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Avengers: Bill Self’s KU teams never have suffered a Big 12 sweep

Kansas head coach Bill Self pulls in the Jayhawks for a huddle with seconds remaining in overtime, Monday, Feb. 13, 2017 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas head coach Bill Self pulls in the Jayhawks for a huddle with seconds remaining in overtime, Monday, Feb. 13, 2017 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

As astonishing as the Kansas basketball team’s do-or-die comeback was in the final minutes Monday night against West Virginia, the Jayhawks’ absurd rally and overtime victory helped preserve an equally staggering example of the program’s dominance.

The Mountaineers, up 14 points with less than three minutes to play in regulation, had a chance to do something no team has pulled off since Bill Self became the head coach at Kansas before the 2003-2004 season: sweep KU.

That’s right. No Self-coached Kansas team has ever suffered two regular-season losses to the same Big 12 opponent. The Jayhawks, in the 14th season of the Self era, now have played 88 home-and-home series. KU has swept 60 of them, split 28 and never come away 0-2.

As one might predict from the program’s toughness-preaching coach, Self said after KU’s 84-80 overtime win against WVU he and his players take pride in the fact that Big 12 foes just don’t sweep his teams.

“Sure we do. They probably should’ve,” Self added, of WVU ending the sweep-less streak this season. “They were better than us in Morgantown and they were better than us tonight for the most part — for the large part of the game.”

However, with the Allen Fieldhouse crowd growing more rambunctious by the second as the No. 3 Jayhawks (23-3 overall, 11-2 Big 12) chopped away at the West Virginia lead, KU preserved a less-discussed aspect of its conference dominance. What’s more, it marked the fifth occasion in Self’s tenure that KU thwarted a sweep with an overtime victory.

The last team to sweep Kansas was Iowa State, in 2001.

Below is a rundown of the Jayhawks’ avenging ways over the course of the past 14 seasons. When Big 12 opponents won the first meeting with Kansas, Self’s teams are a perfect 16-0 in rematches.

2004

Lost at Iowa State, 68-61 | Won rematch, 90-89 (OT)

Lost at Nebraska, 74-55 | Won rematch, 78-67

2006

Lost at home to Kansas State, 59-55 | Won rematch at K-State, 66-52

Lost at Missouri, 89-86 (OT) | Won rematch, 79-46

2008

Lost at Kansas State, 84-75 | Won rematch, 88-74

2009

Lost at Missouri, 62-60 | Won rematch, 90-65

2012

Lost at Missouri, 74-71 | Won rematch, 87-86 (OT)

2013

Lost at home to Oklahoma State, 85-80 | Won rematch at Oklahoma State, 68-67 (2OT)

Lost at TCU, 62-55 | Won rematch, 74-48

2014

Lost at Texas, 81-69 | Won rematch, 85-54

2015

Lost at Iowa State, 86-81 | Won rematch, 89-76

Lost at West Virginia, 62-61 | Won rematch, 76-69 (OT)

2016

Lost at West Virginia, 74-63 | Won rematch, 75-65

Lost at Oklahoma State, 86-67 | Won rematch, 94-67

Lost at Iowa State, 85-72 | Won rematch, 85-78

2017

Lost at West Virginia, 85-69 | Won rematch, 84-80 (OT)

West Virginia forward Nathan Adrian (11) reacts after losing a ball off of his knee during overtime, Monday, Feb. 13, 2017 at Allen Fieldhouse.

West Virginia forward Nathan Adrian (11) reacts after losing a ball off of his knee during overtime, Monday, Feb. 13, 2017 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

In the old days of the Big 12, when Kansas only played the teams from the south division once in the regular season, the Jayhawks didn’t even encounter any potential sweeps in 2005, 2007, 2010 or 2011. Still, in both 2008 and 2011, KU earned retribution for losses to Texas in the Big 12 Tournament.

Since the round-robin, 18-game schedule went into effect in 2012, KU has overcome a potential 0-2 mark against a league team at least once every season.

The Jayhawks’ latest star freshman, Josh Jackson, obviously has only been around for a few weeks worth of Big 12 battles. But the culture Self long ago established was apparent to Jackson and his teammates on Big Monday, with a West Virginia sweep in play.

“Sometimes it’s not our night, like tonight I don’t really think it was,” Jackson said after chipping in 14 points, 11 rebounds, five steals and three assists. “But you’ve just gotta get it done on the defensive end. As long as we make our opponents play bad, I think we’ll be fine.”

Now 408-86 as KU’s head coach, Self’s teams thrive on pulling off the preposterous, particularly at Allen Fieldhouse, where he improved to 218-10. On the rare occasions when an opponent looks like it has KU’s number, that’s when Self can employ atypical tactics.

“I didn’t talk once about the league race. I didn’t talk about any of that stuff,” Self said of his message leading up to the West Virginia rematch. “All I told ’em was, ‘You’ve got a chance to play a team that put a pretty good knot on your head the last time we played.’ And they were motivated. I think they just tried too hard early on in the game.”

— Addendum: On the subject of losing twice to the same team in a season, it has happened in the Self era — just not in terms of a regular-season sweep. Below are the teams who pulled off multiple victories over Self teams during one campaign, over the past 14 years.

2004

Lost at Texas 82-67 | Lost Big 12 Tournament rematch, 64-60, in Dallas

2009

Lost at Michigan State, 75-62 | Lost Sweet 16 rematch, 67-62, in Indianapolis

2012

Lost to Kentucky, 75-65, in New York | Lost NCAA title game rematch, 67-59, in New Orleans

2015

Iowa State, after splitting in the regular season, won Round 3, 70-66, in Big 12 title game, in Kansas City

Reply 2 comments from Zabudda Mike Greer

In search of another league title, Jayhawks quickly reminded it’s not easy to win in Big 12

Kansas guard Frank Mason III (0) is fouled hard by TCU guard Desmond Bane (1) during the first half, Friday, Dec. 30, 2016 at Schollmaier Arena in Fort Worth, Texas

Kansas guard Frank Mason III (0) is fouled hard by TCU guard Desmond Bane (1) during the first half, Friday, Dec. 30, 2016 at Schollmaier Arena in Fort Worth, Texas by Nick Krug

Kansas basketball coach Bill Self and veteran Jayhawks such as Frank Mason III, who have been through more conference encounters than they can count off the top of their heads, will tell you there is nothing easy about winning the Big 12 — even if the Jayhawks have done so 12 years in a row.

The first couple of stops on what many imagined would be an uneventful journey to KU’s 13th consecutive league crown, though, back up the case made by those responsible for the conference dominance some observers have taken as a foregone conclusion.

The No. 3-ranked Jayhawks couldn’t ever completely bury TCU on the road in their Big 12 opener, and it took a controversial buzzer-beater at the end of regulation for them to defeat rival Kansas State inside Allen Fieldhouse.

Victories, of course, often are considered more important than the minutia that made them possible. But Self said opening league play with back-to-back taxing outings should give his players something to think about as they prepare for a Saturday home game against Texas Tech (12-2 overall, 1-1 Big 12) and the next couple of months in front of them.

“But I think there’s been a lot of nice reminders for our guys on just how hard it is to win,” the 14th-year KU coach said, “and especially in a league where — I mean, this is no disrespect to anybody — but I think most, in fans’ minds, think if you go to TCU, based on the past few years, that that should be a game that you should for sure win. And as coaches, we know that we're gonna have to play to win, because they’re so much improved.”

This week, the Big 12 has three teams — No. 2 Baylor, No. 3 KU and No. 7 West Virginia — ranked among the top seven in the country in the AP poll. Even the unranked teams have generated some buzz just two games into the conference schedule. The Red Raiders knocked off WVU on Tuesday, in Lubbock, Texas, on the same night K-State had a chance to take the lead in the final seconds at Kansas. The next day, Iowa State lost by two at Baylor. Eight of the league’s 10 teams have at least one Big 12 victory already, and only Kansas and Baylor enter the weekend without a conference loss.

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) look to pass during the first half, Tuesday, Jan. 3, 2017 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) look to pass during the first half, Tuesday, Jan. 3, 2017 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

KenPom.com ranks the Big 12’s eight best teams among the top 40 in the country: No. 2 WVU, No. 6 BU, No. 7 KU, No. 27 ISU, No. 28 Tech, No. 30 K-State, No. 38 TCU and No. 39 Oklahoma State. And even the Cowboys lost at No. 79 Texas, which has struggled to a 7-7 start in Shaka Smart’s second season.

“Well, I think there's no question that our league is underrated,” Self said, “and it's rated very high, and it's still underrated. I think you could say, you could make a strong case, that the ACC has more good teams in their league than anybody else. But that's also in large part the numbers are so much bigger. They've got five more teams … to pick from.

“But I think our league is a monster,” Self continued. “And you know, coaches after games sometimes can be emotional and mad or happy, and there's been a time or two I've been that way, as well. But the TCU win was a good win. They're gonna beat a lot of people at TCU.”

An even stronger argument along those lines could be made for K-State (12-2, 1-1), and Self said the Jayhawks (13-1, 2-0) don’t have to apologize for eking out a win against the Wildcats — even if KU avoided overtime because the officials didn’t whistle Svi Mykhailiuk for traveling.

“Although I didn't think we played well, I think Kansas State's a really good team. I think they did some things that didn't allow us to play well,” Self explained. “So I think winning at home is going to be a premium again. But I don't think the home wins are gonna come as easy as a lot of people perceive them to be as they have in year's past, because there’s just more good teams in our league.”

Kansas guard Josh Jackson (11) pulls a rebound from Kansas State forward Wesley Iwundu (25) and Kansas State forward Dean Wade (32) during the second half, Tuesday, Jan. 3, 2017 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas guard Josh Jackson (11) pulls a rebound from Kansas State forward Wesley Iwundu (25) and Kansas State forward Dean Wade (32) during the second half, Tuesday, Jan. 3, 2017 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

To his point, the latest NCAA Tournament projections from ESPN’s Joe Lunardi place six Big 12 teams in the field: Kansas, Baylor, West Virginia, Iowa State, Oklahoma State and TCU. Plus, Lunardi lists Texas Tech among the “first four out” and K-State in the “next four out” — so eight league teams, at least in early January, are in the mix for March Madness.

Mason, KU’s senior point guard who is averaging 18.5 points and 5.5 assists in Big 12 action, said there are easy lessons to take away from his team’s two narrow conference wins.

“Even when we’re not playing good we still have to rebound the ball and make the other team play as bad as we are,” Mason began. “You know, we have to stay coachable, keep ptichin' the ball ahead, execute on the offensive end. And we have to make free throws, and just make the right play, make the extra pass.”

Quickly this season, the Jayhawks have been reminded it’s not easy to win in the Big 12. Their coach, as one might expect, plans on hammering that message home, and letting the players know there are no certainties in league play.

“And I think that's the one thing that we really need to sell to all our players, and I think that other coaches will sell to their respective players is that, hey, everybody's better than they were last year — for the most part,” Self said. “Everybody's better. So don't look at an opponent based on what happened last year. Everybody's improved. Everybody's added some nice pieces.”

Reply 9 comments from Zabudda Len Shaffer Glen Pius Waldman Roger Ortega Jayhawkmarshall The_muser Brett McCabe

Frank Mason III one of top candidates for Big 12 Player of Year next season

Kansas Jayhawks guard Frank Mason III (0) gets to the bucket past Maryland guard Rasheed Sulaimon (0) during the first half, Thursday, March 24, 2016 at KFC Yum! Center in Louisville, Kentucky.

Kansas Jayhawks guard Frank Mason III (0) gets to the bucket past Maryland guard Rasheed Sulaimon (0) during the first half, Thursday, March 24, 2016 at KFC Yum! Center in Louisville, Kentucky. by Nick Krug

Perhaps it is far too early to claim Player A will beat out Player B and Player C for some college basketball award that will be handed out 10 months from now. Maybe we should save such discussions for weeks before the season starts, instead of months.

