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Class of 2019 PG Tre Mann sets visits with Kansas

Kansas University basketball recruiting

Kansas University basketball recruiting

The original announcement was supposed to come three weeks ago, but then Tre Mann reopened his recruitment.

Now, the four-star point guard from The Villages, Fla., is in the process of setting up official visits and Kansas remains on his list.

Mann, a 6-foot-4, 170-pound point guard who had previously narrowed his choices down to a final three of Kansas, Florida and Tennessee, has put North Carolina into the mix and has set up official visits with the Tar Heels and Jayhawks for next month, according to a report from Rivals.com’s Corey Evans.

Florida and Tennessee remain in the hunt as part of what Evans deems “a four-team race between KU, UNC, Florida and Tennessee.”

With past official visits to Tennessee (April 24) and Florida (May 1) already in the bag — plus several unofficial visits to UF — Mann now has set up official visits with North Carolina (Sept. 14) and Kansas (Sept. 21).

Mann also plans to host an in-home visit with Tennessee on Sept. 9, the first allowable in-home visit day by NCAA rules, and will host coaches from Kansas on Sept. 10.

Evans said the point guard who is ranked No. 30 in the nation in the 2019 class could still schedule official visits with Florida, Tennessee and possibly one other program.

According to Evans, there is no new timetable for Mann’s decision, but it’s clear the Jayhawks have their work cut out for them with this one.

“The Tar Heels do not have a pure lead guard on (their) roster and Mann would be the perfect solution,” wrote Evans last week in a feature that pointed out that Carolina has been dubbed Mann’s dream school during the past couple of years. “I still think that Florida is the team to beat, but Mann might be the most important for UNC’s long-term future and success rate over the next few years.”

The senior who has continued to rise in the Class of 2019 rankings — he jumped seven spots from his previous ranking at the start of the summer — enjoyed a solid AAU season during the past couple of months.

In 21 games on the Nike EYBL circuit, the lightning-quick point guard averaged 17.3 points, 4.6 rebounds, 2.5 assists and 1.9 steals per game while also shooting 38 percent from 3-point range.

None by Tre Mann

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Kansas the pick, according to CBS’ ‘Candid Coaches’ series

Blue Team forward Dedric Lawson (1) puts up a three over Red Team forward Silvio De Sousa (22) during a scrimmage on Tuesday, June 5, 2018, at the Horejsi Athletic Center.

Blue Team forward Dedric Lawson (1) puts up a three over Red Team forward Silvio De Sousa (22) during a scrimmage on Tuesday, June 5, 2018, at the Horejsi Athletic Center. by Nick Krug

What do Kansas, Duke and Kentucky all have in common?

In addition to being three of the biggest powerhouse recruiting programs in college basketball, being in the top four in all-time victories and having been led by Hall of Fame coaches, those three also were the most popular answers to the CBS Sports poll question, “Who will be the best team in college basketball in the 2018-19 season?”

Big surprise, right?

After all, KU, Kentucky and Duke have long been at the top of the college basketball world, operating as annual title contenders and tossing some of the best talent in the college game onto the court year after year after year after year.

While that trio accounted for nearly two-thirds of the answers in CBS’ annual “Candid Coaches” feature, in which CBS writers Gary Parrish and Matt Norlander ask more than 100 college coaches for their answers to some of the most intriguing questions surrounding the game today each offseason.

The series, which this year opened with a question about which college coach was doing the best job of playing by the rules — Michigan’s John Belein was the run-away winner there — offers some great insight into some fun questions that might not be answered without the anonymity that it offers.

OK. Back to the best team in basketball question. While the blue-blood trio received more than 70 percent of the votes, it was Kansas that received more than half of that.

The Jayhawks were the answer on 38 percent of ballots, coming in 20 percentage points ahead of Kentucky (18 percent) and finishing 23 percent higher than Duke (15).

So, why Kansas?

That was answered, too.

