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Posts tagged with Wayne Selden Jr.

Watch Wayne Selden Jr. sky for a savage D-League slam

Kansas guard Wayne Selden Jr. (1) puts down a slam dunk in the second-half against the Connecticut Huskies in a 73-61 win at Wells Fargo Arena in Des Moines, IA. Saturday, March 19, 2016.

Kansas guard Wayne Selden Jr. (1) puts down a slam dunk in the second-half against the Connecticut Huskies in a 73-61 win at Wells Fargo Arena in Des Moines, IA. Saturday, March 19, 2016. by Mike Yoder

Since Wayne Selden Jr. left the University of Kansas a year early to enter the NBA Draft, things haven’t exactly gone according to plan for the young shooting guard.

A meniscus tear in his right knee slowed Selden down leading up to the draft, which came and went without the 6-foot-4 prospect hearing his name called. And though Selden landed a preseason camp invite from Memphis, the Grizzlies parted ways with him before the regular season.

Though his basketball journey currently finds Selden in the NBA’s Developmental League, it doesn’t seem to have curbed his approach. Eight games into the season, he’s averaging 19.5 points to lead the Iowa Energy, the Grizzlies’ D-League affiliate.

Selden is hitting 2.3 3-pointers a game at a 35.3% clip and averaging 6.4 rebounds, 3.1 assists and 1.8 steals, too.

His overall 47.6% shooting from the floor, no doubt, has been helped by his tenacity in attacking the rim.

On Sunday, in a game against Fort Wayne, Selden drove to the paint and took off for a nasty one-handed throw-down over Rakeem Christmas as if to say, “Bah humbug!”

The 22-year-old Selden currently ranks 17th in the D-League in scoring. That won’t guarantee him an invite to an NBA roster by any means, but the more he keeps playing with confidence and aggression, the more Selden will get noticed by organization’s scouts and increase his odds of speeding up his track to The Association.

Selden’s knee doesn’t appear to be giving him any issues at this juncture, which is a good sign. His strength and athleticism are a big part of his game on both ends of the floor.

And, of course, the more he works on his 3-pointer the better. So far Selden has hit 18 of 51 from long range. If he can get his 3-point shooting at or above 40% he’ll look that much more enticing to NBA decision-makers.

Perhaps going undrafted has inspired Selden. His highlights make him look one of the better young players in the D-League.

Reply 4 comments from Pius Waldman Surrealku Brian Skelly Craig Alexander

Wayne Selden Jr. trying to move past disappointment of going undrafted

Kansas guard Wayne Selden Jr. (1) reacts after a foul was called against the Jayhawks during the first half, Thursday, March 10, 2016 at Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo.

Kansas guard Wayne Selden Jr. (1) reacts after a foul was called against the Jayhawks during the first half, Thursday, March 10, 2016 at Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo. by Nick Krug

Projected as a mid- to late-second-round pick after leaving Kansas a year early to enter the NBA Draft, Wayne Selden Jr. remained mostly silent in the days following what had to be a disappointing night for the 21-year-old guard, who watched from afar as 60 other players realized their dreams of being drafted into the world’s best basketball league.

In perhaps an even more surprising development for the undrafted Selden, no news regarding a free-agent deal or summer league assignment popped up for him after the June 23 draft, while his KU teammates Perry Ellis, Brannen Greene, Jamari Traylor and Hunter Mickelson filled out summer rosters for various organizations.

A week after posting a photo on Instagram of what looked to be a shot taken inside the Memphis Grizzlies’ locker room, Selden finally took to Twitter Friday afternoon to share what has been on his mind, as a pro basketball player in limbo.

“You know, I was real frustrated when I didn’t hear my name called on draft night,” Selden wrote in the note he posted, along with the hashtag: TrustTheProcess. “Something I worked my whole life for, something I dreamed of. But I didn’t just work to hear my name called, I worked and continue to work to have a successful NBA career.

“After draft night, I felt like everything I worked for was a waste and got real down,” Selden continued in the note. “But now as I sit back and put everything into perspective, I’m truly blessed to be in this position I’m in. I know there are others out there that would kill to be where I’m at.

