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Originally published December 7, 2012 at 12:32p.m., updated December 8, 2012 at 12:19a.m.

Tait

Opinion: TV rights agreement ensures Big 12’s long-term stability

ESPN College Gameday's Rece Davis and Kansas head coach Bill Self scan the Allen Fieldhouse crowd prior to Self's interview on Saturday, Jan. 29, 2011 at Allen Fieldhouse.

ESPN College Gameday's Rece Davis and Kansas head coach Bill Self scan the Allen Fieldhouse crowd prior to Self's interview on Saturday, Jan. 29, 2011 at Allen Fieldhouse.

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Throughout Big 12 country, the conference’s “Grant of Rights” agreement has become the phrase du jour. But what does it mean, what does it do and why is it so important?

For starters, it’s the one thing out there that allows Big 12 officials to rest easy at night while the world of conference realignment continues to swirl around them.

The mere fact the Grant of Rights agreement exists is as close to a guarantee as you can get that the conference will be stable for at least the next 13 years. And if those of us who have followed Kansas University football closely throughout the years have learned anything, we know that instability does nothing to promote success.

In its most basic form, the Grant of Rights agreement is written permission by the 10 members of the Big 12 Conference to hand over control of their television rights to the conference for the agreed-upon term of 13 years. The agreement pertains only to the Tier 1 (ESPN/ABC and FOX national games) and Tier 2 (ESPN or FOX regional games) rights and does not include Tier 3 rights, which include endeavors such as The Longhorn Network, Jayhawk Network or any other broadcast produced by the individual schools.

Before we get too far into explaining this thing, it’s important to understand that both the Big Ten and Pac-12 also have Grant of Rights agreements and, because of that, one BCS conference official explained to the Journal-World, all three conferences should be less inclined to poach teams from one another.

“If any conference understands what Grant of Rights means, it’s the Big Ten,” the official said.

With that in mind, if the Big Ten were interested in snagging a school from the Big 12, or even the Pac-12, it would, or at least should, do so with the understanding that the move could weaken the whole GOR concept and, therein, make all three conferences more vulnerable.

Because of that, many within the Big 12 believe its members are as off limits as you can get in today’s world.

Interestingly enough, the SEC has neither a Grant of Rights agreement nor an exit penalty. The ACC, which continues to lose and add members, operates with an exit penalty of $50 million, an amount for which the conference is suing Maryland, which announced recently that it was joining the Big Ten. If the penalty is enforced, many believe the Big Ten will end up paying a large chunk of it to obtain Maryland.

Although there is no concrete dollar value tied to the Big 12’s Grant of Rights agreement, it has been estimated to hold a net worth of more than $250 million per school for the length of the 13-year contract.

Unlike exit fees, which are liquidated damages and can be negotiated in court and proven to be valid or invalid, the GOR agreement is not up for interpretation, according to a report written by Mit Winter of BuisnessofCollegeSports.com. It stands to reason then, that it is much more likely to hold up in court as a legitimate, enforceable contract.

There’s a reason the GOR is perceived by so many within the Big 12 to be a strong-as-oak statement about the members’ commitment to the conference. Not only does it make it tough for a school to leave, but it also makes it even tougher for another conference to open its arms to a Big 12 school.

“Granting of rights is not really a financial issue,” a Big 12 administrator said. “Money can be negotiated, but this issue is a lot more difficult because it affects more than just the member.”

If a team from the Big 12 were to move to the Big Ten in the next 13 years, the rights and, therefore the revenue (except Tier 3), for that Big 12 school’s home football and basketball games would belong to the Big 12, not the Big Ten. Such an occurrence could inspire the Big Ten’s television partners to seek to renegotiate their deal with the conference and could significantly damage the Big Ten’s business plan.

“I don’t think, at this point, that a conference would be willing to take a team if they don’t get their TV rights,” one Big 12 school administrator said. “So, if someone was interested in leaving, you’ve got a situation that really makes it difficult both for the institution and the conference they’re trying to go to.”

So what does all of this mean for Kansas? It’s simple. As has been the case throughout each round of conference realignment, KU’s best option, at both stability and financial gain, is remaining loyal to the Big 12. The GOR makes it nearly impossible for KU to entertain advances from other conferences, of which there seem to be none at the moment. Furthermore, the agreement makes KU far less desirable. Imagine if KU jumped to the Big Ten and played a football game against Michigan or Ohio State at Memorial Stadium and the Big Ten did not get a dime from it. Not happening.