Whatever your take on that front, it is at least noteworthy that those debates already are taking place in some circles, and a Kansas veteran might be in line for some major hardware by the end of the 2016-17 season.

While looking ahead to next year in the Big 12, NBC Sports predicts not only a 13th consecutive regular-season championship for Bill Self’s Jayhawks, but also a Player of the Year honor for senior-to-be Frank Mason III.

It’s not too farfetched of a conclusion when you consider all the talent the Big 12 has lost from this past season.

All five members of the 2016 All-Big 12 first team won’t be around next year, thanks to Texas point guard Isaiah Taylor unexpectedly entering the NBA Draft, joining Buddy Hield, Georges Niang, Perry Ellis and Taurean Prince as professionals.

Only Iowa State point guard Monté Morris and Mason return from the All-Big 12 second team, with Wayne Selden Jr. and Devin Williams turning pro, and Jaysean Paige done with his college career.

Even the all-conference third team featured three players who won’t be back next season: seniors Rico Gathers, Isaiah Cousins and Ryan Spangler. Baylor’s Johnathan Motley and Wesley Iwundu of Kansas State will have a crack at making bigger names for themselves and contending for a first-team spot in 2017, or perhaps even challenging the Big 12’s other top talents for the honor of Player of the Year.

So if Mason is one of the top contenders for the coveted award next season, who else might push him or surpass him in the race?

Iowa State guard Monte Morris (11) gets to the bucket against Kansas guard Wayne Selden Jr. (1) during the first  half, Monday, Jan. 25, 2016 at Hilton Coliseum in Ames, Iowa.

Iowa State guard Monte Morris (11) gets to the bucket against Kansas guard Wayne Selden Jr. (1) during the first half, Monday, Jan. 25, 2016 at Hilton Coliseum in Ames, Iowa. by Nick Krug

You have to start with Morris. The Cyclones, like the rest of the mostly rebuilding Big 12, honestly, don’t seem likely to threaten KU for a league championship. However, if ISU can finish in the top three or four and Morris puts up big numbers — and he’ll have a chance to lead Iowa State in scoring while still distributing as much as ever — the Cyclones’ lead guard could turn out to be the favorite.

Athletic Baylor big man Motley could become one of the league’s breakout stars next season, now that Prince and Gathers won’t be part of the Bears’ frontcourt.

Looking at other younger players in the conference poised for a leap in productivity, one would think West Virginia’s Jevon Carter will become Bob Huggins’ featured guard next season, and the Mountaineers seem to remain competitive in the Big 12 regardless of who Huggins puts on the floor.

Texas guard Kerwin Roach Jr. (12) drives inside and shoots over TCU forward Devonta Abron (23) during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game, Saturday, Jan. 9, 2016, in Fort Worth, Texas. (AP Photo/Ron Jenkins)

Texas guard Kerwin Roach Jr. (12) drives inside and shoots over TCU forward Devonta Abron (23) during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game, Saturday, Jan. 9, 2016, in Fort Worth, Texas. (AP Photo/Ron Jenkins)

With all the upperclassmen Shaka Smart is losing at Texas, a blossoming player will have to carry the load. Here’s a vote for Kerwin Roach Jr. emerging as a havoc-inflicting guard. The Longhorns might be a year or two away from really challenging KU for a Big 12 title, but next season Texas will start looking more like a Smart VCU team and less like a Rick Barnes team.

Implausible as it sounds, Oklahoma State, which finished ninth in the Big 12 in Travis Ford’s final season as head coach, might have a pair of dark horse candidates for player of the year. If either veteran Phil Forte III (who only played 3 games last season after suffering a ligament tear in an elbow) or young dynamo Jawun Evans put up eye-popping enough numbers and new coach Brad Underwood gets the Cowboys back into the top half of the league, don’t count out one of these explosive guards.

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) delivers on a lob jam before Baylor guard Al Freeman (25) during the first half, Friday, March 11, 2016 at Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo.

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) delivers on a lob jam before Baylor guard Al Freeman (25) during the first half, Friday, March 11, 2016 at Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo. by Nick Krug

If you think about it, though, Mason’s toughest challenger in the race for Big 12 Player of the Year just might be in his own locker room. Should the Jayhawks roll through the conference as expected it would be hard to make a case for a player from another school winning. But it isn’t too difficult to see Devonté Graham becoming just as legitimate a candidate as Mason for the league’s top individual honor.

Plus, can we really count incoming KU freshman Josh Jackson out of this conversation? Probably not at this point. Should Jackson indeed come in and essentially play as much as Selden did this year on the wing, while at least matching the freshman-year production of Andrew Wiggins, Jackson would deserve some consideration, too.

If Self has the team dominating all season, the discussion might not be if a KU player will win Big 12 Player of the Year. The better question could be: which one?

Reply 3 comments from Steve Macy Plasticjhawk The_muser

Five potential obstacles in KU’s quest for Big 12 postseason crown

Baylor forward Johnathan Motley (5) extends to defend against a shot from Kansas forward Perry Ellis (34) during the first half, Tuesday, Feb. 23, 2016 at Ferrell Center in Waco, Texas.

Baylor forward Johnathan Motley (5) extends to defend against a shot from Kansas forward Perry Ellis (34) during the first half, Tuesday, Feb. 23, 2016 at Ferrell Center in Waco, Texas. by Nick Krug

It’s difficult enough to win three college basketball games in three days. Beating three different Big 12 teams in three days? Now that’s a superb accomplishment — even if you’re the No. 1-ranked team in the nation.

The Jayhawks (27-4) are in Kansas City, Mo., this week trying to add to their already striking résumé by winning the 2016 Big 12 Tournament. They last left Sprint Center as tourney champions in 2013. Each of the past two seasons, Iowa State took home the title, defeating KU in the 2014 semifinals and 2015 championship game.

Even with those losses, 13th-year Kansas coach Bill Self has a 24-6 record in Big 12 Tournament games. When the conference postseason wars are played at Sprint Center, Self’s record is even better: 16-3.

Self, who has led Kansas to 6 postseason Big 12 championships, knows nothing about this weekend will be easy for the Jayhawks, even if they won the regular-season title by two games and haven’t lost since Jan. 25, at Iowa State.

“I think it's got to be — and I've heard other people say it — it's got to be as good a postseason conference tournament as there is in the country,” Self said earlier this week. “I think the competitive nature of it, everybody wants to show that they are the best. I think that drives it.”

With all of that in mind, here are five potential obstacles the Jayhawks might have to overcome in the days ahead in order to extend their 11-game winning streak to 14 and add another trophy to the program’s many cases.

More poor free-throw shooting

Kansas guard Frank Mason III (0) hits the second of two free throws with 8.6 seconds remaining in the third overtime, Monday, Jan. 4, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas guard Frank Mason III (0) hits the second of two free throws with 8.6 seconds remaining in the third overtime, Monday, Jan. 4, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

Entering the postseason, the Jayhawks haven’t been great at the free-throw line. They’re hitting 70% on the year — which ranks 6th in the Big 12 and 163rd in the nation.

Even more troubling, Kansas has shot below 70% in four of its last five games:

- 18 of 30 at Kansas State: 60%

- 12 of 17 at Baylor: 70.6%

- 10 of 15 vs. Texas Tech: 66.7%

- 11 of 24 at Texas: 45.8%

- 9 of 15 vs. Iowa State: 60%

Now that it’s the postseason, Self said missing free throws could be disastrous.

“But we've got to make them. You know what, we've been a good free-throw shooting team when it counted,” Self said. “We haven't been a very good free-throw shooting it seems like to me when it didn't count, so maybe that's a positive sign. But certainly that could bite us. You don't make free throws in the postseason, the chances of you advancing against a comparable team is not very good.”

So who are KU’s best free-throw shooters when it count? Here are the individual numbers for free throws taken in the last 5 minutes of a game or overtime (as a team, KU shoots 70.3% in those situations, and opponents have made 74.1%):

Brannen Greene: 9/11, 90%

Devonté Graham: 20/24, 83.3%

Perry Ellis: 14/17, 82.4%

Frank Mason III: 40/54, 74.1%

Svi Mykhailiuk: 5/7, 71.4%

Cheick Diallo: 7/10, 70%

Landen Lucas: 11/18, 61.1%

Wayne Selden Jr.: 15/25, 60%

Jamari Traylor: 3/6, 50%

Hunter Mickelson: 1/3, 33.3%

Carlton Bragg: 0/0

In each of KU’s 4 losses this season, the opposition had a better shooting night at the free-throw line.

Opponents pounding the offensive glass

Kansas forward Cheick Diallo (13) fights for a rebound with Iowa State forward Jameel McKay (1) during the first half on Saturday, March 5, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas forward Cheick Diallo (13) fights for a rebound with Iowa State forward Jameel McKay (1) during the first half on Saturday, March 5, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

The Jayhawks have finished with fewer offensive rebounds than their opponent in 6 of their last 10 games. During that same stretch KU got out-scored in second-chance points five times and won the margin by 1 on 2 occasions.

In 9 of KU’s 18 Big 12 games, they lost second-chance points. Sometimes, KU’s first-shot defense leads to those opportunities (see: Texas missed 44 field goals, shot 30.2% and gathered 18 offensive rebounds, leading to 13 second-chance points). But it’s still an area of concern, because second-chance attempts often come from point-blank range, meaning easy points.

In Norman, Okla., the Sooners scored 22 second-chance points on 15 offensive rebounds. Looking at KU’s last five games, four opponents scored double digits via offensive rebounds: K-State (12), Baylor (14), Texas Tech (14) and Iowa State (13).

Beware of Shaka

Texas head coach Shaka Smart, right, celebrates with Ryan McClurg, left, and Javan Felix, center, and Cameron Ridley, center rear, after beating North Carolina in an NCAA college basketball game, Saturday, Dec. 12, 2015, in Austin, Texas. Texas won 84-82. (AP Photo/Michael Thomas)

Texas head coach Shaka Smart, right, celebrates with Ryan McClurg, left, and Javan Felix, center, and Cameron Ridley, center rear, after beating North Carolina in an NCAA college basketball game, Saturday, Dec. 12, 2015, in Austin, Texas. Texas won 84-82. (AP Photo/Michael Thomas)

Now, there is no guarantee that Kansas will run into Texas in the Big 12 semifinals. Obviously, both KU (versus K-State) and UT (versus Baylor) will have to handle their business to make that happen. But the past success of first-year Longhorns coach Shaka Smart makes one think a UT-KU meeting will start things off Friday night at Sprint. And that Self’s Jayhawks shouldn’t take the ’Horns lightly — despite a regular-season sweep.

In his six seasons at VCU, Smart’s Rams won two conference tournament titles (Colonial Athletic Association Tournament in 2012, and Atlantic-10 Tournament in 2015) and posted a 15-4 record.

What’s more, VCU won at least two games at every conference tournament in Smart’s time there.

2010 (CAA) 2-1

2011 (CAA) 2-1

2012 (CAA) 3-0

2013 (A-10) 2-1

2014 (A-10) 2-1

2015 (A-10) 4-0

Smart has a way of getting the best out of his players in March. And there is a chance massive, 6-foot-10 center Cameron Ridley will be back for the Longhorns this weekend.

Sure, KU blew out Texas a little more than a week ago. But they call it March Madness for a reason. Sometimes the unthinkable plays out right in front of your eyes.

An off night for Devonté Graham

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) pulls up for a three against Oklahoma State guard Tyree Griffin (2) during the second half, Monday, Feb. 15, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) pulls up for a three against Oklahoma State guard Tyree Griffin (2) during the second half, Monday, Feb. 15, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

The youngest member of KU’s starting five, sophomore Devonté Graham has emerged as a reliable scorer (11.2 points per game, 45.9% shooting) and the Jayhawks’ best high-volume 3-point marksman.