"They've got enough coming back,” one coach told CBS. “Have had some guys sitting. Add that to what they've added in terms of their recruiting class, and they've got all the makings of a national championship team. When Bill Self likes his team, you're in trouble. I think he likes this team. Deep, big and can overwhelm you at a lot of positions.”

“Kansas is talented, deep and old,” another coach said. “They have to be the favorite to win it all. Dedric Lawson is going to dominate that league.”

And, finally, “They have the best mixture of talent and experience. Plus, they have the transfers that have proven they can play and score at a high level.”

It all makes sense. And it’s nothing you haven’t heard or read here and a dozen other places before. But there’s something different — something more powerful — about hearing it from the mouths of actual college coaches.

Clearly, the Jayhawks are positioned for a big season. And when you combine their talent, depth and experience with the fact that the Big 12 appears to be at least a little bit down this year, there’s no reason to think that any of these coaches are wrong.

Check out the complete article for the rest of the list — a couple of programs might surprise you — including Parrish’s thoughts on whether the coaches polled were right or wrong in picking KU.

Reply 22 comments from Ronfranklin The_muser Sam Allen Ryan Zimmerman Chancevandal Forever2008 Dirk Medema Shannon Gustafson Cshjhawk Dillon Davis and 3 others

Jayhawks back on campus, ready to dive into preseason hoops work

Blue Team center David McCormack comes in for a dunk during a scrimmage on Wednesday, June 13, 2018, at the Horejsi Family Athletics Center.

Blue Team center David McCormack comes in for a dunk during a scrimmage on Wednesday, June 13, 2018, at the Horejsi Family Athletics Center. by Nick Krug

The gang’s all here and the Kansas men’s basketball team is officially ready to begin preparations for the 2018-19 season, which officially opens in just 39 days.

That date — Sept. 28 — marks the arrival of Late Night in the Phog, KU’s first official practice of the season, with KU’s first exhibition game of the 2018-19 season (Oct. 25 vs. Emporia State) coming less than a month after that.

“Everybody’s back,” KU coach Bill Self told the Journal-World late Sunday night.

While a few KU players were around Lawrence already, the majority of the team returned to campus over the weekend to meet with the coaches and prepare for Monday’s first day of classes for the fall semester.

In the weeks leading up to the final Friday in September, the Jayhawks will run through the standard preseason work and, of course, Bill Self’s famed boot camp to ensure they’re ready for the start of the season.

“Individual and pick-up (games) this week,” Self said. “We’ll get more serious next week.”

While the fact that all 15 Jayhawks — 12 scholarship players and three walk-ons — reported to campus on time certainly comes as no surprise, there have been years when family commitments or travel issues have kept one or two players from arriving on time. The fact that they’re all here and raring to go represents good news for what will be an almost completely new team from the 2017-18 squad that ended the season at the Final Four.

Four freshmen — all with a chance at earning important minutes — and three transfers who are finally eligible again will make up a good chunk of KU’s rotation. Add to that a couple of veterans in Udoka Azubuike, Mitch Lightfoot and Lagerald Vick and sophomores Marcus Garrett and Silvio De Sousa, and it’s easy to see that the next few weeks could be as important as any all season for a team still trying to find out how to play together and learn the strengths and weaknesses of each player on the roster.

It’s a far cry from the days of the past few seasons when names like Perry Ellis, Frank Mason III, Devonte’ Graham and Svi Mykhailiuk returned year after year, bringing with them an element of certainty both for the rest of the roster and Self and his staff.

With that in mind, here’s a quick look at what each player should emphasize during the remainder of the preseason:

• Ochai Agbaji – All signs point to the freshman from KCMO being ready to contribute right away. Now is not the time for Agbaji to get timid.

• Udoka Azubuike – The summer was a nice opportunity for Azubuike to ease into more of a leadership role, but now is when it gets real. The work he does in the next few weeks as a leader can set the tone for how easily this team will follow the big fella when things get going for real.