So where does this leave the Big 12? Strong as is. Stronger than ever.

Considering the value of the Big 12’s current TV contracts, along with the revenue that is soon to come as a result of the conference’s partnership with the SEC that created the Champions Bowl, each member of the Big 12 is looking at a guaranteed take of nearly $30 million per year for the length of the contracts.

That sets the bar awfully high for the Big 12 to even entertain the idea of expanding.

“If you’re thinking about taking two schools you’ve gotta go to your TV partners and say, ‘We’re taking these two schools in; we want $60 million more.’ It ain’t gonna happen,” a Big 12 administrator said.

Why not?

Because most high-ranking officials within the Big 12 don’t believe that any schools out there are worth that kind of money.

And why not?

Because that’s what the television partners say.

Comments

mahkmood 1 year, 4 months ago

Just read some stuff about Big East BB schools wanting to separate from the rest of the conf. I'm wondering if the Big12 TV network is even possible. How much TV market share would need to be added? What if the Big12 absorbed what remains of the Big East, and adds Army and Navy? Would that be enough for a Big12 TV network? How much revenue per school? Just my curious thoughts...

FOOTBALL: North: ISU WVU KU KSU Cinci UConn Temple (Philly Market) Navy (D.C. Market)

South: UT TT OU TCU Baylor OSU USF (Tampa Market) Army (New York Market)

BASKETBALL:(23 teams, Play each team 1 time = 22 conf games, Tourney = Top 16 playoff) ISU WVU KU KSU Cinci UConn Temple Army UT TT OU TCU Baylor OSU USF Navy Georgtown Seton Hall Providence Marquette St. John's Depaul Villanova

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Steve Brown 1 year, 4 months ago

"TV rights agreement ensures Big 12’s long-term stability" perhaps. My view is that is true until Texas and OU says it doesn't. We serve at the pleasure of the king. So row Ben Hur and live.

Still don't understand why we fly over half the USA to play Mountaineers when other prospects nearer our central time zone may have been viable.

Glad we have good minds on these issues and trust them.

It will be interesting watching CW build our program. One step at a time. KU rising!

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1timbob 1 year, 4 months ago

TAIT--So why can't you go to the big10 and keep your tier 3 and play on the big 10 network for 13 years? Would that be a way around the GOR? Can the big12 legally claim rights to the big10 network?

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pepper_bar 1 year, 4 months ago

Texas Tech lost its football coach today to Cincinnati, a Big East school.

TT fans probably maintain unreasonable expectations of their athletic teams because of the Leach and Knight years. But still, this is not exactly a ringing endorsement of the Big 12's stability - the Big East is in the process of losing all its high-profile football programs (Louisville, Syracuse, Pitt, Rutgers), so the fact that a coach would prefer the Big East's uncertain future to the pressure of Texas Tech is interesting to me.

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Robert Brown 1 year, 4 months ago

Right now I will take the 13 years compared to what we went through the last two years. Matt's summary of Grant of Rights pretty much indicates that KU was never seriously considered for membership in the Big 10 despite what everyone is claiming on this board.

I contend that once the idea of further expansion in the Big 10 came up, a lot of speculation occurred about who the target schools might be by the blogosphere. How do you come up with a list? You start with a list of AAU schools. KU makes that cut, but that's it.

By the way, how many people even knew that AAU stood for something other than the Amateur Athletic Union (and its shady basketball coaches) three years ago.

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pepper_bar 1 year, 4 months ago

Good job to whoever at LJW changed the title to label this an "opinion" piece.

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mahkmood 1 year, 4 months ago

"Opinion: TV rights agreement ensures Big 12’s long-term stability" should read "10-13 year stability". I don't consider 13 years long-term, but that's just my opinion.

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JHWKDW 1 year, 4 months ago

Wow folks is this supposed to make us feel better? Hey we will Put a gun to your head, if you dare leave us, you will pay the price little boy. Rule by thuggery wow. The more I read of this garbage and these kind of deals, it kind of reminds me of the old man Darren McGavin in the movie " A Christmas Story" after the mother breaks the leg lamp and McGavin is cursing his wife, and is determined to fix the lamp, even though it is broken beyond repair, The Big 12-2 official head honchos look like McGavin trying to glue this irreversibly damaged conference together. And in the end the Big 12-2 will still collapse like the leg lamp.