The 6-foot-2 guard from Raleigh, N.C., has made 43.7% of his 135 attempts from beyond the arc (second to Wayne Selden Jr.’s 156 tries). While Perry Elis (45.6% on 57 attempts) and Brannen Greene (51.7% on 58 shots from downtown) are better percentage-wise, Graham has been more productive.

KU has enough depth and talent that an off night from one player shouldn’t mean doom for the team, but Graham has been below his normal production in the Jayhawks’ four losses this season.

- vs. Michigan State: 4 points, 1/9 FGs, 0/4 3s, 2/2 FTs

- at West Virginia: 7 points, 2/7 FGs, 2/3 3s, 1/4 FTs

- at Oklahoma State: 10 points, 4/9 FGs, 1/4 3s, 1/1 FTs

- at Iowa State: 7 points, 3/7 FGs, 1/3 3s, 0/0 FTs

A below-average outing from Graham doesn’t automatically mean a KU loss. He had three single-digit point totals in February, and Kansas still won every game last month.

It’s just Graham seems to have an infectious energy that propels Kansas when he is playing well. If he goes cold in a game and other problems pop up for KU, that could mean trouble.

Can KU respond to adversity?

Iowa State guard Monte Morris (11) gets to the bucket against Kansas guard Wayne Selden Jr. (1) during the first  half, Monday, Jan. 25, 2016 at Hilton Coliseum in Ames, Iowa.

Iowa State guard Monte Morris (11) gets to the bucket against Kansas guard Wayne Selden Jr. (1) during the first half, Monday, Jan. 25, 2016 at Hilton Coliseum in Ames, Iowa. by Nick Krug

KU has been on such a roll, what happens if an opponent gets hot and the Jayhawks find themselves down by double digits?

That hasn’t happened to Kansas since Jan. 25, at Iowa State. That’s a long time to go without playing from behind while in legitimate trouble.

Will the players buckle down and get stops? Will pride take over and validate just how good KU is?

Or will the physical and mental grind of the regular season finally catch up with the players in such a scenario? In the back of their minds, they know a No. 1 seed in the NCAA Tournament already is essentially wrapped up. Will they have the fire to exert extra energy with a big comeback if it doing so doesn’t have an impact on where they stand entering the Big Dance? Maybe we find out. Maybe we don’t.

For what it’s worth, KU has a pair of neutral-floor recoveries on its schedule this season. Kansas came back from a 14-point deficit to beat Oregon State at Sprint Center in December. Before that, the Jayhawks recovered from a 10-point hole against Vanderbilt to win the Maui Invitational final.





Reply 6 comments from Cassadys Mcgirl Jaylark Steve Corder Jayhawkmarshall Dannyboy4hawks

These guys again: Cyclones boast one of nation’s elite offenses entering rematch at KU

Iowa State guard Monte Morris (11) lofts a shot over Kansas forward Landen Lucas (33) and guard Devonte' Graham (4) during the first half, Monday, Jan. 25, 2016 at Hilton Coliseum in Ames, Iowa.

Iowa State guard Monte Morris (11) lofts a shot over Kansas forward Landen Lucas (33) and guard Devonte' Graham (4) during the first half, Monday, Jan. 25, 2016 at Hilton Coliseum in Ames, Iowa. by Nick Krug

There aren’t many college basketball players that can say they have won four of the past five times they have faced Kansas. In fact, the only ones who can say that about a Bill Self-coached KU team are Iowa State’s current crop of veterans.

With a pair of Big 12 Tournament victories and two more wins coming at Hilton Coliseum, the Cyclones have proven they have the fire power to not only hang with the Jayhawks, but knock them off. Winning at Allen Fieldhouse Saturday afternoon — on Perry Ellis’ Senior Day? That would be a next-level accomplishment. Iowa State has lost its last 10 trips to Lawrence.

When the 2015-16 schedule came out, this KU-ISU matchup seemed like one that could decide the Big 12 championship. However, KU already wrapped up its 12th straight title and ISU has experienced more drop-off than expected following the departure of former coach Fred Hoiberg.

No. 21 Iowa State (21-9 overall, 10-7 Big 12) and first-year ISU coach Steve Prohm still have plenty to play for. Heading into Saturday, ISU could earn anywhere from a No. 3 seed to a No. 6 seed at the upcoming Big 12 Tournament, in Kansas City, Mo.

And there is the less obvious incentive of ISU trying to become the first Big 12 team to beat a Self-coached KU team both at home and on the road in the same season. While that’s probably not something floating around in the minds of Georges Niang and Monté Morris, just getting a win at Allen Fieldhouse is motivation enough.

So how could the Cyclones pull off the upset at No. 1 KU (26-4, 14-3)? They’d better score a ton of points if they want to have a shot.

ISU (82.2 points per game this season, 1st in Big 12) has led the league in scoring each of the last three years. If the Cyclones can do that again they would join Kansas (2000-03) as the only teams to lead the Big 12 four consecutive seasons.

Some other interesting Iowa State offensive numbers to consider:

- In the 2nd halves of the last 8 games ISU is shooting 57.8% from the floor and 42.3% on 3-pointers.

- In 4 of those last 8 games ISU has shot 64% of better in the 2nd half.

- The Cyclones have made 10 or more 3-pointers in 6 of the last 9 games.

- ISU is shooting 57.1% on 2-point field goals, which ranks 4th nationally.

- Iowa State has made 50.3% of its shots on the year, ranking 2nd in the nation to St. Mary’s, which has hit 50.9%. (KU ranks 8th at 49.3%).

Defense has been ISU’s issue all season, particularly with the absence of injured Naz Long. The Cyclones are 3-8 when their opponent gets 80 or more points. They also rank last in Big 12 games in points allowed (76.9) and 6th in FG% defense (44.2%). KU leads the conference, holding Big 12 foes to 38.7% shooting.

While ISU ranks 2nd in the nation — behind only Michigan State — in adjusted offensive efficiency, according to college hoops math wizard Ken Pomeroy, of kenpom.com, the Cyclones are 111th in adjusted defensive efficiency.

Iowa State certainly will extend its run of NCAA Tournament appearances to five straight years, improving on its current program record. But the Cyclones’ defensive issues might be too much to overcome against a hot Kansas team that can match them basket for basket.

With all of those factors in mind, here are the Cyclones the Jayhawks have to worry about as they try to close out the regular season with an 11th straight win.

IOWA STATE STARTERS

No. 31 — F Georges Niang | 6-8, sr.

Iowa State’s Georges Niang (31) drives against Cincinnati’s Coreontae DeBerry (22) during the Cyclones’ 81-79 victory over the Bearcats Tuesday, Dec. 22 in Cincinnati. Niang and the Cyclones are among the challengers to Kansas’ streak of 11-straight Big 12 regular season titles.

Iowa State’s Georges Niang (31) drives against Cincinnati’s Coreontae DeBerry (22) during the Cyclones’ 81-79 victory over the Bearcats Tuesday, Dec. 22 in Cincinnati. Niang and the Cyclones are among the challengers to Kansas’ streak of 11-straight Big 12 regular season titles. by Associated Press

— Jan. 25 vs. KU: 19 points, 8/17 FGs, 0/5 3s, 3/3 FTs, 6 rebounds, 3 assists, 3 turnovers in 33 minutes

  • One of the nation’s better all-around offensive threats, senior Georges Niang (19.3 points) is the only player in the country averaging at least 19 points and 6 rebounds, while shooting 50% or better from the floor and 80% or better at the free-throw line. The last player to pull that off was Creighton’s Doug McDermott (2013-14).

  • The winningest player in ISU history (96 wins), Niang doesn’t just score, he sets up his teammates for baskets, averaging 3.2 assists in his final season. He’s the only player to rank in the top 12 in the Big 12 in scoring, rebounding and assists.

  • In Big 12 games, Niang is shooting 55% from the floor and 35.8% from three-point range (24 of 67).

  • Niang is one of six players in the nation hitting at least 60% of his 2-point shot attempts.

  • In his last 4 games, Niang is shooting 66% from the field.

No. 11 — PG Monté Morris | 6-3, jr.

Iowa State guard Monte Morris (11) looks to pass around Kansas guard Frank Mason III (0) during the first half, Monday, Jan. 25, 2016 at Hilton Coliseum in Ames, Iowa.

Iowa State guard Monte Morris (11) looks to pass around Kansas guard Frank Mason III (0) during the first half, Monday, Jan. 25, 2016 at Hilton Coliseum in Ames, Iowa. by Nick Krug

— Jan. 25 vs. KU: 21 points, 7/14 FGs, 2/4 3s, 5/7 FTs, 4 rebounds (2 offensive), 9 assists, 0 turnovers, 1 steal in 40 minutes

  • A finalist for the Bob Cousy Award, junior point guard Monté Morris (14.3 points) leads the Big 12 in assists (7.2) and assist-to-turnover ratio (4.1).

  • Morris is on pace to pass Jeff Hornacek (6.8 assists) as the program’s all-time single-season assist leader.

  • The Big 12’s active leader in career assists (525), Morris also has more career steals (163) than any other current players in the league.

  • Morris has looked to score more frequently this season than he did in the past and his 50.4% shooting from the field leads all Big 12 guards.

  • In Big 12 games, Morris has made 22 of 51 from 3-point range (43.1%).

  • A workhorse, Morris has played every minute in 9 games this season.

  • 4th in the Big 12 with 1.8 steals a game, he has recorded at least 1 steal in 26 of 30 games this year.

No. 1 — F Jameel McKay | 6-9, sr.

Kansas forward Carlton Bragg Jr. (15) disrupts a dunk attempt by Iowa State forward Jameel McKay (1) during the first half, Monday, Jan. 25, 2016 at Hilton Coliseum in Ames, Iowa.

Kansas forward Carlton Bragg Jr. (15) disrupts a dunk attempt by Iowa State forward Jameel McKay (1) during the first half, Monday, Jan. 25, 2016 at Hilton Coliseum in Ames, Iowa. by Nick Krug

— Jan. 25 vs. KU: 6 points, 2/4 FGs, 2/2 FTs, 5 rebounds, 1 assist, 1 block in 27 minutes

  • Senior big man Jameel McKay (11.5 points) gives Iowa State an athletic presence in the paint and above the rim. McKay leads the team with 8.9 rebounds and 1.8 blocks.

  • In his last 6 games, McKay, hampered by some soreness in the first meeting with KU, is averaging 2.3 blocks.

  • Starting to return to form, McKay put up 14 points and 17 boards against Kansas State last week, marking his first double-double since the first week of January.

  • McKay has shot 50% or better from the field in 41 of his 52 career games for ISU. This season, McKay is shooting 58.9%. In Big 12 games, that mark is 54.3%.

  • ISU went 4-3 without McKay in the starting lineup this season.

  • Averaging 2.9 offensive rebounds a game in Big 12 action.

No. 2 — F Abdel Nader | 6-6, sr.

Iowa State forward Abdel Nader (2) throws a backdoor pass around Kansas forward Perry Ellis (34) and guard Wayne Selden Jr. (1) during the first half, Monday, Jan. 25, 2016 at Hilton Coliseum in Ames, Iowa. Also pictured is Kansas guard Frank Mason III (0).

Iowa State forward Abdel Nader (2) throws a backdoor pass around Kansas forward Perry Ellis (34) and guard Wayne Selden Jr. (1) during the first half, Monday, Jan. 25, 2016 at Hilton Coliseum in Ames, Iowa. Also pictured is Kansas guard Frank Mason III (0). by Nick Krug

— Jan. 25 vs. KU: 17 points, 6/9 FGs, 3/3 3s, 2/2 FTs, 3 rebounds, 3 assists, 1 turnover, 4 steals in 36 minutes

  • As he closes in on the end of his college career, senior Abdel Nader (13.5 points, 5.1 rebounds) is getting hot at the right time. Nader is averaging 19.2 points in the last 5 games.