“Growing up coming where I’m from, all we wanted was an opportunity, a chance,” Selden added. “And the Memphis Grizzlies did just that by giving me a chance. God bless.”

According to The Commercial Appeal, Selden will be a non-roster player with the Grizzlies, meaning he’ll be a part of their preseason training camp in the fall, and the organization will decide from there how or if they want to move forward with the former KU guard, who averaged 13.6 points and shot 38.3% from 3-point range during his junior season.

Selden is not playing for the Grizzlies’ summer league entry in Las Vegas, a couple months removed from a “small” meniscus tear in his right knee, which kept him from participating in drills and scrimmages at the NBA Draft Combine. So he can’t even use July as a springboard for something bigger a few months from now.

Obviously, this path to the NBA isn’t an easy one. Nor is it what Selden envisioned when he decided to leave Kansas a year early. But if the thoughts highlighted in his note are genuine, he at least now has harnessed the right approach to work toward making that dream come true.

Although, as the Commercial Appeal’s Chris Herrington’s projected Grizzlies depth chart highlights, Selden truly will have to impress Memphis to stick around, because they’re not desperate to add a wing. The Grizzlies already have Tony Allen, Troy Daniels and Jordan Adams at shooting guard, and Chandler Parsons, James Ennis and Vince Carter at small forward.

The process and timeline for Selden reaching the NBA appear to be lengthy. Perhaps now that he understands that, he’ll become even more inspired to make it happen.

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Reply 14 comments from David McGee Surrealku Marius7782 Brian Skelly Titus Canby Michael Lorraine Table_rock_jayhawk Pius Waldman The_muser Oddgirltoo and 3 others

Stock watch: Finding the right NBA team for Wayne Selden Jr.

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When Wayne Selden Jr. first arrived at Kansas in 2013, some thought the Roxbury, Mass., native would play one season of college basketball and enter the NBA Draft for guaranteed money, just like his KU teammates Andrew Wiggins and Joel Embiid.

Two years after Selden rightfully stayed in college and his two teammates were taken in the first three picks, the 6-foot-5 guard heads into his own draft night with far less certainty.

Selden won’t be a lottery pick or even a first-round pick, according to draft experts. As of Wednesday afternoon, DraftExpress.com slotted Selden as the 50th overall pick, going in the second round to Indiana.

The general consensus on the 6-foot-5 shooting guard with a 6-foot-10 wingspan is that he’ll be selected somewhere in that range — mid- to late-second round.

That might not seem like an ideal set of circumstances for a player who left school early, but teams seem interested in Selden. After averaging 13.6 points, 2.5 assists and 3.4 rebounds in his junior season with Kansas, during which he shot 46.9% from the floor and 38.3% on 3-pointers, Selden was invited to pre-draft workouts with Milwaukee, Chicago, San Antonio, Houston, the Los Angeles Lakers, New York, New Orleans, Charlotte, the L.A. Clippers, Dallas, Boston, Oklahoma City and Brookly. (As you can see via the T-shirts Selden has collected during his tour, which are all posted on his Twitter feed.)

None by Wayne Selden Jr.

You can still be a commodity as a prospect, even if you’re not a lottery pick. Teams know what they’re getting with Selden, and while that might not be enough for one to use a first-round pick on him that doesn’t mean he’ll have an uphill battle to make a roster as a second-rounder.

Selden is explosive when healthy and his toughness and defensive ability have improved after three years of playing for Bill Self. Plus, his passing skills and floor vision often go unappreciated, and those will be useful tools for him at the next level as a backup guard trying to work his way into a secure role in some team’s rotation.

Also, in a bit of a twist, it could be possible for a second-round draft choice this season to have his agent negotiate a more lucrative deal than some first-rounders are locked into. That stems from the rising salary cap this summer and the way first-round contracts currently are structured, as reported by Dan Feidman at NBCSports.

Here’s a look at the teams which currently own second-round draft picks in the range projected for Selden. Keep in mind second-round picks get traded like crazy almost every draft night.