Hey look at the SEC folks they do not even have a exit fee and why would they? Would you leave them, where revenue is equally shared and everyone is happy there? That is what you call a good business model where your employees are happy. Put the Pac-12 and Big 10 as awesome business models and people who act like grown ups.. For the ACC, and Big 12 well you put a penalty on them if they find greener pastures. HMM maybe if you had equal revenue sharing Big 12-2 and everyone's voice mattered not just Texas alone no one would want to leave.

Yeah for all of you who want to bring teams from the A-Holes& Childish Crybabies, otherwise known as the ACC.get real. So you want to bring in all these arrogant,self centered, crybaby teams really? This is not like what we have here with Texas, and Texas alone. Florida State, Clemson and all of the rest of the teams have helped cause their problems. We already have a inflated ego in Texas, we do not need any egos like theirs here. So your solution is bringing these self- absorbed ACC whiners here uh no thanks. Maybe we should have booted ol corrupt, incompetent, Beebe out, and tried to keep the 4 teams we lost,in addition if we would have given Texas the boot. Just think we would only had to possibly replace 1 team for all we know.

Hey look at for example of the Pac- 12 and how they are attempting to expand their market into Asia. And look at the Big-12-2 and the childish ACC Pac-12 Grownups, ACC Big 12-2 little selfish, crybaby children see the difference people? See how a conference who is competent, and gets along and work together makes things happen? See the links below. We cannot get consensus between all our teams here, and look at the links below. Amazing what the differences are aint it?

http://www.athlonsports.com/college-football/pac-12-rise

http://www.cbssports.com/collegefootball/blog/eye-on-college-football/19240191/pac12-looking-to-play-in-asia-but-football-games-not-likely

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mahkmood 1 year, 4 months ago

"Because most high-ranking officials within the Big 12 don’t believe that any schools out there are worth that kind of money."

I don't understand this statement at all. This has to becoming from UT's mouth. Rutgers was available to the B12, but the B1G took them, and the B12 did not. Why would the B1G dilute their conference with another mouth to feed? Why did the PAC add Colorado and Utah? Why did the SEC add MU? Why is B1G wanting to dilute by going to 16? Why is SEC talking about interest in 2 more? Why add Louisville to the ACC? How can the B12 say there aren't any teams out there worth adding, when superior conferences are taking them in? The Big12 is UT's greed pot with no vision for the future. Pathetic and dying... the GOR will just make the death more prolonged and painful to watch.

Following the logic of "1 more mouth to feed isn't worth it", then the B12 should be looking how to lose members. Let's get down to 8 or 6 so each remaining team can eat fatter. Let's get rid of Baylor, TCU, KSU, and OSU so that we have fewer mouths to feed and less duplicate tv markets, and play each team twice in football. This shows that the B12 is completely controlled by UT, and that UT is not committed to building a B12 for the future. The B10 and SEC say they will expand but only if it takes them to new tv footprints. Well, the stupid B12 adds TCU (Dallas) which is already covered by UT instead of adding Rutgers. While everyone else is investing for the future by expanding tv footprint, the B12 focuses on eating well today with no thought of its demise in 10 - 13 years. Eat or be eaten (in 13 years)

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Chris1955 1 year, 4 months ago

In viewing potential B1G TEN future poaching, along with the assumption that the B1G TEN will continue its practice of only taking AAU schools, and a contiguous geographical footprint, let's examine the candidates discussed most commonly. They would seem to be Virginia, North Carolina, Georgia Tech, and Kansas.

Let's examine TV markets for these potential candidates. • Virginia Washington D.C., Richmond, Norfolk, Roanoke-Lynchburg • N. Carolina Charlotte, Raleigh-Durham, Greensboro • GA Tech Atlanta • Kansas Kansas City, Wichita

When the B1G TEN snagged Maryland, they essentially got the Washington DC market, along with Baltimore. So we will give Virginia’s addition credit for only bringing in Richmond, Norfolk, and Lynchburg. They rate as #58, #43, and #67. Would Virginia join the B1G TEN without North Carolina?

North Carolina has several good TV markets, but let's be honest, they are one of the driving members of the ACC, and don't seem likely to destroy a conference that they largely control. They are also not contiguous to the B1G TEN unless Virginia joins.