  • In his 5-game run, Nader has made 47.4% of his 3-pointers, hitting 18 total — including 3 games with 5 successful bombs.

  • In his first 25 games of the season, Nader made 26 total 3’s and shot 31.3% from deep.

  • Shooting 48.5% from the floor in Big 12 games.

  • Only dud in his last 5 games was a 4-point performance vs. K-State, when Nader shot 0-for-6 from 3-point range. He scored between 19 and 26 points in the other 4, against Baylor, TCU, West Virginia and Oklahoma State.

No. 21 — G Matt Thomas | 6-4, jr.

None by Cyclone Basketball

— Jan. 25 vs. KU: 13 points, 5/10 FGs, 3/6 3s, 6 rebounds, 1 assist, 3 turnovers, 4 steals in 37 minutes

  • Odds are junior sharpshooter Matt Thomas (10.7 points, 4.5 rebounds) is going to make at least one 3-pointer. He has done so in 20 consecutive games.

  • With 2.5 3-pointers made per game this year, Thomas ranks (distant) 2nd to Buddy Hield, of Oklahoma, who makes 4.2 a game.

  • Shooting 43.2% from long range on the year, Thomas’ productivity coincides with ISU success. The Cyclones are 11-1 when he scores at least 12 points as a starter.

  • Thomas has nailed 3 or more 3-pointers in 9 of the last 13 games.

  • Also ISU’s best free-throw shooter, Thomas has made 30 of 33 at the line this season (90.9%).

IOWA STATE BENCH

No. 30 — G Deonte Burton | 6-4, jr.

None by Big 12 Conference

— Jan. 25 vs. KU: 9 points, 4/5 FGs, 1/1 3s, 0/1 FTs, 4 rebounds, 2 assists, 1 steal, 4 fouls in 17 minutes off the bench

  • A transfer from Marquette (just like McKay), junior Deonte Burton (10.0 points, 3.9 rebounds) is ISU’s 6th man and the real productivity off the bench begins and ends with him.

  • Burton doesn’t take as many 3-pointers as Niang, Morris, Nader or Thomas, but he has connected on 10 of 23 (43.5%) in Big 12 games.

  • Shooting 52.8% from the field in conference games — good. And 59.5% at the free-throw line — bad.

Reply 7 comments from Onlyoneuinkansas Humpy Helsel Dirk Medema Goku Zabudda Pius Waldman Joe Ross

Which of KU’s 12 straight Big 12 title seasons stands out as the best?

Kansas forward Perry Ellis finishes off the net as his teammates and the fieldhouse stand to watch as the Jayhawks celebrate locking up a share of their twelfth-straight Big 12 title following their 67-58 win over the Red Raiders, Saturday, Feb. 27, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas forward Perry Ellis finishes off the net as his teammates and the fieldhouse stand to watch as the Jayhawks celebrate locking up a share of their twelfth-straight Big 12 title following their 67-58 win over the Red Raiders, Saturday, Feb. 27, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

The longer the streak extends the more the question gets asked: Which season in the Kansas Jayhawks’ run of consecutive Big 12 regular-season championships was the most difficult or most impressive?

It’s a great debate for those that follow the now 12-time defending kings of the conference. And every year about this time, with the regular season almost over, the man who coached each of those title teams is asked to compare, contrast and find some way to encapsulate the various challenges that come up year after year.

Just last week, KU coach Bill Self said of this season’s competition: “I think there's more really, really good teams in our league than there ever has been.”

That might turn out to be true. The latest Bracketology projections indicate the Big 12 could easily end up sending seven teams to the NCAA Tournament.

Think about that. No. 1-ranked KU (26-4 overall, 14-3 Big 12) already has won the conference outright and has a 2-game lead in the loss column on second-place West Virginia — in a conference where the best teams play 12 games against tourney-worthy competition. The Mountaineers still have a home game with Texas Tech and a road date with Baylor left to play this week. Let’s say WVU splits those. As long as Kansas defends its home court Saturday against Iowa State, the Jayhawks would win the Big 12 by 3 games.

The 2016 season really might go down as the most impressive in the run, depending on what transpires in the future.

There are plenty of factors that go into such a debate, but for the purposes of this exercise, here is a glance at how Kansas has performed year-by-year during its title streak, with the Jayhawks’ final Big 12 record, a look at the top of the standings, how Kansas performed against the top contender(s) and how many Big 12 teams went dancing.

When you put those factors together, 2010 is pretty remarkable, even if that pre-dated the round robin format now in place.

Immerse yourself in the data and decide for yourself: Which of the Jayhawks’ championship seasons stands out as the best?

— We'll add the final numbers for 2016 when the season wraps up this weekend.

2005 — KU 12-4 in 12-team league

As Oklahoma State's Joey Graham (14) found out, Kansas University's
Wayne Simien (23) could be a force inside. Against the Cowboys on
Feb. 27, Simien collected 32 points and 12 rebounds in KU's 81-79
victory.

As Oklahoma State's Joey Graham (14) found out, Kansas University's Wayne Simien (23) could be a force inside. Against the Cowboys on Feb. 27, Simien collected 32 points and 12 rebounds in KU's 81-79 victory. by Thad Allender/Journal-World File Photo

  • Co-champions with Oklahoma

  • Lost only regular-season meeting with OU, 71-63, in Norman, Okla.

  • Six NCAA Tournament teams in Big 12

2006 — KU 13-3 in 12-team league

(FILE) Kansas guard Brandon Rush reacts with excitement during the first half after a forced turnover on the Tigers.

(FILE) Kansas guard Brandon Rush reacts with excitement during the first half after a forced turnover on the Tigers. by Nick Krug

  • Co-champions with Texas

  • Lost only regular-season meeting with UT, 80-55, in Austin, Texas

  • Four NCAA Tournament teams in Big 12

2007 — KU 14-2 in 12-team league

(FILE) Kansas forward Julian Wright finishes a dunk with a smile during the second half of Saturday's game against the Tigers at Mizzou Arena.

(FILE) Kansas forward Julian Wright finishes a dunk with a smile during the second half of Saturday's game against the Tigers at Mizzou Arena. by Nick Krug

  • Finished 1 game ahead of runner-up Texas A&M

  • Lost only regular-season meeting with A&M, 69-66, at Allen Fieldhouse

  • Four NCAA Tournament teams in Big 12

2008 — KU 13-3 in 12-team league

(FILE) KU sophomore Mario Chalmers (15) shoots between CU's Jermyl Jackson-Wilson, left, and Richard Roby, right, Saturday, Feb. 2, 200 during the Jayhawks' 72-59 victory in Boulder. Chalmers had eight points in the game.

(FILE) KU sophomore Mario Chalmers (15) shoots between CU's Jermyl Jackson-Wilson, left, and Richard Roby, right, Saturday, Feb. 2, 200 during the Jayhawks' 72-59 victory in Boulder. Chalmers had eight points in the game. by John Henry

  • Co-champions with Texas

  • Lost only regular-season meeting with UT, 72-69, in Austin, Texas

  • Six NCAA Tournament teams in Big 12

2009 — KU 14-2 in 12-team league

(FILE) Kansas center Cole Aldrich delivers a thunderous dunk over Kansas State forward Jamar Samuels during the first half Tuesday, Jan. 13, 2009 at Allen Fieldhouse.

(FILE) Kansas center Cole Aldrich delivers a thunderous dunk over Kansas State forward Jamar Samuels during the first half Tuesday, Jan. 13, 2009 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

  • Finished 1 game ahead of runner-up Oklahoma

  • Won only regular-season meeting with OU, 87-78, in Norman, Okla.

  • Six NCAA Tournament teams in Big 12

2010 — KU 15-1 in 12-team league

Kansas guard Sherron Collins kisses the Big 12 championship trophy after the Jayhawks' win over Oklahoma, Monday, Feb. 22, 2010 at Allen Fieldhouse. In back is Kansas forward Marcus Morris.

Kansas guard Sherron Collins kisses the Big 12 championship trophy after the Jayhawks' win over Oklahoma, Monday, Feb. 22, 2010 at Allen Fieldhouse. In back is Kansas forward Marcus Morris. by Nick Krug

  • Finished 4 games ahead of second-place teams Kansas State, Baylor and Texas A&M

  • Swept K-State — 81-79 (OT) in Manhattan, 82-65 at Allen Fieldhouse

  • Won only regular-season meeting with BU, 81-75, at Allen Fieldhouse

  • Won only regular-season meting with A&M, 59-54, in College Station, Texas

  • Seven NCAA Tournament teams in Big 12

2011 — KU 14-2 in 12-team league

Marcus (22) and Markieff Morris (21) celebrate a blocked dunk by Marcus against Oklahoma State during the first half on Monday, Feb. 21, 2011 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Marcus (22) and Markieff Morris (21) celebrate a blocked dunk by Marcus against Oklahoma State during the first half on Monday, Feb. 21, 2011 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

  • Finished 1 game ahead of runner-up Texas

  • Lost only regular-season meeting with UT, 74-63, at Allen Fieldhouse

  • Five NCAA Tournament teams in Big 12

2012 — KU 16-2 in 10-team league

Kansas forward Thomas Robinson raises up the fieldhouse during overtime against Missouri on Saturday, Feb. 25, 2012 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas forward Thomas Robinson raises up the fieldhouse during overtime against Missouri on Saturday, Feb. 25, 2012 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

  • Finished 2 games ahead of runner-up Missouri

  • Split regular-season meetings with Mizzou — lost, 74-71, in Columbia, Mo.; won, 87-86 (OT), at Allen Fieldhouse

  • Six NCAA Tournament teams in Big 12

2013 — KU 14-4 in 10-team league

Kansas center Jeff Withey comes in for a jam against Oklahoma Jan. 26 at Allen Fieldhouse. This photo was taken using a remote camera with a wide-angle lens placed behind the glass of the backboard.

Kansas center Jeff Withey comes in for a jam against Oklahoma Jan. 26 at Allen Fieldhouse. This photo was taken using a remote camera with a wide-angle lens placed behind the glass of the backboard. by Nick Krug

  • Co-champions with Kansas State

  • Swept regular-season meetings with K-State — 59-55 in Manhattan, 83-62 at Allen Fieldhouse

  • Five NCAA Tournament teams in Big 12

2014 — KU 14-4 in 10-team league

Kansas guard Andrew Wiggins flashes a wide smile after getting a bucket with seconds left to life the Jayhawks over Texas Tech 64-63 on Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2014 at United Spirit Arena in Lubbock, Texas. At right is Kansas forward Perry Ellis.

Kansas guard Andrew Wiggins flashes a wide smile after getting a bucket with seconds left to life the Jayhawks over Texas Tech 64-63 on Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2014 at United Spirit Arena in Lubbock, Texas. At right is Kansas forward Perry Ellis. by Nick Krug

  • Finished 2 games ahead of runner-up Oklahoma

  • Swept regular-season meetings with OU — 90-83 in Norman, Okla., 83-75 at Allen Fieldhouse

  • Seven NCAA Tournament teams in Big 12

2015 — KU 13-5 in 10-team league

Kansas guard Frank Mason III (0), center, holds the 2015 Big 12 trophy after KU defeated the West Virginia Mountaineers 76-69 Tuesday, March 4, 2015 at Allen Fieldhouse..

Kansas guard Frank Mason III (0), center, holds the 2015 Big 12 trophy after KU defeated the West Virginia Mountaineers 76-69 Tuesday, March 4, 2015 at Allen Fieldhouse.. by Mike Yoder

  • Finished 1 game ahead of runners-up Iowa State and Oklahoma

  • Split regular-season meetings with ISU — lost, 86-81, in Ames, Iowa; won, 89-76, at Allen Fieldhouse

  • Split regular-season meetings with OU — won, 85-78, at Allen Fieldhouse; lost, 75-73, in Norman, Okla.