• Silvio De Sousa – An already-skilled, tremendously gifted offensive player, De Sousa’s major focus during the preseason should be on rebounding.

• Devon Dotson – The starting point guard role is there for the taking and Dotson has all the tools needed to win it. The biggest area he needs to improve is in using his voice to be the kind of assertive and confident point guard KU is used to having.

• Marcus Garrett – Everyone will talk about the jump shot, but Garrett already has put the time to fix that. His most important job during the next five or six weeks will be to show all of these young guys and newcomers how doing the little things can put you in the good graces of the coaching staff in a hurry.

• Quentin Grimes – The hopes and expectations are high for Grimes and it’s never too early to start asserting yourself as the guy teammates want with the ball in his hands when the game is on the line.

• Dedric Lawson – A happy, laid-back dude by nature, it’s time for Lawson to flip the switch and get locked in on going after all of those goals he has for the upcoming season — Big 12 player of the year, Big 12 title No. 15 in a row, Final Four, national title, etc. Lawson, perhaps as much as any player on this roster, will play a huge part in delivering all of those, should they come.

• K.J. Lawson – K.J.’s going to play, and it’s up to him how much and where. The best thing he can do right now is really lock in on one aspect of his game — my pick for him would be becoming a lock-down defender — and show the coaching staff that that’s where and how they should use you this season.

• Mitch Lightfoot – The best natural leader on the roster, Lightfoot’s voice is one the coaches will want and his teammates will need to hear during the next few weeks. And there’s no doubt that he’s up for that challenge.

• David McCormack – Fresh off an overseas exhibition stint in Belgium, where he nearly averaged a double-double while helping his team finish 6-0, McCormack needs to carry that momentum into preseason workouts and bring all of the confidence from learning he can hang with other college players to KU’s practice gym.

• Charlie Moore – The best thing Moore can do is focus on trying to push Dotson every day and in every way. Doing so will be good for both players and will help firm up the point guard position.

• Lagerald Vick – By nature of his age and his position, Vick is the only guy on this roster who can say he knows exactly how Mason, Graham, Svi and even a guy like Wayne Selden worked and carried themselves. Others should listen when he does. Not known for being the biggest talker, Vick can pick his spots to speak up while continuing to try to school everyone in every drill the Jayhawks do at the same time. The latter comes naturally to Vick. The former will take some work, but comes with the territory of being the lone senior on the roster.

Reply 7 comments from Buddhadude Larrym Ronfranklin Jwokker78 Joe Ross The_muser

Kansas Basketball Record Watch 2018-19: Quentin Grimes

Kansas commit Quentin Grimes (4) in action during the Jordan Brand Classic high school basketball game, Sunday, April 8, 2018, in Brooklyn, N.Y. Grimes' team won the game.

Kansas commit Quentin Grimes (4) in action during the Jordan Brand Classic high school basketball game, Sunday, April 8, 2018, in Brooklyn, N.Y. Grimes' team won the game.

A couple of months ago, when KU junior Udoka Azubuike announced he would return for his junior season at Kansas instead of trying to make it in the NBA, the first thing that popped into my head was where Azubuike stood in KU’s record books in a few key areas.

Granted, because he missed all but 11 games of his freshman season and also missed time during his sophomore season, Azubuike has not exactly played the kind of games or logged the amount of minutes to make a real push for any of KU’s biggest records.

But surely there are some that, after a monster junior season, could be a factor for Azubuike, right?

And if that’s the case, couldn’t that be true for just about every scholarship player on KU’s roster?

I mean, we all can agree that Quentin Grimes isn’t going to finish his first year at Kansas — and possibly his only year here — as the school’s all-time leading scorer, but could he make a push for KU’s freshman scoring record?

Last year’s KU media guide featured 19 full pages of school records. So over the next several days, we’re going to take a look at (a) what records some of these guys might be closing in on, if any, and (b) which record(s) each KU player could realistically make a run at during the 2018-19 season.