  • No. 45, Boston

  • No. 46, Dallas

  • No. 47, Orlando

  • No. 48, Chicago

  • No. 49, Detroit

  • No. 50, Indiana

  • No. 51, Boston

  • No. 52, Utah

  • No. 53, Denver

  • No. 54, Atlanta

Kansas guard Wayne Selden Jr. (1) comes in for a jam as Baylor guard Ishmail Wainright (24) watches during the first half, Friday, March 11, 2016 at Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo.

Kansas guard Wayne Selden Jr. (1) comes in for a jam as Baylor guard Ishmail Wainright (24) watches during the first half, Friday, March 11, 2016 at Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo. by Nick Krug

Assuming Selden goes somewhere in this vicinity of the second round, let’s take a look at how he might fit in with each organization.

BOSTON, 45th pick, 51st pick — If the Celtics don’t move out of this range via trade (they enter draft day with a whopping eight picks), Selden certainly wouldn’t mind playing for his hometown team.

However, Boston does have a bit of a crowded backcourt — at this stage of the offseason at least, though any number of moves could materialize in the days and months ahead. The Celtics return all-star Isaiah Thomas, Avery Bradley and Marcus Smart, as well as 2015 first-round picks Terry Rozier and R.J. Hunter. All five guards are under contract for multiple seasons.

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If Boston takes Selden, he would only get significant minutes as a rookie if Danny Ainge and Brad Stevens aren’t sold on the longterm viability of Hunter, a 3-point specialist, or one or more of the team’s other returning guards end up getting traded.

Should the opportunity for playing time materialize with the Celtics, I think Selden would fit in nicely as a backup guard right off the bat.

DALLAS, 46th pick — With Wesley Matthews, one of the league’s better unheralded shooting guards, in the starting lineup, there probably won’t be a lot of minutes for a backup with the Mavericks.

Then again, that could be a perfect situation for Selden. Matthews would be an ideal tutor for the KU rookie and Selden could gradually attempt to turn into Matthews 2.0. They’re similarly built, and while Matthews is for sure a better 3-point shooter, one could see Selden getting better in that area.

ORLANDO, 47th pick — Already young and up-and-coming in the backcourt, the Magic might have too many players in that category to add another in Selden.

Victor Oladipo, Elfrid Payton and Mario Hezonja all return for Orlando, which also has veteran C.J. Watson and seldom-used Shabazz Napier under contract.

Should the Magic draft Selden, it seems it would be for insurance purposes, in case one of the established players suffered an injury. In a best-case scenario for Selden in Orlando, he would prove athletic and versatile enough to be the No. 4 guard.

CHICAGO, 48th pick — The Bulls just traded homegrown former MVP Derrick Rose, so you’ve got to assume they’re riding with shooting guard Jimmy Butler as the new face of the franchise.

Again, this would be a case where Selden could learn from a great guard, assuming Chicago doesn’t blow the whole thing up and trade Butler, too.

Assuming the Bulls keep Butler and Selden absorbs all the NBA knowledge he can from the rising star, it could prove great for Selden’s longevity and effectiveness in the years ahead.

DETROIT, 49th pick — A 23-year-old shooting guard coming off his best season, the Pistons’ Kentavious Caldwell-Pope is solidified as the team’s starter.

But Detroit could use some bench help at the position, especially when you consider Jodie Meeks missed almost the entire 2014-15 season due to injury. Who knows how effective Meeks, a 3-point specialist, will be next year.

Selden could, in theory, be a more complete player than Meeks and thereby making up for what he lacks in professional experience. But if Meeks is at 100% and he produces from downtown, it would be hard for Selden to break into the rotation.

Kansas guard Wayne Selden Jr. (1) drives against West Virginia guard Jaysean Paige (5) during the first half, Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas guard Wayne Selden Jr. (1) drives against West Virginia guard Jaysean Paige (5) during the first half, Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

INDIANA, 50th pick — The Pacers already have a pair of veteran shooting guards in Monta Ellis and Rodney Stuckey. And while both are more combo guard than true 2-guards, they combined to play more than 50 minutes a game last season.