  • Seven NCAA Tournament teams in Big 12

2016 — KU 13-5 in 10-team league

  • Finished 2 games ahead of runner-up West Virginia

  • Split regular-season meetings with WVU — lost, 74-63, in Morgantown, W. Va.; won, 75-65, at Allen Fieldhouse

  • Likely seven NCAA Tournament teams

Reply 9 comments from Greg Lux Brian Mellor Humpy Helsel Dirk Medema Shannon Gustafson Michael Lorraine Phogdog Koolkeithfreeze Stupidmichael

Athletic Longhorns will rely on defense in rematch with KU

Texas head coach Shaka Smart directs his defense during the second half, Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Texas head coach Shaka Smart directs his defense during the second half, Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

Congratulations, Kansas. You just wrapped up at least a share of the Big 12 regular-season title (again). You’re about to be ranked No. 1 in the nation (again). Now get on down to Austin, Texas, on a two-day turnaround to face Shaka Smart’s Longhorns, who already have home victories over North Carolina, Iowa State, Vanderbilt, West Virginia and Oklahoma this season.

Such is life in the Big 12.

Texas (19-10 overall, 10-6) also comes into the Big Monday finale with little rest, but the ’Horns didn’t have any traveling to do after beating Oklahoma at Frank Erwin Center, eliminating their rivals from league title contention.

Smart’s teams get after it defensively, as the Longhorns showed at Allen Fieldhouse last month, when they blocked 8 shots and held KU to 40% shooting.

In Big 12 games, UT leads the league in fewest points allowed (68.2) and 3-point FG% defense (33%). So of course, Texas’ defense carried it against the Sooners on Saturday. The Longhorns went on a massive 22-0 run in the second half, holding OU to 0-for-9 shooting in that stretch — including 0-for-4 for Buddy Heild. Texas out-rebounded Oklahoma by 12 in the win and limited OU to 29% shooting in the second half.

That marquee victory could be topped against KU (25-4, 13-3) on Senior Night for such Longhorns as Javan Felix, Demarcus Holland, Prince Ibeh, Connor Lammert and Cameron Ridley (out, fractured left foot). If Smart can get another inspired defensive showing from his team and keep the Jayhawks constrained, Texas will have a shot at pulling off the first victory over a No. 1-ranked team in program history. The ’Horns already own a 3-0 mark at home against top-10 teams this season.

Kansas, meanwhile, has an outright Big 12 championship at stake. Win this game and West Virginia is out of the picture.

With all of those factors in mind, here are the Longhorns the Jayhawks will have to go through to extend their winning streak to 10 games.

TEXAS STARTERS

No. 1 — PG Isaiah Taylor | 6-3, jr.

Texas guard Isaiah Taylor (1) drives to the basket against Oklahoma guard Jordan Woodard (10) during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game, Saturday, Feb. 27, 2016, in Austin, Texas. Texas won 76-63. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

Texas guard Isaiah Taylor (1) drives to the basket against Oklahoma guard Jordan Woodard (10) during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game, Saturday, Feb. 27, 2016, in Austin, Texas. Texas won 76-63. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

— Jan. 23 at KU: 13 points, 6/11 FGs, 0/1 3s, 1/2 FTs, 6 rebounds, 5 assists, 1 turnover, 1 steal in 37 minutes

  • UT’s third-year starting point guard, junior Isaiah Taylor leads the team in scoring (15.5 points), assists (5.0), free-throw% (81%), steals (27) and minutes (30.8 mpg).

  • In league games, Taylor has 84 assists to 25 turnovers (3.4 ratio).

  • Put together a pretty impressive day vs. OU: 18 points, 5 assists and 0 turnovers.

  • For all his quickness and ball-handling ability, Taylor hasn’t been a guard who can stretch the floor for UT. He has just 14 successful 3-pointers on 54 tries this season (25.9%). In 16 conference games, Taylor is 8 of 33 (24.2%) from downtown.

No. 3 — G Javan Felix | 5-11, sr.

Texas guard Javan Felix (3) floats a shot over Kansas forward Landen Lucas (33) and guard Frank Mason III (0) during the second half, Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Texas guard Javan Felix (3) floats a shot over Kansas forward Landen Lucas (33) and guard Frank Mason III (0) during the second half, Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

— Jan. 23 at KU: 12 points, 5/12 FGs, 0/2 3s, 2/2 FTs, 1 rebound, 6 assists, 1 turnover, 2 steals in 30 minutes

  • Neck-and-neck with fellow senior Connor Lammert for title of UT’s best 3-point shooter this season, Javan Felix (11.1 points) has made 43 of 119 (36.1%) of his long-range jumpers…

  • … However, Felix has gone cold from deep in conference action, connecting on just 17 of his 65 3-point attempts (26.2%). He hasn’t made more than 1 3-pointer in a game in his past 6 outings (3-for-17, 17.6%).

  • In UT’s 11 games against top-25 competition this year, Felix has averaged 12.2 points and made 27 of 30 free throws.

  • Much like Taylor, Felix takes care of the basketball. With 65 assists and 32 turnovers on the season, he has a 2.0 assist-to-turnover ratio.

  • Scored 14 points against Oklahoma in UT’s big win, but had his worst ball-handling game of the season, with 5 turnovers and just 1 assist.

No. 44 — C Prince Ibeh | 6-11, sr.

TCU forward Devonta Abron (23) is blocked by Texas center Prince Ibeh (44) as he drives to the basket during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game, Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2016, in Austin, Texas. Texas won 71-54. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

TCU forward Devonta Abron (23) is blocked by Texas center Prince Ibeh (44) as he drives to the basket during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game, Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2016, in Austin, Texas. Texas won 71-54. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

— Jan. 23 at KU: 7 points, 3/4 FGs, 1/3 FTs, 7 rebounds (3 offensive) 3 turnovers, 7 blocks, 1 steal, 4 fouls in 35 minutes

  • An athletic big man capable of wreaking havoc on defense, senior Prince Ibeh (4.1 points) might be salivating at the thought of a KU rematch after he swatted away a career-high 7 shots at Allen Fieldhouse earlier this season. That was the most blocked shots for a KU opponent since Anthony Davis rejected 7 against the Jayhawks in Nov., 2011.

  • In UT’s last 10 games (7-3), Ibeh is averaging 7.1 points, 6.2 boards and 2.2 blocks in 21.4 minutes. In that span, Ibeh is shooting 62.8% from the floor.

  • Ibeh blocked 6 shots in just 16 minutes in UT’s home win over WVU earlier this month.

  • Making 67.9% of his shot attempts in Big 12 play, Ibeh at times is unstoppable in the paint. However, he can and should be fouled when he gets touches down low. Ibeh has made just 14 of 41 free throws (34.1%) against league foes.

  • Went and got 8 offensive rebounds (11 total) and scored 13 points in a victory over Vanderbilt.

No. 21 — F Connor Lammert | 6-10, sr.

None by Big 12 Conference

— Jan. 23 at KU: 15 points, 5/7 FGs, 5/7 3s, 4 rebounds, 1 turnover, fouled out in 30 minutes

  • Although Ibeh is more intimidating, senior big man Connor Lammert (6.9 points, team-leading 5.4 rebounds) actually brings more consistent offensive production.

  • Lammert scored 14 points, burned OU for 4-for-7 shooting from 3-point distance and swiped 2 steals on Saturday.

  • Like Ibeh, Lammert had a career game in UT’s first meeting with Kansas this season: 15 points and 5 3-pointers.

  • As mentioned earlier, Lammert has been one of UT’s best shooters this season, making 44 of 122 3-pointers (36.1%). But he also has maintained that in Big 12 play, unlike Felix. Lamert has hit a team-best 29 3’s against conference opponents on 76 attempts (38.2%).

No. 2 — G Demarcus Holland | 6-3, sr.

None by Big 12 Conference

— Jan. 23 at KU: 0 points, in 4 minutes off the bench

  • More of a team leader than stat producer, senior Demarcus Holland (2.6 points) has 88 career starts, tops on the roster.

  • Has started 3 times in Big 12 contests while logging just 9.9 minutes in 15 games, averaging 1.7 points and making only 32% of his shots.

  • Has gone scoreless in 3 straight games and 5 of the past 6.

  • Shooting 3-for-11 on 3-pointers in Big 12 games.

TEXAS BENCH

No. 10 — G Eric Davis Jr. | 6-2, fr.

None by Dallas Morning News

— Jan. 23 at KU: 13 points, 6/11 FGs, 1/2 3s, 5 rebounds (2 offensive), 1 steal in 21 minutes

  • Freshman Eric Davis (7.9 points) likes the spotlight. In 11 games vs. top-25 teams, the young guard averages 9.6 points and has hit 20 of 38 from beyond the 3-point arc (52.6%).

  • Starting to produce more consistently, Davis scored 10 points vs. Oklahoma, marking his fourth consecutive double-digit scoring game. During that run, he is averaging 11.5 points in 24.0 minutes, with 9 successful 3-pointers on 16 attempts (56.3%).

  • Hitting 35.8% of his 3-pointers in league games: 19 of 53.

No. 0 — G/F Tevin Mack | 6-6, fr.

None by Horns247

— Jan. 23 at KU: 0 points, 0/3 FGs, 0/3 3s, 1 turnover, 1 block in 10 minutes

  • Freshman backup Tevin Mack only plays 14.1 minutes but averages 5.5 points.

  • In his most impressive Big 12 outing to date, Mack hit 5 of his 12 3-pointers, scored 18 points and secured 5 rebounds in a loss at Iowa State.

  • That 3-point performance at ISU was a tad uncharacteristic. In the rest of his 15 league games combined, Mack has made 13 of 48 from long range (27%).

  • Has gone scoreless in back-to-back games, shooting 0-for-7 from the field in combined 21 minutes.

No. 5 — G Kendal Yancy | 6-3, jr.

None by Horns247

— Jan. 23 at KU: 0 points, 0/1 FGs, 0/1 3s, 3 rebounds, 1 assist in 12 minutes as a starter

  • Veteran backup Kendal Yancy (3.3 points) doesn’t take a lot of shots, but he has made 46.8% of his attempts in Big 12 games (22 of 47).

  • The same holds true for Yancy 3-pointers: 9 of 19 (47.4%) vs. the Big 12.

  • Scored a personal season-high 13 points and shot 3-for-4 on 3-pointers in a loss at OU.

No. 12 — G Kerwin Roach Jr. | 6-4, fr.

None by Inside Texas

— Jan. 23 at KU: 5 points, 1/5 FGs, 3/6 FTs, 2 rebounds in 19 minutes

  • Freakishly athletic, freshman Kerwin Roach (7.1 points) is the most likely Longhorn to put a defender in a highlight reel or Vine loop.

  • The more Roach plays the better he looks. In UT’s past 10 games, the first-year guard is averaging 9.9 points and 3.9 rebounds, and making 59.2% of his shots.

  • Had 12 points and 3 rebounds in win over OU.

  • Produced his first career double-double (15 points, 11 rebounds) to go with 2 assists and 4 steals as Texas beat Vanderbilt in the Big 12/SEC Challenge.

  • In 16 Big 12 games, has made 8 of his 21 tries from 3-point range.

  • Registered 2 or more steals 3 times in Big 12 play.

No. 32 — F Shaquille Cleare | 6-8, jr.

— Jan. 23 at KU: 2 points, 1/2 FGs in 3 minutes

  • When you see junior big man Shaquille Cleare (3.4 points) go to work, you’re not surprised to learn the massive post player’s favorite former Longhorn is Dexter Pittman.

  • A transfer from Maryland who sat out last season, Cleare put up a career-best 14 points in a loss to Baylor just over a week ago and pulled down 3 of his 5 rebounds on offense.

  • Making 56.9% of his shot attempts in Big 12 action, while averaging 4.3 points and 2.8 rebounds in 14.3 minutes.