Some of it might be a stretch. But, hey, it’s August, and even if some of what you’ll read in the next few days isn’t likely, it’s still kind of fun to think about the best case scenarios in a sort of what-if mentality.

Next up: Quentin Grimes

It’s pretty tough sledding for a KU freshman to make a name for himself in the Kansas record books.

Think about it. Names like Wilt Chamberlain, Danny Manning, Josh Jackson, Andrew Wiggins, Joel Embiid and others sit at the top of most freshman records, with marks that, in many instances, seem absolutely unbreakable.

Whether they are or not is always good fodder for debate, and if any of them are ever broken, those likely would come out of nowhere. It’s hard to predict a KU sophomore ripping down more than the 31 rebounds Chamberlain grabbed on Dec. 7, 1957 against Northwestern.

With that in mind, let’s turn our attention to Mr. Grimes, a highly touted, do-everything guard who has the size and skill to score inside and out and figures to be on the floor a lot for the Jayhawks this year.

It’s hard to imagine Grimes or anyone else on this deep and loaded KU roster averaging more than 20 points per game for the season, but is it that hard to envision Grimes coming out of the gate with a bang?

OK, the fact that the Jayhawks open the season against Michigan State makes it a little tougher to picture, but, hey, when you’re hot you’re hot and I don’t think it’s a huge stretch to picture Grimes ending KU’s season opener on Nov. 6 in Indianapolis with the KU record for most points in a freshman debut.

Xavier Henry, with 27 against Hofstra in 2009, currently owns the record, so Grimes would have to grab 28 in KU’s opener to replace him in the KU record book.

Here’s how that might look:

8 of 9 from the free throw line = 8 points 4 of 5 from 3-point range = 12 points
4 of 7 from 2-point range = 8 points

Is it really that crazy to think that Grimes could connect on 8 of 12 shots while also getting to the free throw line eight or nine times?

Not to me.

And I think the smart money is on Grimes doing something in the form of a single-game record than a season-long record just because of how stacked that career list of freshman at Kansas already is.

• Kansas Basketball Record Watch 2018-19 •

- Senior guard Lagerald Vick

- Junior center Udoka Azubuike

- Junior forward Mitch Lightfoot

- Junior forward Dedric Lawson

- Sophomore guard Charlie Moore

Reply 2 comments from 1stnamemistermiddlenameperiod Longhawk1976

Kansas Basketball Record Watch 2018-19: Charlie Moore

Blue Team guard Charlie Moore  brings the ball up the court during a scrimmage on Wednesday, June 7, 2017 at the Horejsi Family Athletics Center.

Blue Team guard Charlie Moore brings the ball up the court during a scrimmage on Wednesday, June 7, 2017 at the Horejsi Family Athletics Center. by Nick Krug

A couple of months ago, when KU junior Udoka Azubuike announced he would return for his junior season at Kansas instead of trying to make it in the NBA, the first thing that popped into my head was where Azubuike stood in KU’s record books in a few key areas.

Granted, because he missed all but 11 games of his freshman season and also missed time during his sophomore season, Azubuike has not exactly played the kind of games or logged the amount of minutes to make a real push for any of KU’s biggest records.

But surely there are some that, after a monster junior season, could be a factor for Azubuike, right?

And if that’s the case, couldn’t that be true for just about every scholarship player on KU’s roster?

I mean, we all can agree that Quentin Grimes isn’t going to finish his first year at Kansas — and possibly his only year here — as the school’s all-time leading scorer, but could he make a push for KU’s freshman scoring record?

Last year’s KU media guide featured 19 full pages of school records. So over the next several days, we’re going to take a look at (a) what records some of these guys might be closing in on, if any, and (b) which record(s) each KU player could realistically make a run at during the 2018-19 season.