Additionally, when Indiana traded Wednesday for Jeff Teague it made it a lot less likely for the team to be forced to use Ellis and Stuckey at point guard.

If Selden gets picked by the Pacers, he’d have a long way to go before becoming part of the rotation.

UTAH, 52nd pick — Shooting guard Alec Burks has only played in 58 games over the past two seasons, so the Jazz might at least think about adding an insurance policy at the 2-guard during some portion of the offseason.

But if Burks finally bounces back health-wise, there would be almost no playing time available for another player at that position, behind Rodney Hood, coming off a monster second season, and veteran Shelvin Mack playing both guard spots.

Personally, I think Utah would go another direction with this pick.

DENVER, 53rd pick — Will Barton and Gary Harris are more than capable shooting guards. The Nuggets’ versatile roster also features forwards who fill in in the backcourt: Danilo Gallinari and Wilson Chandler.

This is another team that probably doesn’t need Selden, but sometimes organizations just take their highest-rated player available, regardless of what the rest of the roster looks like.

ATLANTA, 54th pick — The Hawks could lose high-energy wing Kent Bazemore in free agency this summer. If so, you could see Selden finding a spot in Atlanta’s rotation.

Shooter extraordinaire Kyle Korver might be on the back end of his career, but figures to be penciled in as the Hawks’ starting 2-guard. After that, defensive specialist Thabo Sefolosha, who also plays small forward, and Tim Hardaway Jr., who only played 16.9 minutes last season, are the other options.

Selden already is physically stronger than Hardaway, which wouldn’t automatically mean he deserves equal or more consideration. Still, the KU rookie would seem to have a shot.

But if Bazemore comes back, Selden could spend a lot of time on the end of Atlanta’s bench.

— PODCAST: How many Jayhawks will be taken in the 2016 NBA Draft?

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Stock watch: Wayne Selden Jr. staying busy with pre-draft workouts

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The NBA Draft is still a week away, and for Wayne Selden Jr. more plane trips, workouts and chances to prove he can play at the next level remain.

Already, the Kansas guard who turned pro a year early has shown off his skills for Milwaukee, Chicago, San Antonio, Houston, the Los Angeles Lakers, New York, New Orleans and Charlotte.

“You just take it day by day, you know,” Selden said Wednesday during a Q&A with Charlotte media. “You don’t really think ahead, you don’t think about past workouts. You wake up, sometimes you don’t know what city you’re in, but you’ve just gotta go do the workout.”

After a slight knee injury kept the 6-foot-5 prospect from participating in NBA Draft Combine drills and scrimmages, putting him at somewhat of a disadvantage against his competition, Selden at least appears to have recovered health-wise, re-gaining his bounce, explosion and lift on his jump shots.

At Selden’s latest pre-draft session, with the Hornets, he hit unguarded 2-point jumpers and 3-pointers from the left wing and left corner with ease. During one drill, the 232-pound shooting guard ran from corner to corner, finishing alley-oops at the rim each time he passed through the paint.

In a more traditional scrimmage setting, Selden nailed a jumper from the right wing. And during some one-on-one work, he got by his man for a reverse layup.

Check out the highlights from his Charlotte workout below.

None by Charlotte Hornets

Following the on-court display, Selden said he thought his latest test went as he hoped.

“I shot the ball pretty well, got in the swing of things pretty good,” Selden added.

As good as he looked in Charlotte, it doesn’t seem Selden’s recent workouts have generated enough steam for him to move up the mock drafts as of yet.

DraftExpress.com predicts the 22-year-old guard with a 6-foot-10.5 wingspan will be the 49th overall pick, going to Detroit in the second round.

Meanwhile, nbadraft.net has Selden getting taken a little later — 56th overall, by Denver.

Regardless of which city he is in or which team he finds himself working out for, Selden said he tries to showcase the things he can excel at on the court, such as: passing ability, creating out of screen-and-roll actions, guarding multiple positions, and “being an athlete.”