Georgia Tech adds the #8 Atlanta TV market. However, they are neither contiguous nor culturally compatible with the B1G TEN. They are also the 2nd University in Georgia behind UGA.

Kansas adds the #31 KC market and #69 Wichita market. KU is contiguous and culturally compatible with the Midwest.

With my admittedly biased spin, Kansas seems to be the next best fit for the B1G TEN as the 15th school. I could see a two division format as follows:

West: Kansas, Nebraska, Iowa, Minnesota, Northwestern, and Illinois East: Purdue, Indiana, Mich. St., Michigan, Ohio St., Penn St, Rutgers, and Maryland.

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khawk75 1 year, 4 months ago

Matt, next question. Has each institution actually signed the GOR yet? The original articles about this stated that the GOR had been agreed to by all, and the TV contracts were based on it. But it was also stated that it would take some time (various institutional Board of Directors' meetings, etc.) for each institution to formally finish all of the paperwork.

So, it would be good to know if everything is signed, sealed, and delivered as promised.

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Joe Baker 1 year, 4 months ago

Those of you who disagree with football not driving this whole realignment mess, look at the schools in discussion of gaining. Where are programs going? SEC, Pac12, and B1G. I don't see many schools going to ACC save L'ville (bball). The B12 is hanging in the balance by bringing in W Va and TCU (football). I love bball more than football, but even I can see this is shaped by football.
The Super Conferences are forming folks. Your football conferences will be Pac, SEC, and B1G. Your money and rights will be found there and to be gained by all others in D1 programs. I'm afraid it's too late to get some pie or aka $$$$. We might get some scraps if we're lucky or act. We need to hope that one of these future Conferences will take us for KU's bball's strength. The most sense and best market would be the B1G. I think that door is closing and if we fall into this GOR, we may lose out. I would rather jump and be somewhere and not jump at all be left out the way this is shaping. If KU remains, then we have one option only - Weis better get KU relevant real soon or the next round of talks may find KU in a real strange situation. We've got to bring the bball and football chip to the tables. We are leaving and will leave much of this $$$ on the negotiating table if our football program doesn't get with the program. I'm sick of people saying that KU is "a bball school only." Most of KU fans have acceped this position, but not any longer. If you love KU and most of you do, you better get your head in the football program and hope it gets competitive real soon or KU will be left out in so many ways. I really believe that Weis and Co is Zenger and Bernie's last chance to get KU competitve in the B12 and thereby providing KU with some negotiating influence.

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MoralVictory 1 year, 4 months ago

Each year, the GOR becomes less impactful, making the league less stable, literally, by the day.

Add to this the fact that good money now doesn't mean that you'll have good money later. Sitting in a cocoon and assuming that the water won't continue to rise ends up being a flawed strategy. The Big 10 is thinking about the future. The Pac 12 has already sealed up the entire country west of the Rockies, so they are set.

What's our plan? The only market that is worth having is Florida. Add Miami and FSU, create two divisions and call it a day. No other market in U.S. is left and no other market really matters.

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JayHok 1 year, 4 months ago

The fact that the B1G vetted KU says something about the strength of the Big 12 since Mizzou left. Furthermore even if the B1G really really HAD to have KU, it is nearly impossible. Again another major sign of strength. We're right where we should be. The rules changed when Neinas came back to help out. All the complaining MU did against UT went out the window when Neinas and the Big 12 presidents voted on the new rules 2 weeks before MU decided to go.

It's a whole new ball game now.

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lama 1 year, 4 months ago

Good article. I'd still like to see the language in the GOR. But barring the Big 12 blowing up, it sounds like Kansas isn't going anywhere. Look for the Big 10 to add two ACC schools -- that's what they would prefer to do, anyway. Big, growing markets, good schools -- no brainer.

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jhawkrulz 1 year, 4 months ago

I think that is an interesting point.

Iowa has benefited significantly by having Iowa State in the Big XII and Iowa in the Big Ten. If universities and especially the state legislatures could see the benefit of splitting KU and KSU, likewise OU and OSU, you could see some real movement and benefit for some of these states.

Of course, if one is relegated to a minor conference maybe not as much.

Interesting note for sure though.

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WindmillGIANT 1 year, 4 months ago

It seems like a lot of people are acting like Matt is supposed to be Bob Woodward and conference realignment is Watergate. He's talked to his sources at KU and around the conference - good enough. Are some of you amateur or professional lawyers who think you are going to crack the secret legal code of the GOR and prove that Matt's sources are all wrong or are liars and there's a huge secret deal brewing that some Pulitzer winning journalism would uncover. When there is news to report, Matt will report it. Dang folks.