Some of it might be a stretch. But, hey, it’s August, and even if some of what you’ll read in the next few days isn’t likely, it’s still kind of fun to think about the best case scenarios in a sort of what-if mentality.

Next up: Charlie Moore

We’re starting to reach the point of having to stretch a little for some of these “records” — unless you think I’ve already gone down that path — and it’s time to start looking at accomplishments that merely show up in KU’s record book instead of predicting season or career records for the rest of KU’s players.

That takes us to the defensive end of the floor for sophomore transfer Charlie Moore, who will open the semester next week competing with freshman Devon Dotson for a starting job.

I can’t see Moore cracking any of the major KU records for steals — most steals in a season, most steals in a game, etc. — but it would not surprise me at all if Moore winds up as the 2019 entry under the section in the record book that reads “Year-By-Year Leaders.”

Devonte’ Graham, who dotted his name all over the KU record book during the past couple of seasons, was the 2018 entry, with 62, and Josh Jackson (59) and Graham again (55) were the leaders in 2017 and 2016.

Before that it was Frank Mason III in 2015 (50), Andrew Wiggins in 2014 (41) and Travis Releford in 2013 (47).

Regardless of whether he starts or even how much he plays, I think Moore can get to those types of numbers during the 2018-19 season.

Here’s why.

During the 2015-16 season at Cal, Moore started 34 games, played nearly 30 minutes a game (28.8 mpg) and had an important role in running the team, scoring and leading the Golden Bears’ defense.

And Moore has improved a heck of a lot since then.

Not only is he bigger and stronger, but he also is more experienced as a student of the game and learned a lot from some talented and experienced Jayhawks who were out there in the battles while he sat out during his transfer season.

Moore recorded 34 steals during his lone season with the Cal program and that was as a true freshman while he was still figuring out how to adjust to the college game and play it at a high level.

The advancements in his game surely will help him defensively this season and his lightning-fast hands — they might be the quickest on the team — figure to give him a chance to lead this year’s Jayhawks in steals.

Add to that the fact that KU’s depth in the backcourt will give head coach Bill Self the opportunity to sub as often as he likes and you’re looking at a group of guards who figure to play with a heightened sense of urgency when they are on the floor.

The easiest way to stay there while playing for Self? Play terrific defense.

Moore has the ability to do that. And if his teammates join him, that could mean even more steals for Moore, who will have the luxury of pressuring and hounding his man as high on the court as he wants knowing that neither fatigue nor a thin front court will be issues for this Kansas team.

Moore’s KU teammates Lagerald Vick (34 steals last year) and Marcus Garrett (35) figure to be the Cal transfer’s stiffest competition in the steals department this season and it’s not crazy to think that all three players could top 40, maybe even 50, steals during the 2018-19 season.

If they do, that’s a great sign for the Kansas defense and yet another horrible sign for the rest of the Big 12 Conference.

• Kansas Basketball Record Watch 2018-19 •

- Senior guard Lagerald Vick

- Junior center Udoka Azubuike

- Junior forward Mitch Lightfoot

- Junior forward Dedric Lawson

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KU freshman David McCormack nearly averaging a double-double in overseas contests

Blue Team center David McCormack pulls back to dunk during a scrimmage on Tuesday, June 5, 2018, at the Horejsi Athletic Center. In back is Red Team forward Mitch Lightfoot.

Blue Team center David McCormack pulls back to dunk during a scrimmage on Tuesday, June 5, 2018, at the Horejsi Athletic Center. In back is Red Team forward Mitch Lightfoot. by Nick Krug

Kansas forward David McCormack is enjoying a strong showing during his overseas exhibition tour with Global Sports Academy in Belgium.

In five games this week — all victories — McCormack has posted averages of 11 points and 9 rebounds per game, three times reaching double figures in scoring and recording a double-double of 10 points and 15 rebounds in the team’s 92-60 debut victory over the Antwerp Giants last Sunday.