Playing at Kansas, he added, “tremendously” prepared him for this jump to the next level.

“Especially being there for three years,” Selden said, “and being able to mature there as a player, as a person, and overall.”

Kansas guard Wayne Selden Jr. (1) leans in for a shot over Connecticut forward Shonn Miller (32) during the first half on Saturday, March 19, 2016 at Wells Fargo Arena in Des Moines.

Kansas guard Wayne Selden Jr. (1) leans in for a shot over Connecticut forward Shonn Miller (32) during the first half on Saturday, March 19, 2016 at Wells Fargo Arena in Des Moines. by Nick Krug

Seeing as how he just worked out for the Hornets, Selden was asked what he thought about the possibility of playing for the organization.

“I think I’d be a good fit, just being able to stretch the defense, being able to knock shots down, being able to play run-and-gun, stuff like that,” Selden said. “Being able to guard different positions.”

The Hornets currently own just one pick in the draft, and it’s in the first round at No. 22. All the projections floating around indicate that would be far too early to take Selden. But Charlotte could maneuver its way into a second-round pick pretty easily if it so desired.

What’s more, Selden could be an inexpensive option for the Hornets, who could potentially lose Nicolas Batum, Courtney Lee and Jeremy Lin in free agency and find themselves in need of some backcourt help to go with Kemba Walker.

Earlier in the week, Selden worked out with New Orleans, where he encountered some less serious questions. In particular: How old is Perry Ellis?

“That’s a good question,” Selden deadpanned, shrugging his shoulders. “I’m kidding. He’s only 22, right? I don’t know. I think he’s 22.”

Nailed it. Ellis is only 22, despite those social media photoshop jobs that might suggest otherwise.

None by Harrison Faigen

According to Selden, the Jayhawks never jumped on that joke bandwagon.

“Nobody talked to Perry like that. We all respected Perry too much,” Selden shared, with the question coming up because Ellis attended the same Pelicans workout. “Perry didn’t get no jokes at him or nothing in the locker room. Perry was the man. Nobody would dare.”

As for Selden’s New Orleans showing, at least one reporter was amazed with his effortless dunking and asked if that’s something he spends a lot of time practicing.

“I just feel really good lately,” Selden said of his explosiveness.

Kansas guard Wayne Selden Jr. (1) comes down after going baseline for a dunk during the second half, Friday, March 11, 2016 at Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo.

Kansas guard Wayne Selden Jr. (1) comes down after going baseline for a dunk during the second half, Friday, March 11, 2016 at Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo. by Nick Krug

Of course, Selden knows no team is drafting him solely for his powerful dunks.

“I’m just trying to play my game. That’s the biggest thing. Nothing more. Nothing less,” Selden said. “I can shoot it, I can guard different positions, I can get to the basket, I can create for others.”

What does the aspiring NBA 2-guard think of the Pelicans?

“It’s a good team. They’ve got a superstar in Anthony Davis. They’ve got great guard play and they’re good in transition, so I think that’s where I could fit,” Selden responded.

Unlike the Hornets, the Pelicans do own a couple of second-round picks not too far away from the range where Selden is expected to be drafted. New Orleans has back-to-back choices at No. 39 and No. 40.

While New Orleans does have Tyreke Evans, Jrue Holiday, Quincy Pondexter and Toney Douglas returning to its backcourt, injury issues often have depleted the team of its full cast the past couple of years, and Selden could give the Pelicans some rotation depth.

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Stock watch: Wayne Selden’s knee injury not helping 2nd-round status

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When Wayne Selden Jr. opted to undergo a procedure to fix a “small” meniscus tear in his right knee, it meant the junior shooting guard from Kansas wouldn’t be able to, you know, play basketball at the NBA Draft Combine.

Theoretically, Selden could have helped his draft status — like teammate Cheick Diallo did — by going through drills and making plays in scrimmages. Maybe the 6-foot-5 guard could have impressed enough scouts and coaches to establish himself as a likely first-round pick.

Instead, Selden will have to try and bust into the first round the hard way, as he works out for various organizations in the weeks to come.