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Benjamin Piehler 1 year, 4 months ago

http://espn.go.com/college-football/story/_/id/8724603/barry-alvarez-says-big-ten-expanded-part-keep-penn-state-nittany-lions

For all you in the "football is all that matters" camp.

"...I would say the driving force is demographics..." -Jim Delany

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JayHok 1 year, 4 months ago

Nope. Not unattractive at all. The big 12 can add at their discretion. No rush. Meanwhile the SEC has no exit fee. In other words we're about the most stable conference in America with extremely good exposure, where teams like MU will have to wrestle with 14-16 schools to get exposure. Also they have to split more ways.

The Big 12 absolutely did it right. One of the strongest conferences in America right now.

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Benjamin Piehler 1 year, 4 months ago

Fine, we're staying at 10. It's still an unattractive conference compared to the big dogs.

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William Blake 1 year, 4 months ago

The only thing I know for sure is this entire "fear the reaper" type approach of binding schools with financial penalties is guaranteed to create some very wealthy attorneys in the not-to-distant future!

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Krohnutz 1 year, 4 months ago

We are not going anywhere. Thus, the only thing that matters is the judgement against Maryland.

If the dollar figure is in the right ballpark, maybe the Big 12 can make it worthwhile for a pair of teams to come on over. If not, get ready for a long history of no championship game, and Scott Drew at LEAST twice a season.

But since the Big 12 appears to have ED, I expect we won't make a move until our potentials are at home with another conference.

At least when our football team goes 12-0 we will have the inside track to the football playoff.... Thanks?

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Robert Brown 1 year, 4 months ago

Matt- do you get measured by the number of comments generated by an article? If you do, all you need to do is post a conference realignment article!! It is a fascinating subject and probably a big waste of my time, but I haven't found anyone (and I've looked all over the internet) who has covered it as thoroughly as you have.

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jgkojak 1 year, 4 months ago

This is all solved with an 8 team play-off --

if you create a play-off that takes the top FIVE conf. champs (as ranked by the BCS) and the top three at-larges -- the ACC and Mountain West will compete every year for that 5th slot. If you take the top SIX conf.. champs (which is what should be done) then you completely end all of this BS.

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Robert Brown 1 year, 4 months ago

Which conference members benefited the most by agreeing to the Grant of Rights? I'm sure it was Baylor, KU, KSU, and Iowa State more so that UT, OU and their in-state partners. We should be happy with the current situation. What is wrong with being the Big 12? Five of the original Big 8 schools remain there. The geographic footprint is still relatively small. It is easy to get to Texas from Kansas. We get all of our football games televised and we have a place to showcase our basketball program.

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Dickless Head 1 year, 4 months ago

KU was stupid to sign this agreement. Now we're stuck in a crappy conference with a bunch of hillybilly, redneck schools, that is sure to dissipate the minute this agreement wears out in 13 years. By then, the Big 10, SEC and Pac-12 will have made its moves and KU will have no where to go. Dumb dumb dumb.

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JayHok 1 year, 4 months ago

All this bragging from Quantril's raiders fans and there is no exit fee from the SEC? No grant of rights? And the big 12, per team currently makes about the same (maybe more) per team? And Quantril's guys would prefer to not have their own 3rd tier deal if possible, unless of course Bama and LSU strike deals first with ESPN, because they're banking on the SEC network, trusting this is the end all and be all.

Fascinating how poor of a decision Quantril's guys made by rushing into a decision before even listening to what Neinas had to say. Now their basketball team doesnt have the key assistant coach who made them look so great at times last year, Newton?, and losing Dixon, a huge part of their fluidity last year to go with Newton's coaching. And their best football recruiter, OC, who pulled in DGB, has decided to leave after fans ran him off.

I am very happy to play Colorado again. I fully support that decision. Colorado left for the right reasons. Quantril's guys, on the other hand, stirred the trouble from the beginning and kept it going with all kinds of embarrassing ovatures.

Proud of the big 12 and what Neinas did.

