Proposed sub rule may slow pace of college football offenses

Kansas coach Charlie Weis works on an official to make his point that a TCU player that was out of bounds during Saturday's game in Fort Worth, Texas.

Kansas coach Charlie Weis works on an official to make his point that a TCU player that was out of bounds during Saturday's game in Fort Worth, Texas.

Friday, February 14, 2014

A proposed rule change for the 2014 college football season could impact the way Kansas University and others defend the fast-paced offenses that have created havoc during recent seasons.

According to a report on the NCAA’s official website, a five-yard delay-of-game penalty would be enforced any time an offense snaps the ball during the first 10 seconds of the 40-second play clock. If approved, the rule would not apply in the final two minutes of each half. The idea is to allow defenses to substitute without offenses being able to hold them hostage with fast tempo and quick snaps.

Under the current rules, defensive players are not guaranteed an opportunity to substitute unless the offense substitutes first.

The report by the NCAA Football Rules Committee cites “student-athlete safety” as the reason for the change and states that “the committee believes that 10 seconds provides sufficient time for defensive player substitutions without inhibiting the ability of an offense to play at a fast pace. Research indicated that teams with fast-paced, no-huddle offenses rarely snap the ball with 30 seconds or more on the play clock.”

All rules proposals must be approved by the NCAA Playing Rules Oversight Panel, which will discuss football rules changes March 6.

No more Mike IDs

KU sophomore T.J. Millweard revealed Wednesday that a staple of KU coach Charlie Weis’ offense known as the Mike ID is no longer a part of KU’s offense.

“We do not have that in our offense anymore,” Millweard said of identifying the middle linebacker before each snap. “It’s something we changed, and I think it’ll help us, as quarterbacks, get to look at the defense a little more, and it’ll help the O-line communicate.”

During Weis’ first two seasons at KU, many quarterbacks said learning the Mike ID calls was one of the most difficult parts of the offense.

Mitchell praised

Rivals.com named KU running-backs coach and recruiting coordinator Reggie Mitchell as one of the 10 best recruiters in the Big 12.

Only seven of the conference’s 10 schools landed coaches on the list — K-State, Iowa State and TCU were left off — and Mitchell was lauded for his work in landing four-star running back Traevohn Wrench, East St. Louis, Ill., linebacker Kyron Watson and Texas talents Corey Avery, Lay’Trion Jones and Derrick Neal.