season while making KU an even bigger draw than they already are.

Jeff Kilgore 5 years, 7 months ago

Jack, when you're an adult at 18, you're an adult. If and when this decision gets to a court, the 18 year-olds will win. No group, no matter how well meaning, will be allowed to discriminate due to age. Age discrimination is illegal and will not be allowed in this instance in my opinion, whether right or wrong.

Rodney Crain 5 years, 7 months ago

They will not win. Already ruled on College FB like Raymond said below.

Mike Riches 5 years, 7 months ago

I agree with you Walter, that the players may be the ones not happy with an increase in the age limit. However, I don't think it's forced servitude to the NCAA. Even now, players have every right to play overseas instead of going to college (a la Brandon Jennings) but of course most prefer the perks of college, like free room and board, national media exposure, quality physical development and game development (great coaches), not to mention a free education and being treated like a rock star on campus at a place like KU.

Player compensation will have to be considered, as Rodney mentioned above, for the player's union to negotiate this. I've heard possible solutions like a flat player stipend or an insurance policy for players who do get injured paid for by the college and/or NCAA. The one that makes the most sense to me, is allowing players to receive compensation when their name/image/character is bringing in profits (jersey sales etc.) I personally think Andrew Wiggins totally deserves a percentage of the money that was spent on #22 jerseys this year. I'd even be ok with college athletes being allowed to sign endorsement deals, though I understand there are some who disagree with that.

However the details shake out, I'm just glad to see the NBA seriously pushing this agenda. I do think it will be much better for the college game, and like you said, the vast majority of college players.

Raymond Wright 5 years, 7 months ago

@jeff. The court had already ruled on the NFL and their 3 year rule. They ruled it is not discrimination which is how they would rule against 18 year olds suing the NBA.

Len Shaffer 5 years, 7 months ago

I believe the reason the court ruled in favor of the NFL was that it had been collectively agreed to with the players' union, so assuming that the NBA players' union agrees to a change, it would be the same situation.

Jeff Kilgore 5 years, 7 months ago

Which court? I hadn't heard about this. On radio, most analysts believe that the 18 year-olds will win this case, so my comments were really just parroting what I'd heard.

Jonathan Allison 5 years, 7 months ago

from Maurice Clarett's wikipedia page:

In his attempt to enter the 2004 NFL Draft, Clarett challenged the NFL's rule that a player must wait three years after graduating from High School to declare for the draft. Federal Judge Shira Scheindlin initially ruled based on anti-trust grounds that the NFL could not bar Clarett from participating in the 2004 NFL Draft.[7] This decision was later overturned by the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in an opinion by Judge Sonia Sotomayor, and Clarett's petition for certiorari was refused by the Supreme Court.[8] Clarett and USC wide receiver Mike Williams, who were both hoping to enter the draft early, were then barred from the draft by the NFL. Later, because they both signed agents before being denied the opportunity to join the NFL Draft, the NCAA refused to reinstate the college eligibility of Clarett or Williams.

Matthew Pyle 5 years, 7 months ago

My guess is we have better players coming off of our bench....

Ryan Zimmerman 5 years, 7 months ago

Who? Lucas? Traylor? Hunter who barely played at Arkansas? I can't imagine them being head and shoulders better than Turner.

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