McCormack, the 6-foot-10, 265-pound freshman from Oak Hill Academy, followed up his overseas debut with a 12-point, 8-rebound effort in a 13-point Game 2 victory over Team Solingen and combined for 18 points and 13 rebounds in Games 3 and 4, a 91-84 victory over Team Sijsele on Monday and a 91-81 victory over Team Almere on Tuesday.

In the team’s latest victory, a 114-71 win on Wednesday, McCormack was one of nine players to reach double figures.

Global Sports Academy coach Kerry Keating, formerly the head coach at Santa Clara and the son of current KU administrator Larry Keating has provided some feedback and a few updates on Twitter following each game.

“Lot of fun with this crew this week, and also found out some of the offensive sets work,” Keating wrote with enthusiasm on social media. “Guys have been very coachable and made the (after timeout situations) fun to give them something simple and challenge their execution. They have been very good in that and bodes well for their teams when they return to school next week.”

McCormack and Global Sports Academy will look to improve to 6-0 today, with an exhibition finale in Bruges, and will return to the United States later this week. He is expected to report to KU’s campus on time for the start of the fall semester and preseason workouts next week.

McCormack is one of two current Jayhawks who spent time overseas this summer, joining Charlie Moore, who two weeks ago played four games in Italy under Hall of Fame coach Larry Brown with the USA East Coast squad.

Moore’s team finished 4-0 and the KU guard played roughly 15 minutes per game while coming off the bench as the team’s secondary point guard. Moore was among the team’s assist leaders.

Global Sports Academy was founded in 1991, with its goal being to create and arrange athletic competition between equally matched teams at all levels internationally.

Promoting goodwill and a better understanding between nations through sports is the organization’s main point of emphasis.

Here’s a quick look at Keating’s thoughts from what clearly has been a good experience for the KU freshman thus far.

None by Kerry Keating

Here's a video of McCormack (No. 33 in white) in live game action.

None by GlobalSportsAcademy

None by GlobalSportsAcademy

Reply 4 comments from Tony Bandle Carsonc30 Shannon Gustafson Ryan Zimmerman

Former KU guard Sam Cunliffe headed to Evansville

Kansas guard Sam Cunliffe (3) elevates into Iowa State forward Hans Brase (30) on a charge during the first half, Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas guard Sam Cunliffe (3) elevates into Iowa State forward Hans Brase (30) on a charge during the first half, Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

In the end, the right fit won out over the chance to finish his career closer to his hometown of Seattle.

Either way, former Kansas guard Sam Cunliffe on Tuesday announced via Twitter that he was headed to Evansville, where he will sit out the 2018-19 season and have two years of eligibility remaining following his redshirt season.

“Thank you Jesus for this opportunity,” Cunliffe Tweeted above a photoshopped image of his back in an Evansville jersey with the Purple Aces’ logo at the top of the image as the centerpiece in the phrase, “Be A Legend.”

Cunliffe, who visited Xavier over the weekend and also considered Grand Canyon, Pepperdine, Washington, Fresno State, Minnesota and others, told the Journal-World over the weekend that “this Evansville thing is a lot better than some might think.”

Led by former Kentucky great Walter McCarty, who enjoyed a 10-year NBA career — most of it coming with the Boston Celtics — Evansville is coming off of a 17-15 season that ended with a loss to Northern Iowa in the opening round of the Missouri Valley Conference postseason tournament.

Cunliffe’s addition gives the Purple Aces a full roster of 13 scholarship players and the former Top 40 prep prospect who transferred to Kansas from Arizona State will be joined at Evansville by fellow transfer Artur Labinowicz, a 6-foot-4 guard who played the past two seasons at Coastal Carolina and will join Cunliffe in sitting out during the upcoming season.