At this point, Selden is projected to go in the middle of the second round. DraftExpress currently slots Selden at 47th, to Orlando, and NBADraft.net guesses Boston will take the Roxbury, Mass., native 45th.

While at the combine last week, when Selden wasn’t having some fun with Georges Niang, he got measured (8-foot-5 standing reach, 6-10.5 wingspan, 6-5.75 height in shoes, 6-4.25 height without shoes, 232.4 pounds, 7.3% body fat, 9.25 inches hand width, 9.0 inches hand length) and interviewed with a number of teams. Selden told BasketballInsiders.com he interviewed with representatives from Indiana, Dallas, Charlotte, New York, Denver “and a few other teams.”

Kansas guard Wayne Selden Jr. (1) pulls the ball away form Maryland guard Rasheed Sulaimon (0) during the second half, Thursday, March 24, 2016 at KFC Yum! Center in Louisville, Kentucky.

Kansas guard Wayne Selden Jr. (1) pulls the ball away form Maryland guard Rasheed Sulaimon (0) during the second half, Thursday, March 24, 2016 at KFC Yum! Center in Louisville, Kentucky. by Nick Krug

After going through the process of finding an AAU home and a college basketball program, Selden said the process wasn’t too overwhelming.

“But this time you don’t pick,” he added of the biggest difference heading into the next stage of his basketball life.

Selden said his trip to the combine was a step toward achieving his dream, but his knee injury made it tough for him.

“You wanna get out there and always want to be able to compete and stuff like that,” Selden said. “But I’m not trying to rush anything, so I’m just gonna take my time, and when I’m ready I’ll be out there.”

According to Selden, his basketball workouts are already back to “almost full speed,” but the possibility of contact while playing setting him back forced his decision to sit out.

“I’m about two to three weeks out,” he said of returning to normal basketball activities and being able to show off the athleticism that made him stand out at Kansas.

In the weeks leading up to the draft, while trying to prove he can contribute to an NBA team, Selden hopes his “uber-competitive” nature and work ethic will come across to coaches and executives.

Asked to name current or former players he tries to emulate, Selden explained his approach to becoming a successful shooting guard at the next level.

“Not really modeling too much,” Selden said, “but I’m looking at a lot of different film now on guys like Nick Anderson, Mitch Richmond, Dwyane Wade, Michael Finley, just different guys like that, just trying to pick different things from those guys.”

Selden, who played three seasons at KU, said his time in Lawrence prepared him well for the pre-draft process.

“It made me a man,” the 21-year-old said, “and, you know, especially at Kansas with the media attention we get and stuff like that. And coach wasn’t easy on us, and I had to grow up there. And it really prepared me for this moment.”

We’ll continue to track Selden’s journey toward the draft, as well as the stock of KU players Diallo, Perry Ellis and Brannen Greene, in the weeks ahead at KUsports.com.

— Watch Selden’s complete interview with BasketballInsiders.com below:

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Coming off hot summer, Wayne Selden Jr. plans to be more effective scorer

Kansas guard Wayne Selden Jr. (1) drives to the basket in a Team USA gold-medal game against Germany Monday, July 13, at the World University Games in South Korea.

Kansas guard Wayne Selden Jr. (1) drives to the basket in a Team USA gold-medal game against Germany Monday, July 13, at the World University Games in South Korea. by Mike Yoder

After spending a good chunk of his summer preparing for the World University Games, in South Korea, and then leading Kansas/Team USA to a gold medal, Wayne Selden Jr.’s basketball journeys continued with a trip to the adidas Nations event, near Los Angeles, in early August.

It was there that DraftExpress.com caught up with Selden, a junior guard at KU, for a quick interview. Though he has played two seasons in the Big 12, Selden described the competition level at adidas Nations as high, too.

“You know, it’s basically everybody that’s left in college, that’s been around for a few years, and it’s a lot of guys that just know how to play basketball,” Selden said.

According to SBNation.com, Selden played on one of the four teams there that featured college players, and he teamed up with Iowa State’s Monté Morris and Gonzaga’s Kyle Wiltjer. At one point, they lost to a team led by Indiana’s Yogi Ferrell.