Reply 2 comments from Chuckberry32 Dannyboy4hawks

Surging Red Raiders’ biggest challenge yet awaits them at KU

Texas Tech head coach Tubby Smith directs his defense during the second half, Saturday, Jan. 9, 2016 at United Spirit Arena in Lubbock, Texas.

Texas Tech head coach Tubby Smith directs his defense during the second half, Saturday, Jan. 9, 2016 at United Spirit Arena in Lubbock, Texas. by Nick Krug

Undeniably, Tubby Smith’s Texas Tech team is on the rise. The Red Raiders have won five straight games, a stretch that includes their first two road victories of the season.

As March approaches, Tech is peaking at the right time, playing its way from afterthought to NCAA Tournament team in the past couple of weeks.

But the Red Raiders (18-9 overall, 8-7 Big 12) will have to put together some extraordinary game planning and execution to add another win to the run Saturday at Allen Fieldhouse (11 a.m. tip, ESPN).

The No. 2-ranked Jayhawks (24-4, 12-3), of course, are on as good a run as any team in the nation, with eight straight victories, and in need of one more to snag at least a share of the program’s 12th conference crown in a row.

Smith, now in his 3rd season with the Red Raiders, is 0-5 versus KU as Tech’s head coach. While this team obviously is his best yet in Lubbock, Texas, it also is 0-2 on the road and 0-1 on neutral floors against RPI top-25 teams this season.

Texas Tech (No. 38 in the nation according to KenPom.com) will need to stick to what it does best to win at the fieldhouse, where Kansas has rattled off 38 consecutive victories.

The Red Raiders average 15.4 points off turnovers a game compared to their opponents’ average of 12.2.

In their best victories of the season, they’ve won points off turnovers:

- 10-7 (Jan. 2 vs Texas)

- 11-8 (Feb. 10 vs. Iowa State)

- 24-15 (Feb. 13 at Baylor)

- 14-9 (Feb. 17 vs. Oklahoma)

The ability to turn foes’ mistakes into easy points hasn’t always traveled well with Tech in its various stops around the Big 12 (and one SEC road game) this winter:

- at ISU, lost 14-10

- at Kansas State, lost 18-16

- at TCU, lost 15-8

- at OU, lost 16-13

- at Arkansas, lost 15-8

- at Texas, won 16-7 — but lost game 69-59

- at BU, won 24-15

- at Oklahoma State, lost 9-2

Clearly the Red Raiders will need to find some comfort in Allen Fieldhouse, and this is one way to do it. If possible, they’ll need to turn KU over and go the other way for baskets that will give them a boost while turning down the volume of the home crowd.

Another strategy the Red Raiders will use is simply attacking KU’s defense and getting to the free-throw line. Six of the Red Raiders’ top players have attempted 44 or more free throws in Big 12 play. When Tech makes 20 or more free throws this season, it has resulted in a Red Raiders victory on 10 out of 11 occasions.

Texas Tech’s 76.2% free-throw accuracy in conference games leads the Big 12.

Defensively, Tech’s biggest strength is its shot-blocking ability. The Red Raiders are averaging 4.5 swats a game in league play, second only to OU’s 5.9. So finding ways to frustrate KU around the rim will also be critical in their upset bid.

With those things in mind, here are the Red Raiders the Jayhawks have to worry about as they go after yet another Big 12 title.

TEXAS TECH STARTERS

No. 20 — G Toddrick Gotcher | 6-4, 205, sr.

Texas Tech's Toddrick Gotcher runs toward fans to celebrate after an NCAA college basketball game against Oklahoma on Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2016, in Lubbock, Texas. Texas Tech won 65-63. (AP Photo/Brad Tollefson)

Texas Tech's Toddrick Gotcher runs toward fans to celebrate after an NCAA college basketball game against Oklahoma on Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2016, in Lubbock, Texas. Texas Tech won 65-63. (AP Photo/Brad Tollefson)

  • — Jan. 9 vs. KU: 13 points, 5/12 FGs, 2/7 3s, 1/2 FTs, 2 rebounds, 2 assists, 1 steal in 32 minutes*

  • More likely than any other Red Raider to pull up from 3-point range, senior Toddrick Gotcher (10.9 points) has made a team-best 51 3-pointers on 129 attempts (39.5%).

  • In his last 6 games, Gotcher has knocked down 18 from downtown on 31 tries (58%).

  • A week ago, Gotcher scored a career-high 24 points at Oklahoma state, behind 4 second-half 3-pointers.

  • An 85% free-throw shooter in Big 12 games.

No. 11 — F Zach Smith | 6-8, 215, soph.

Kansas guard Frank Mason III tries to cut between Texas Tech forward Zach Smith (11) and guard Keenan Evans (12) for an attempted steal during the second half, Saturday, Jan. 9, 2016 at United Spirit Arena in Lubbock, Texas.

Kansas guard Frank Mason III tries to cut between Texas Tech forward Zach Smith (11) and guard Keenan Evans (12) for an attempted steal during the second half, Saturday, Jan. 9, 2016 at United Spirit Arena in Lubbock, Texas. by Nick Krug

  • — Jan. 9 vs. KU: 5 points, 2/7 FGs, 0/3 3s, 1/4 FTs, 6 rebounds (2 offensive), 1 block, 2 steals in 31 minutes*

  • Texas Tech’s best shot-blocker (1.6) and rebounder (7.5), sophomore Zach Smith chips in 10.3 points a game.

  • Had a rough outing at OSU last week, but bounced back by scoring a career-high 23 points on 8-for-13 shooting against TCU.

  • Playing well offensively in 4 of his last 5 games, Smith has averaged 13.2 points and shot 55% from the floor in Tech’s last 5 games.

  • Looking at the past 10 Tech games, Smith has blocked 23 shots.

  • Tech’s worst free-throw shooter among its core players, Smith is shooting 67.7% in Big 12 action.

No. 5 — F Justin Gray | 6-6, 210, soph.

None by TexasTech Basketball

  • — Jan. 9 vs. KU: 10 points, 4/7 FGs, 2/3 FTs, 3 rebounds (2 offensive), 1 turnover, 1 block, 2 steals in 23 minutes off the bench*

  • A second-year guard who became a starter late in the season, Justin Gray (8.7 points) leads Tech in 3-point accuracy: 17-for-40, 42.5%.

  • Only a starter for the past 7 games, Gray has produced double-digit points in 9 of the past 15 games.

  • However, Gray has been in an offensive slump the past 3 games: 5.3 ppg in 29.0 minutes/game.

  • In Big 12 contests, Gray averages 10.1 points on 52.5% shooting (best on the team) and is Tech’s second-best rebounder (4.6).

  • Hitting 73.8% of his free throws in conference.

No. 12 — G Keenan Evans | 6-3, 180, soph.

None by TexasTech Basketball

  • — Jan. 9 vs. KU: 1 point, 0/3 FGs, 1/3 FTs, 4 rebounds, 2 assists, 2 turnovers, 1 steal in 23 minutes*

  • Lead guard Keenan Evans (8.6 points) has only dished 2.8 assists a game this season — best on the team — but has become a little more active distributing the rock of late, with 3.3 apg in his past 6.

  • Had one of the best games of his career at Baylor, with career-high 21 points, to go with 5 assists and 4 steals.

  • An occasional 3-point shooter, Evans has hit 15 of 43 this season (34.9%). But he did connect on a big 3 to help beat Iowa State, giving TT the lead in overtime.

  • Leads Tech with 18 steals in Big 12 games.

  • Making 77.4% of his free throws in conference play.

No. 34 — F Matthew Temple | 6-10, 235, jr.

None by TexasTech Basketball

  • — Jan. 9 vs. KU: 3 points, 1/2 FGs, 1/1 3s, 2 rebounds in 9 minutes off the bench*

  • Not originally in Tech’s starting lineup, junior Matthew Temple (4.0 points in 12.0 minutes this season) still doesn’t spend much time on the court as one of the first 5.

  • One of the Red Raiders trying to fill the void left by center Norense Odiase, who broke a foot and could miss the remainder of the season, Temple joined the program as a walk-on before the season began.

  • Produced career-highs with 11 points an 4 rebounds in a blowout loss at OU last month.

  • He matched those 11 points last week while shooting 5-for-7 at OSU.

  • 3-for-4 from downtown in Big 12 games and 11-for-20 at the free-throw line (55%).

TEXAS TECH BENCH

No. 15 — F Aaron Ross | 6-8, 225, jr.

None by Campus Insiders

  • — Jan. 9 vs. KU: 7 points, 2/3 FGs, 1/2 3s, 2/2 FTs, 1 assist, 1 block, 4 fouls in 12 minutes*

  • In Big 12 play, junior sub Aaron Ross actually leads Tech in scoring. His 13.1 ppg average against conference opponents tops Gotcher’s 10.8 mark, despite Ross playing almost 5 fewer minutes per game.

  • Ross often sparks Tech, and he’ll need to do that at KU for his team to have a shot. He only played 12 minutes in the first matchup because, in part, he committed 4 fouls. Ross was the only Red Raider with a positive +/- vs. KU: +5.

  • When Ross comes off the bench, he produces by getting to the free-throw line (team-best 90.8% and 65 attempts in Big 12 play) and hitting from 3-point range (24 of 56, 42.9% in conference).

  • Coming off a career-high 25 points vs. TCU, when he went 12-for-12 at the free-throw line.

  • Has scored 10-plus points in 8 straight games, a career best. Ross’ last two single-digit outings? At Oklahoma (4 points) and vs. Kansas (7 points).

No. 0 — G Devaugntah Williams | 6-4, 205, sr.

None by Big 12 Conference

  • — Jan. 9 vs. KU: 4 points, 1/8 FGs, 0/3 3s, 2/4 FTs, 1 assist, 1 turnover in 25 minutes as a starter*

  • A former starter, senior Devaugntah Williams (10.8 points) has seen his team take off as he moved to the bench. Tech is 6-1 since Tubby Smith changed up his role.

  • Williams scored the game-winning layup with less than a second remaining to beat OSU in his first game as a backup.

  • Produced 19 points, 5 rebounds and 4 assists in Tech’s overtime upset of Iowa State.

  • A 37.9% 3-point shooter on the year, Williams’ accuracy has fallen off vs. league competition: 12 of 45, 26.7%.

  • In his past 4 games, Williams has only scored 4.3 points on 28.5% shooting, while making 2 of 6 from 3-point range.

  • Has shot 72.7% at the free-throw stripe against league foes.

Reply 1 comment from Maxhawk The_muser

These guys again: Bears seeking rare win over Jayhawks

Baylor head coach Scott Drew and the Bears' bench watch with moments remaining during the second half, Saturday, Jan. 2, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Baylor head coach Scott Drew and the Bears' bench watch with moments remaining during the second half, Saturday, Jan. 2, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

Baylor head coach Scott Drew arrived in the Big 12 the same season that Bill Self took over at Kansas. For all of Drew’s successes with the program since 2003, beating Self and the Jayhawks has proven one of the BU coach’s most difficult tasks.

Entering Tuesday night’s top-25 meeting at Waco’s Ferrell Center, Drew’s Bears have defeated a Self-coached KU team on three occasions, and only one of those came at home.

In his 13th season at Baylor, Drew, who shares with Self the distinction of longest tenured Big 12 coach, is 3-17 versus Kansas. Here are the Bears’ wins:

- 2009 Big 12 Tournament quarterfinals, in Oklahoma City

- 2012 Big 12 Tournament semifinals, in Kansas City, Mo.

- 2013 regular-season finale, in Waco

As seldom as Baylor has knocked off KU, Drew actually is one of just four active coaches with 3 wins against KU since 2008-09. The others? Michigan State’s Tom Izzo, Oklahoma State’s Travis Ford, and West Virginia’s Bob Huggins. Each of those coaches already has defeated Kansas this season.