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Robin Smith 1 year, 4 months ago

without having much additional knowledge to offer aside from reports seen here, elsewhere, and the informed comments of my fellows

my gist is that GoR is about as strong a commitment as there will be for any conference almost ever, even if it's a breakable deal

am I wrong? or do we think it possible to get conference members to agree to something more ironclad?

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BPSkelly 1 year, 4 months ago

I'll parrot off of kusteveh as well. I know ive mentioned this before in all these realignment rants. I think KU is in a strong place media wise. Pac12/Big10 are ostensibly Fox. SEC/ACC is ostensibly ESPN. From what I've understood, we (Big 12) have the most 'split' media set up with ABC/ESPN vs. Fox. We're in a good place to play each 'side' (ESPN / Fox) off each other. It benefits both of them as well, because we dont force either to take on to much inventory. It benefits the conference with multiple outlets for viewing. My guess is as well in future years, once "Fox Sports 1" gets rolling -- Fox's run at ESPN they'll even be more of that.


As for Grant of Rights, my questions for the detractors is what else is there to show folks they are together? A Wedding Ceremony? I agree that no legal arrangement is entirely fool proof. But if 3 of the "Big 6" (now turning into Big 5) -- Pac 12, Big 10, Big 12 have it and 3 others that dont -- ACC, Big East, SEC, which do you think has more of a chance of staying together? So maybe its not "ironclad". But what's the obscene threshold level that one would need to see to believe it? I love how there seems to be folks that think someone who's never passed the Bar Exam could unwind this on a casual afternoon and it would be total anarchy and doom.


I still think the reason the rumblings about the ACC likely wont subside -- although it doesnt mean they arent around another 20 years -- is the fact that of the major conferences, they clearly get the least amount of money per school. And at its core, thats really what this is all about. Money... and the TV sets to provide it. It's not the year to year money either. It's the 10-20 year projections where the differences start to show.

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Ted Adams 1 year, 4 months ago

Matt brings up a very interesting point in his article.

The Pac12 and B1G have had GoR. No teams have left either league in all this mess. The Big Least, ACC, and BigXII DID NOT have GoR and all have lost teams. The BigXII now HAS GoR. I would venture to say that the SEC will soon have GoR, if it hasn't done so already since the addition of MU and TA&M.

It seems that you now have 4 solid leagues, and the rest aren't going to ever have GoR until the merry-go-round stops for the Big 4 conferences.

Seems the Big XII now understands what they should have done years ago with the GoR.

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Robert Brown 1 year, 4 months ago

It is predictable that people are trashing the article because it essentially takes off the table two items that many on this forum want to see happening. The first is KU leaving the Big 12. Grant of rights pretty much shuts that door. The other is having the Big 12 expand for the sake of expanding. That also does not appear likely.

This is all about financial stability. Right now, if KU went to the Big 10, they might actually take in less revenue. The Big 10 Network paid about $8M per school for the 3rd tier rights which is roughly equal to what KU got by keeping its third tier rights in the Big 12. The Big 12 has done a great job in increasing the revenues in a very short period of time.

As for expansion, I think it is important to understand that the Big 12 model is different than the Big 10's. The Big 10 is trying to get revenue by expanding its network into other parts of the country. The Big 12 has no network and sells the strong brands (UT, OU) to the networks to get a lucrative media package. Allowing every school to take control of its Tier 3 rights certainly created problem when the Longhorn Network was formed, but we should realize that KU does pretty well selling its Tier 3 rights. It's not the $15M from the Longhorn network, but I have read where it is between $8-10M which is quite nice.

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Steve Hillyer 1 year, 4 months ago

I'm probably not going to be able to articulate this very well but I'll try anyway, the money going to the Big 12 and Big 10 is coming from the same source, the conferences aren't really doing anything without the consent of the networks, if the Big 10 wants to extend an invitation to KU I'm sure ESPN and FOX (who is majority owner of BTN) consented and will still be paying the conferences their money as well as make money from televising the games. I can see if KU ended up going to the SEC for some reason where CBS has a contract to televise the games things could get complicated, but if a school is going from one conference to another and each is getting paid from the same source I think it would be easy to do.
It has been reported in legitimate media (non Twitter, blog junk) that the Big 10 has vetted KU, I'm quite positive the Big 10 was aware of the GOR when they started the vetting, so they must think the GOR is not "ironclad".

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Tony Bandle 1 year, 4 months ago

I will add my four cents [adjusted for current inflation]....one thing everyone seems to ignore is the human capacity for short-sightedness, greed, stupidity and member measuring.