It sounds like a worthy training ground, and Selden told DraftExpress.com he plans to be a better player this coming season for Kansas.

“Last year I had times where I was timid, I would shy away — not shy away. Timid’s not even the right word,” Selden said, deciding to re-characterize his sophomore struggles. “But I wouldn’t always be locked in. That’s probably a better word. I wouldn’t always be locked in. This year I’ve got a different mindset. I’m a lot more focused and I’m working. I’m out here having fun and just playing basketball.”

Kansas guard Wayne Selden Jr. (1) drives against Kansas State forward Nino Williams (11) during the second half, Monday, Feb. 23, 2015 at Bramlage Coliseum.

Kansas guard Wayne Selden Jr. (1) drives against Kansas State forward Nino Williams (11) during the second half, Monday, Feb. 23, 2015 at Bramlage Coliseum. by Nick Krug

Offensively, Selden’s had issues during the 2014-15 season with his shooting inside the arc. Look at these numbers from hoop-math.com:

  • Selden only made 35 of 69 attempts at the rim (50.7%)

  • Selden converted on just 28 of 89 2-point jumpers (31.5%)

Often, Selden would reach the paint — or even the rim — and fail to finish off a solid drive with a bucket. By the end of the season, the guard hit a better percentage of his 3-pointers — 46 of 124 (37.1%) — than his 2-pointers. He said he wasn’t an efficient scorer because he would get to the lane and make things more difficult than they had to be.

“But I feel like I really improved on that, just in the short time since the season ended,” Selden said. “Over in Korea and here I’ve been doing pretty well with it.”

In fact, at the World University Games Selden made 59.7% of his 2-point shots — 40 of 67 — as his offense carried the Jayhawks to an 8-0 record. He was almost unstoppable in the first seven games, making 36 of 50 (72%) of his 2-pointers, before KU played its eighth game in 10 days, everybody’s legs looked dead and he shot 4-for-17 inside the arc in a double-overtime victory over Germany in the gold-medal game.

Kansas guard Wayne Selden Jr. (1) is pulled up from the court after being buried under a dog pile of players after a Team USA double-overtime win against Germany Monday, July 13, at the World University Games in South Korea.

Kansas guard Wayne Selden Jr. (1) is pulled up from the court after being buried under a dog pile of players after a Team USA double-overtime win against Germany Monday, July 13, at the World University Games in South Korea. by Mike Yoder

Selden’s 3-point shooting didn’t suffer in South Korea, either. He made 18 of 48 from deep for 37.5%, just above what he shot for KU as a sophomore. But he hopes to improve upon that clip as a junior.

“I see myself shooting over 40 percent from three this year, much improved jump shot, and I’m real confident with it right now,” Selden said. “I feel like I can make every shot. Even if I miss a shot, I feel like the next one’s going in.”

If he can follow through with that goal and continue finishing inside, the Jayhawks should have no trouble getting back to at least the Sweet 16 for the first time since 2013. Plus, the junior will see his stock rise.

And Selden knows Bill Self needs the junior guard in an effective, assertive role, to compliment junior point guard Frank Mason III and senior forward Perry Ellis. The trio figure to carry the Jayhawks and trade off leading the team in scoring from game to game.

“Basically, me and Frank, we the real bulldogs,” Selden said. “We’re gonna run the squad this year. Perry’s gonna get buckets, obviously, because that’s what Perry does. But me and Frank, we’re the heart of the team. We’re gonna have to take over and run the show.”

In case you were wondering, DraftExpress.com’s mock NBA Draft for 2016 doesn’t include Selden. The website actually has him as a second-round pick — 52nd — in the 2017 draft (after what will be his senior season).

KU freshman big man Cheick Diallo is listed as the No. 15 pick in the first round for 2016, and sophomore wing Svi Mykhailiuk is two spots behind him, at No. 17. Jayhawks senior forward Perry Ellis isn’t listed in the top 60 for the 30-team, two-round draft.

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