The Jayhawks shellacked Baylor the first week of January, 102-74, in the Big 12 opener. But both teams have played 14 times since then, and you can’t expect a rematch in BU’s gymnasium to go that easily for No. 2-ranked Kansas (23-4 overall, 11-3 Big 12).

While No. 19 Baylor (20-7, 9-5) certainly doesn’t need to beat Kansas to get into the NCAA Tournament, a victory over the conference giant would clearly mean a lot to the Bears’ players and Drew. What’s more, BU — two games behind KU in the Big 12 standings — needs a win for a legitimate shot at the regular-season title.

Plus, beating KU would serve as a landmark victory for the program. Baylor is 0-15 all-time against teams ranked No. 1 or No. 2 in the AP Top 25.

As the Bears aim for a little payback and some history, here are some numbers to watch during KU-BU Part 2:

- Baylor is 20-0 this season when it has taken the lead at any point in the 2nd half of a game

- Baylor is 14-0 this season when winning the turnover battle, and 13-1 when getting more points off turnovers

- Baylor is 6-0 this season in games decided by 5 or fewer points or in overtime

- Baylor is 20-2 this season when shooting 40% or better from the field and 0-5 when shooting less than 40%

As for BU’s strengths? The Bears rank in the top 15 in the nation in:

- Assists per game (2nd, 19.1 apg; behind only Michigan State’s 20.7)

- Offensive rebound percentage (4th, 40.3%)

- Steal percentage (8th, 12%)

- Rebound margin (13th, +8.4 rpg)

- Assist-to-turnover ratio (15th, 1.52)

With all of those factors in mind, here are the Bears KU has to worry about in a critical late-February Big 12 matchup.

BAYLOR STARTERS

No. 21 — F Taurean Prince | 6-8, 220, sr.

Kansas State's Wesley Iwundu (25) defends as Baylor's Taurean Prince (21) drives to the basket in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game, Wednesday, Jan. 20, 2016, in Waco, Texas. Baylor won in double overtime, 79-72. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)

Kansas State's Wesley Iwundu (25) defends as Baylor's Taurean Prince (21) drives to the basket in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game, Wednesday, Jan. 20, 2016, in Waco, Texas. Baylor won in double overtime, 79-72. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)

  • — Jan. 2 at KU: 17 points, 2/6 FGs, 1/3 3s, 12/12 FTs, 3 rebounds (2 offensive), 1 assist, 1 turnover, 2 blocks, 2 steals in 22 minutes*

  • Baylor’s leading scorer, senior Taurean Prince (15.1 points) also gets rebounds (5.7) and steals (1.4) with the best of them. Prince ranks 5th in the Big 12 in scoring, 11th in boards and 10th in takeaways.

  • Prince’s active approach to everything he does also gets him to the free-throw line, where he shoots 83.3%, and helps make BU an elite offensive rebounding team. Prince gets 2.4 rebounds a game on offense. This year, he has 18 put-backs, per hoop-math.com.

  • A double-figure scorer in 10 straight games, Prince can be a streaky 3-point threat. On the year, he has shot 36.1% from deep. Looking at just his past 6 games, Prince has made 9 of 21 (42.3%). However, he didn’t make a single shot from downtown in 3 of those games.

No. 2 — C/F Rico Gathers | 6-8, 275, sr.

Baylor's Taurean Prince, left, and Rico Gathers (2) celebrate a basket by Gathers against Texas in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game, Monday, Feb. 1, 2016, in Waco, Texas. Gathers had 20 points and Prince had 18 in the 67-59 loss to Texas. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)

Baylor's Taurean Prince, left, and Rico Gathers (2) celebrate a basket by Gathers against Texas in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game, Monday, Feb. 1, 2016, in Waco, Texas. Gathers had 20 points and Prince had 18 in the 67-59 loss to Texas. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)

  • — Jan. 2 at KU: 12 points, 5/8 FGs, 2/4 FTs, 9 rebounds, 1 turnover, 1 block in 29 minutes*

  • One of the strongest post players in the nation, senior Rico Gathers (12.2 points) ranks 3rd in Big 12 history in career rebounds, with 1,096. Only KU legend Nick Collison (1,143) and Texas’ Damion James (1,318) have more.

  • Gathers is the best offensive rebounder in the nation, securing 19.6% of his team’s misses. The powerful forward has used that skill to produce 53 put-backs this season.

  • With a team-best 8 double-doubles, Gathers averages 10.0 boards a game this year. But the senior hasn’t topped 9 rebounds in his past 6 games and missed 2 of the past 4 games with the flu. Gathers only played 15 minutes at Texas this past weekend, grabbing 4 boards.

  • In Big 12 play, Gathers is shooting 50% from the floor, but just 58.6% from the free-throw line — and he leads the Bears in free-throw attempts.

No. 25 — G Al Freeman | 6-3, 200, soph.

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) pulls up for a three against Baylor guard Al Freeman (25) during the first half, Saturday, Jan. 2, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse. At left is Kansas forward Cheick Diallo (13).

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) pulls up for a three against Baylor guard Al Freeman (25) during the first half, Saturday, Jan. 2, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse. At left is Kansas forward Cheick Diallo (13). by Nick Krug

  • — Jan. 2 at KU: 6 points, 2/10 FGs, 0/3 3s, 2/2 FTs, 4 rebounds, 1 assist, 2 turnovers in 32 minutes*

  • The Bears’ top 3-point shooter, sophomore Al Freeman (11.6 points) has nailed 40% from downtown this season, with a team-leading 42 makes.

  • When Freeman gets hot offensively, it generally means good things for Baylor. The Bears are 21-2 in his career double-figure scoring outings.

  • In BU’s last 6 games, Freeman actually has failed to reach double figures in points on 4 occasions. In that stretch, Freeman has made 20 of his 42 field-goal attempts (47.6%). So he’s just seen a drop in usage in his off games more than anything.

  • Freeman’s drop in production in the past 6 games coincides with teams limiting his 3-point shooting. He shot 3-for-3 from deep and scored 21 points at Kansas State. In 5 other February games combined, Freeman has made 1 3-pointer on 10 tries.

  • All of Baylor’s starters get to the foul line, and in Big 12 play, Freeman has been the second-best shooter, making 43 of 50 (86%), just 0.003 behind Prince.

No. 11 — PG Lester Medford | 5-10, 175, sr.

Kansas guard Frank Mason III (0) defends against a pass from Baylor guard Lester Medford (11) during the second half, Saturday, Jan. 2, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse. In back is Baylor forward Taurean Prince (21).

Kansas guard Frank Mason III (0) defends against a pass from Baylor guard Lester Medford (11) during the second half, Saturday, Jan. 2, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse. In back is Baylor forward Taurean Prince (21). by Nick Krug

  • — Jan. 2 at KU: 15 points, 5/12 FGs, 1/1 3s, 4/5 FTs, 4 rebounds, 3 assists, 2 turnovers, 1 steal in 34 minutes*

  • Baylor’s play-maker, senior Lester Medford (9.7 points) dishes out 6.9 assists a game.

  • Medford is the only player in the country who ranks in the top 45 in assists (8th), assist-to-turnover ratio (3.3, 20th) and steals (1.9, 42nd). No one in the Big 12 has more defensive thefts than Medford.

  • The veteran guard hit game-winning shots for BU twice this season: a 3-pointer against Vanderbilt and another 3 at Texas Tech.

  • In Big 12 play, Medford has been BU’s best 3-point shooter. A 38.5% 3-point maker on the year, he’s shooting 45.8% in league games, with 22 makes on 48 attempts.

  • Medford’s 2-point shots in conference action haven’t been nearly as productive: 23 of 65 (35.4%).

No. 24 — G/F Ishmail Wainright | 6-5, 230, jr.

Kansas State's D.J. Johnson (4) and Baylor's Ishmail Wainright battle for a rebound during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Feb. 10, 2016, in Manhattan, Kan. Baylor won 82-72. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

Kansas State's D.J. Johnson (4) and Baylor's Ishmail Wainright battle for a rebound during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Feb. 10, 2016, in Manhattan, Kan. Baylor won 82-72. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

  • — Jan. 2 at KU: 7 points, 3/7 FGs, 1/2 3s, 7 rebounds (3 offensive), 1 assist, 3 turnovers, 1 block, 4 fouls in 22 minutes*

  • A key cog in everything Baylor does, junior Ishmail Wainright (5.6 points) is starting to knock down 3-pointers when he gets good looks from behind the arc. In his last 5 games, Wainright has nailed 8 of 12 from 3-point land. That’s more 3’s than he hit in his first 2 seasons combined (5).

  • On the year, Wainright has made 21 of 51 3-pointers (41.2%) and is shooting 42.2% from the floor overall, while adding 4.0 rebounds and 2.8 assists.

  • If Wainright seems like a totally different player than he did a year ago in a reserve role, it’s because he shed 30 pounds in the offseason.

  • This past weekend, Wainright led BU with 5 assists, 5 rebounds and 2 blocks, while adding 4 points in the Bears’ 14-point road win at Texas.

BAYLOR BENCH

No. 5 — F Johnathan Motley | 6-9, 230, soph.

Kansas forward Cheick Diallo (13) puts up a shot over Baylor forward Johnathan Motley (5) during the first half, Saturday, Jan. 2, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas forward Cheick Diallo (13) puts up a shot over Baylor forward Johnathan Motley (5) during the first half, Saturday, Jan. 2, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

  • — Jan. 2 at KU: 8 points, 2/8 FGs, 4/6 FTs, 6 rebounds (2 offensive), 1 assist, 0 turnovers, 2 blocks, fouled out in 21 minutes off the bench*

  • The primary offensive contributor off Baylor’s bench, sophomore Johnathan Motley (11.5 points, 2nd in Big 12 among backups) has put up double figures 14 times this season, and BU has an 11-3 record when he hits or surpasses the 10-point mark.

  • While the Bears got blown out at the fieldhouse to open league play, Motley had the best +/- of BU players to register double-digit minutes: -7. His length and athleticism can give Kansas issues inside, around the rim, if he can stay on the floor and avoid foul trouble.

  • No one in the Big 12 is as effective a scorer as Motley, whose 67% success rate on field-goal attempts leads the league.

  • Not only does Motley convert 75.9% of his shots at the rim, he shoots 53.9% on 2-point jumpers (any shot inside the arc not considered a layup or dunk) — 55 of 102.

  • Motley has actually started the past 2 BU games and 3 of the last 4, in place of Gathers (illness).

  • The second-year forward ranks 2nd in the Big 12 in blocks (1.2) and 10th in offensive rebounding (2.2), while playing 20.2 minutes a game. Motley has 26 put-backs on the season.

  • In Big 12 games, Motley is BU’s 2nd-best scorer, with a 12.2 ppg average. He has only attempted 1 shot from 3-point range in league games and he missed it.

No. 31 — F Terry Maston | 6-7, 215, soph.

None by Baylor Basketball

  • — Jan. 2 at KU: 7 points, 3/4 FGs, 1/2 FTs, 1 (offensive) rebound, 1 turnover in 8 minutes off the bench*

  • Another substitute scoring threat, sophomore Terry Maston (6.6 points, 13.3 minutes) shoots 57.3% from the floor. Maston doesn’t qualify for Big 12 rankings (minimum of 4.0 FG made/game), but he place rank third in the league in FG% if he did.

  • In Big 12 play alone, Maston averages 7.5 points on 58.4% shooting.

  • Just like Motley, Maston knows the best shots for him, and makes 67.5% at the rim and 52% on 2-point jumpers.

  • Maston also gets to the foul line for easy points, shooting 83.3% on his 2.0 attempts per game — remember, he doesn’t get many minutes.

  • Some games, Drew just doesn’t use Maston that much (see: 3 minutes at Texas, and 4 minutes vs. Texas Tech in 2 of the past 3 games). But the explosive sub put up 15 points in 17 minutes vs. Iowa State.

No. 3 — PG Jake Lindsey | 6-5, 190, fr.