Despite everything that has been brought forward in the previous posts, every articulated stipilation, legalese phrasing and "ironclad" guarantee...if there exists a way around this GOR, it will be discovered and utilized.

I will bet anything with any of you that this conference will not be the same in 13 years.....hell, it may not be the same in 13 weeks!!

Still, Matt, for what it is, a very, very nice article. Thanks.

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Phil Leister 1 year, 4 months ago

I'm not sure why people are discussing how we may be able to get out of the Big12 and go to the B1G. The whole point of this article is that we stand to make loads of money in the next 13 years, and the incentive for us, and any other Big12 school, to leave is greatly diminished. What does the B1G offer that we don't currently have? Football's all that matters here, so are we hoping to find something that the Big12 football teams don't offer? Newsflash: top to bottom, the Big12 is the strongest football conference (every team except for KU is bowl eligible). If we are going to take basketball into consideration, which is silly, the B1G won't give us any more exposure or competitiveness than our current situation.

Why anyone is offering conjecture about us moving conferences is beyond me. What we should be discussing is the benefits/drawbacks about adding a Florida State or Clemson.

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Ethan Berger 1 year, 4 months ago

My two cents, if we must leave, leave. If we don't need to leave, don't leave.

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William Blake 1 year, 4 months ago

I can't get my mind around this GOR and how it guarantees stability for the B12. I guess it matters how "stability" is defined.... if it is only defined as keeping the same teams for the next 13 years... maybe, but still no guarantee.

And what about the strength of the B12? What if we don't have a National Champion for the next 13 years? What if the B12 fan base drops significantly? It seems like we should emphasize the fan base more than trying to lock down schools and limit their futures.

And what if we have interest from a Florida State or Clemson? Will they want to jump on board a train they can't later get off of?

And what if a few schools in the B12 still leave? What if we are down to just a few schools... are those remaining schools still bound by the GOR?

To me, it doesn't look great for your conference when you have to lock down schools by holding their TV revenue ransom in order to keep them. It is a perception issue.

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LawHawk2011 1 year, 4 months ago

I expected more than a few poorly explained facts linked together by conjecture. I'm disappointed, Mr. Tait.

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Michael Maris 1 year, 4 months ago

Matt, how many different names does the Big XII Conference have trademark names to? I remember seeing this information some time ago. But, I can't remember all of the trademark names that they have possession of? Thanks.

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hawkfan20 1 year, 4 months ago

Matt, good article subject. I would have liked to have seen an opinion from an attorney in the article because it seems like all contract disputes end up being resolved in court one way or another. If this were 100% true on the GoR, KU wouldn't waste their time talking with the Big 10. There's something we don't know here. Either we don't believe the GoR is bullet proof or we can see enough teams leaving the league were it would dissolve. Something isn't adding up.

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phogphan2000 1 year, 4 months ago

I wonder how worthwhile it would be for the B12 to invite DePaul and Marquette as basketball only schools. Not sure how it works with the BE between football/non-football schools, but it would allow the B12 to legitimately have 12 schools but not share the majority of the money with the new guys and possibly expand the tv footprint of the conference overall. Or you could look at Butler or SLU.

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THE_REAL_DEAL_WITH_BILL_MCNEIL 1 year, 4 months ago

I still have one big question: has anyone actually seen the Grant of Rights? Matt, have you? I mean, we can all sit here and speculate on what it says, but without seeing the actual language, what's the point? It seems to me like this article is just based on second and third-hand information that has been run through several filters. The "Big 12 sources" are of course all going to make it sound bulletproof. It would be nice to get some objective analysis on this, and the best way to do that is to start with the document itself.

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jhawkrulz 1 year, 4 months ago

I apologize that this isn't directly related to GoR, but my question is if this is all about TV Markets, the Big XII is the most vulnerable.

KSU, Baylor, TCU, and OSU provide no TV markets, in addition, one would question how much TTU and ISU bring as well.

If TV is driving the realignment, TV will push for the dissolving of the Big XII over the ACC. The ACC is maybe more basketball centric, it still holds some of the key TV markets.

I could see TV wanting to dissolve the Big XII, so schools like those mentioned above, they wouldn't have to pay $20MM/year to get.

I still think Wake Forest is the only one from the ACC is less desirable from a TV Market perspective.

Again if you add academics into the picture, the ACC seems to have the strength there as well.