None by Big 12 Conference

  • — Jan. 2 at KU: 2 points, 1/2 FGs, 1 assist, 0 turnovers, 1 steal in 20 minutes off the bench*

  • Drew doesn’t ask too much from his freshman backup point, Jake Lindsey (2.5 points in 13.4 minutes), because of how much BU relies upon Medford.

  • The youngster takes great care of the ball, though, with 62 assists and just 19 turnovers on the season. Lindsey’s 3.3 assist-to-turnover ratio is 4th in the Big 12.

  • Lindsey has proven he can defend larger players, too, drawing Iowa State’s Georges Niang within BU’s triangle-and-2 zone late in a Jan. 9 road win.

  • Lindsey has yet to incorporate the 3-point shot as a weapon (2 of 13, 15.4% on the season; and 0-for-1 in the Big 12).

No. 22 — G King McClure | 6-3, 200, fr.

None by Baylor Basketball

  • — Jan. 2 at KU: 0 points, 0/1 FGs, 0/1 3s, 1 turnover in 9 minutes off the bench*

  • Another young Bear off the bench, freshman King McClure (4.4 points) has grown more comfortable as the season progresses.

  • In the last 12 games, McClure averages 5.8 points, and has made 12 of his 29 3-point bombs (41.4%).

  • McClure is hitting 46.2% of his shots overall this season, while making 37.7% of his 3-pointers.

  • He hasn’t made a 3-pointer in BU’s past 3 games (0-for-5).

Reply 4 comments from Dannyboy4hawks Goku Dirk Medema

These guys again: K-State will have to rely on defense, rebounding to upset KU

Kansas State head coach Bruce Weber is pulled back by Kansas State forward Wesley Iwundu (25) while disputing an out-of-bounds ball during the first half on Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas State head coach Bruce Weber is pulled back by Kansas State forward Wesley Iwundu (25) while disputing an out-of-bounds ball during the first half on Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

In theory, the Big 12’s first-place team should be able to go into the arena of the league’s eighth-place team and win with relative ease. But you know what they say about rivalry games, and Kansas enters Saturday’s Sunflower Showdown at Kansas State looking for its first win against Bruce Weber’s Wildcats in Bramlage Coliseum since Perry Ellis’ freshman year.

(Insert your When was that? 1992?-type joke here.)

At 15-11 overall and 4-9 in the Big 12, the Wildcats aren’t particularly impressive. Still, just two weeks ago they shocked Oklahoma in Manhattan, 80-69.

Ranked No. 44 in the nation by kenpom.com, college hoops’ math wizard actually really likes K-State’s defense, which ranks ninth in the country in adjusted defensive efficiency.

The No. 2-ranked Jayhawks (22-4, 10-3) know the Wildcats compete on defense and on the glass. K-State made KU look awful on the boards in Allen Fieldhouse, as Kansas got out-rebounded 36-21 in an 18-point home win.

Kansas State had similar success while knocking off Oklahoma. The Sooners lost the battle of the boards, 36-29. But the Wildcats really won that game by taking away OU’s 3-pointers. The Sooners only made 6 of 24 from deep at Bramlage and shot a miserable 11.1% in the second half.

If K-State can control the glass again versus Kansas and duplicate the 3-point defense it played against Oklahoma, that’s a great recipe for an upset with the Wildcats’ rabid fan base providing moral support.

Obviously, Weber’s team isn’t unbeatable at home. K-State’s three Bramlage losses all came against ranked teams: West Virginia, 87-83 (2OT), Iowa State, 76-63, and Baylor, 82-72.

We’ll find out Saturday if Kansas can join that bunch or if K-State will win 3 consecutive home games against KU for the first time since 1981-83.

Now it’s time to get reacquainted with the Wildcats Bill Self’s Jayhawks will have to keep in check to maintain sole possession of first place in the Big 12.

KANSAS STATE STARTERS

No. 25 — G/F Wesley Iwundu | 6-7, 210, jr.

Kansas forward Carlton Bragg Jr. and Kansas guard Brannen Greene, right, try to smother a pass from Kansas State forward Wesley Iwundu (25) during the first half on Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas forward Carlton Bragg Jr. and Kansas guard Brannen Greene, right, try to smother a pass from Kansas State forward Wesley Iwundu (25) during the first half on Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

— Feb. 3 at KU: 15 points, 5/7 FGs, 1/2 3s, 4/4 FTs, 5 rebounds, 5 assists, 6 turnovers, 1 steal in 37 minutes

  • K-State’s most versatile player, junior Wesley Iwundu averages 12.1 points, 4.7 rebounds and 3.6 assists.

  • Iwundu has led the Wildcats in scoring 7 times, in assists 13 times and in rebounding 5 times this season.

  • Against Oklahoma, Iwundu poured in 22 points, a personal career best in a Big 12 game. He also led K-State with 7 rebounds and 3 steals in the upset.

  • Iwundu has only hit 6 of his 26 attempts from 3-point range (23.1%) this season. He’s improved a little in Big 12 play: 4 of 13 (30.8%).

  • Leads K-State in free-throw attempts but is shooting 68.5% (85 of 124).

No. 14 — G Justin Edwards | 6-4, 200, sr.

Kansas forward Carlton Bragg Jr. (15) gets a hand on a shot from Kansas State guard Justin Edwards (14) during the first half on Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas forward Carlton Bragg Jr. (15) gets a hand on a shot from Kansas State guard Justin Edwards (14) during the first half on Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

— Feb. 3 at KU: 2 points, 1/9 FGs, 0/3 3s, 6 rebounds (2 offensive), 1 assists, 3 turnovers, 1 steal in 31 minutes

  • The only senior in K-State’s starting lineup, Justin Edwards barely trails Iwundu for the team lead in scoring (12.0 points) and adds 5.7 rebounds and 2.8 assists, as well.

  • Edwards scored a game-high 17 points at TCU this week in a rare road win for the inconsistent Wildcats.

  • In Big 12 games, Edwards leads the team in points (11.3), rebounding, (5.6) and steals (2.1).

  • Ten times in Big 12 play, Edwards has swiped 2 or more steals.

  • On the year, Edwards has made 25 of 87 from 3-point range (28.7%).

  • He’s an active guard on the offensive glass, averaging 2.3 a game, with a team-leading 61 offensive rebounds on the season.

No. 32 — F Dean Wade | 6-10, 225, fr.

None by K-State Athletics

— Feb. 3 at KU: 5 points, 2/3 FGs, 1/2 FTs, 2 rebounds, 4 fouls in 26 minutes

  • Freshman big man Dean Wade comes in averaging 10.0 points and 5.3 rebounds, and likely motivated to prove he can hang with the Jayhawks after a poor showing in his first collegiate game against Kansas.

  • Wade stepped up against Oklahoma, scoring a career-best 17 points, even though Weber didn’t start him that game.

  • The big man’s activity on defense at TCU helped him come away with 4 steals.

  • Maybe one day the young post player’s long-range shooting will come around. For now, Wade is hitting just 28.8% of his 3-pointers (19 of 66). He’s actually dipped even lower in Big 12 games: 9 of 37 (24.3%).

  • On 2-point attempts in conference games, Wade is converting 50.7% of the time.

  • His 10 blocked shots in Big 12 games ranks 2nd on K-State.

No. 5 — G Barry Brown | 6-3, 195, fr.

None by K-State Basketball

— Feb. 3 at KU: 11 points, 4/10 FGs, 3/7 3s, 0/1 FTs, 2 rebounds, 2 assists, 3 turnovers, 2 steals in 28 minutes off the bench

  • A freshman guard who is gaining steam of late, Barry Brown averages 9.0 points on the season, and recently got promoted to the starting lineup.

  • Brown started the first game of his career in K-State’s upset win over OU.

  • In the past week, Brown averaged 13 points in road games at Oklahoma State and TCU. He nailed 6 of 11 3-pointers in those games, as K-State went 1-1.

  • Before moving to the starting 5, Brown led K-State in scoring from the bench in 5 games.

  • In Big 12 games, Brown averages 11.2 points.

  • Now that Kamau Stokes is out with an injury, Brown has caught up with Stokes for the team lead in 3-pointers. Brown is shooting 34.7% from beyond the arc: 35 of 101.

No. 4 — F D.J. Johnson | 6-9, 250, jr.

Kansas State's D.J. Johnson (4) and Baylor's Ishmail Wainright battle for a rebound during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Feb. 10, 2016, in Manhattan, Kan. Baylor won 82-72. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

Kansas State's D.J. Johnson (4) and Baylor's Ishmail Wainright battle for a rebound during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Feb. 10, 2016, in Manhattan, Kan. Baylor won 82-72. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

— Feb. 3 at KU: 9 points, 3/4 FGs, 3/4 FTs, 4 rebounds (2 offensive), 2 turnovers, 1 steal, 5 fouls in 12 minutes

  • K-State’s bruiser in the paint, junior D.J. Johnson averages 8 points and 5 boards, while leading the team in field-goal%, at 63.3%.

  • Johnson’s numbers have come in less than 20 minutes a game, as he eased back into playing after sitting out the previous season with a broken foot.

  • A starter in K-State’s last 4 games, Johnson has averaged 11.5 points and 6.5 rebounds while hitting 62% of his shots since the change.

  • Put up a career-high 19 points and led K-State with 8 rebounds against Baylor, in a 10-point home loss.

  • When K-State knocked off Oklahoma, Johnson contributed 12 points off 5-for-6 shooting and grabbed 8 rebounds.

  • Johnson has a team-best 13 blocks in Big 12 games.

  • With 60 offensive boards on the season, Johnson is averaging 2.4 a game in just 19.6 minutes a game.

KANSAS STATE BENCH

No. 41 — F Stephen Hurt | 6-11, 265, sr.

Kansas forward Landen Lucas (33) battles for position with Kansas State forward Stephen Hurt (41) during the first half on Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas forward Landen Lucas (33) battles for position with Kansas State forward Stephen Hurt (41) during the first half on Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

— Feb. 3 at KU: 14 points, 6/13 FGs, 0/4 3s, 2/4 FTs, 11 rebounds (4 offensive), 4 turnovers, 1 block, 1 steal in 28 minutes as a starter

  • A former starter, senior big man Stephen Hurt averages 6.6 points and 4.5 rebounds on the season. However, he more than doubled both of those numbers against Kansas earlier this month.

  • Hurt enjoys taking jumpers but has made just 11 of 41 from behind the 3-point line (26.8%).

  • While his minutes are down in K-State’s past 3 games (11.7 a game), Weber figures to use him more against Kansas, given his success in the first meeting.

No. 1 — G Carlbe Ervin II | 6-3, 205, jr.

None by K-State Athletics

— Feb. 3 at KU: 0 points, 0/6 FGs, 0/1 3s, 3 rebounds (2 offensive), 3 assists, 2 turnovers, 1 steal, 4 fouls in 21 minutes as a starter

  • A substitute role player, junior Carlbe Ervin II averages 2.9 points and 2.0 rebounds, and actually has started 5 games this season.

  • In 2 of his last 3 games, Ervin has grabbed 3 offensive rebounds. He’s averaging 4.7 boards in his last 3 games.

  • Beginning with K-State’s trip to KU, Ervin has struggled from the field. In his last 5 games, he has only made 2 of 15 shot attempts (13.3%).

  • Ervin has made just 3 of 22 from 3-point range this year (13.6%).

No. 35 — F Austin Budke | 6-6, 220, jr.

None by Big 12 Conference

— Feb. 3 at KU: 3 points, 1/1 FGs, 1/1 3s, 1 (offensive) rebound, 1 assist, 1 turnover in 13 minutes off the bench

  • Another role player, junior Austin Budke averages just 2.8 points and 2.2 rebounds.

  • The walk-on has played in every game, averaging just 13.8 minutes.

  • Budke has hit 50% of his shots in Big 12 games, but only 1 of 3 from deep (he made his lone 3 vs. KU).

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