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ahpersecoachingexperience 1 year, 4 months ago

Got it, we play every football game on the road for 13 years! Our record would remain unchanged. BIG her we come!!!!

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pepper_bar 1 year, 4 months ago

This article seems designed to support Matt's pre-existing theory that the GOR is bulletproof. It isn't.

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jgkojak 1 year, 4 months ago

By the way- let me note-

WOW! REAL REPORTING IN THE LJW! A STORY WITH FACTS NOT AVAILABLE ON GOOGLE OR WIKIPEDIA WITH ACTUAL IN-DEPTH REPORTING!

Too bad this is only available on the sports page.

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jgkojak 1 year, 4 months ago

I'd argue FSU would bring enough $$ - its just the partner school, even Ga Tech, being able to deliver enough bang for buck.

I've argued if the B12 wanted this iron-clad grant of rights stick at 10 member thing, they should have added BYU instead of WVU -

-better academics -better athletics -out of the fray between the Big East and ACC - its likely WVU would have gotten the ACC nod over Louisville

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jhawkrulz 1 year, 4 months ago

The article doesn't address one of the key lawsuit issues that Maryland will hold on to, which is applicable to the Big XII contract. The contract was issued in the middle of the year. Prior to the extension of the contract the GoR was for like 4 years of which 2 years will be up in June. If a team were to leave early, they could reference the point Maryland is making that the contract can't be held until the beginning of the next year. If that were true, KU (or another team) could say we really owe two years of Grant of Rights. In addition, they could reference the previous dollar amount of the contract and leave for somewhere in the neighborhood of $20-$30 MM and not the $250MM estimate.

I personally believe if the Big Ten comes to KU, KU will be able to leave for a reasonable negotiated amount.

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TaCityHawkFan 1 year, 4 months ago

Matt,

Thanks for the article! I know you have been working on it for a while now with the comments from recent "Tale of the Tait" posts this past week.

The information here is great and I hope that the reasoning that this is a legitimate, enforceable agreement holds up. One thing I am not clear on, is it all of their rights or only what would be considered home, Big 12 games? You gave the example that if Kansas plays Ohio St. or Michigan in Lawrence that B1G would not get the revenue. What about if we play at Ohio St or Michigan? What about neutral site?

Thanks for all of the info!

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THE_REAL_DEAL_WITH_BILL_MCNEIL 1 year, 4 months ago

I think FSU, Clemson, and GT would all be candidates to bring in enough to warrant expansion. Also, remember that the Big 12 doesn't need to go to 12. It could go to 11.

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championhawks 1 year, 4 months ago

So how does a school like Florida St. not able to bring more tv revenue? It would bring a market that the Big XII isn't tapping into at all. Wouldn't that bring more tv sets to the tv partners, and therefore the Big XII would be able to cash in on more money to bring them aboard?

Could you explain that and why that isn't the case?

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Kyle Sybesma 1 year, 4 months ago

Great Article Matt. Much needed information. Thank You

Is it fair to say that the B1G is adding schools because their TV contract will be renewed soon and they want to be in as many TV markets as possible to max out that contract?

My point is.... Why are the TV partners saying it's OK for the B1G to add and not the Big 12?

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jhawkrulz 1 year, 4 months ago

I said it in a previous email: If KU goes to the Big Ten, play all of its "home" games at Arrowhead. The Big Ten keeps the revenue.

As for Basketball, it gets a little trickier, but I would point out, the majority of basketball games fall to Tier 3, so it wouldn't be as big of a deal.

So if KU wants out, they use the above to negotiate an out for a lot less.

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THE_REAL_DEAL_WITH_BILL_MCNEIL 1 year, 4 months ago

"Unlike exit fees, which are liquidated damages and can be negotiated in court and proven to be valid or invalid, the GOR agreement is not up for interpretation, according to a report written by Mit Winter of BuisnessofCollegeSports.com. It stands to reason then, that it is much more likely to hold up in court as a legitimate, enforceable contract."

That's quite a leap.

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THE_REAL_DEAL_WITH_BILL_MCNEIL 1 year, 4 months ago

So....how many votes does it take to dissolve the Big 12, thereby eliminating the GoR?

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Krohnutz 1 year, 4 months ago

I have no problem with staying in the Big 12. I do have a problem with the Big 12 not proactively poaching a couple ACC teams.

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