None by Sam I Am

Reply 9 comments from Carsonc30 Ronfranklin Kansasalumn Jim Stauffer Marcus  Balzer Forever2008 Chad Sandwell Dirk Medema Jessej421

Kansas Basketball Record Watch 2018-19: Dedric Lawson

Dedric Lawson puts up a shot during a scrimmage on Wednesday, June 7, 2017 at the Horejsi Family Athletics Center.

Dedric Lawson puts up a shot during a scrimmage on Wednesday, June 7, 2017 at the Horejsi Family Athletics Center. by Nick Krug

A couple of months ago, when KU junior Udoka Azubuike announced he would return for his junior season at Kansas instead of trying to make it in the NBA, the first thing that popped into my head was where Azubuike stood in KU’s record books in a few key areas.

Granted, because he missed all but 11 games of his freshman season and also missed time during his sophomore season, Azubuike has not exactly played the kind of games or logged the amount of minutes to make a real push for any of KU’s biggest records.

But surely there are some that, after a monster junior season, could be a factor for Azubuike, right?

And if that’s the case, couldn’t that be true for just about every scholarship player on KU’s roster?

I mean, we all can agree that Quentin Grimes isn’t going to finish his first year at Kansas — and possibly his only year here — as the school’s all-time leading scorer, but could he make a push for KU’s freshman scoring record?

Last year’s KU media guide featured 19 full pages of school records. So over the next several days, we’re going to take a look at (a) what records some of these guys might be closing in on, if any, and (b) which record(s) each KU player could realistically make a run at during the 2018-19 season.

Some of it might be a stretch. But, hey, it’s August, and even if some of what you’ll read in the next few days isn’t likely, it’s still kind of fun to think about the best case scenarios in a sort of what-if mentality.

Next up: Dedric Lawson

The hopes and expectations are high for the Memphis transfer who many believe could be KU’s best player and leading scorer during the 2018-19 campaign.

And why wouldn’t they be?

With Lawson’s good size, natural scoring ability, skills near the basket and on the perimeter and terrific vision and feel on the offensive end, the possibilities for his season and contributions are endless.

After averaging 18 points and 10 rebounds during his second season at Memphis before transferring to KU, Lawson proved that he can put up big numbers at the Div. I level. And he’s only grown as a player and improved his game since then.

Add to that the fact that KU coach Bill Self has said that Lawson might be this team’s best passer on top of all of those other skills and you’re looking at a guy who could very well record just the third official triple-double in KU history at some point during the upcoming season.

I realize that recording a triple-double isn’t exactly the same as setting a record. But at a place like KU, where it has only happened twice, it’s pretty much the same thing.

Cole Alrdich, with 13 points, 20 rebounds and 10 blocks in the 2009 NCAA Tournament, recorded KU’s first official triple-double. And Jeff Withey, with 16 points, 12 rebounds and 12 blocks during a regular season game at Allen Fieldhouse in 2012, snagged the second.

The KU media guide shows that Wilt Chamberlain had a couple of his own but they came before blocks were recognized as an official statistic. On top of that, both Frank Mason III and Devonte’ Graham found themselves in triple-double watches during the past couple of seasons, but neither player quite got there.

Lawson can and I think he will, with the points and rebounds coming as a result of what he does and double-digit assists coming off of easy lobs and drop-offs to Udoka Azubuike and kick-outs to KU’s guards on the perimeter.

Let’s say 15 points, 13 rebounds and 11 assists.

It might not be a record that Lawson owns alone, but it’ll wind up in the record book and that’s good enough for me.

• Kansas Basketball Record Watch 2018-19 •

- Senior guard Lagerald Vick

- Junior center Udoka Azubuike

- Junior forward Mitch Lightfoot

Reply 9 comments from Sam Allen Buddhadude Dirk Medema Dale Rogers Robert  Brock

Kansas Basketball Record Watch 2018-19: Mitch Lightfoot

Kansas forward Mitch Lightfoot (44) blocks a shot from TCU forward Vladimir Brodziansky (10) during the second half, Saturday, Jan. 6, 2018 at Schollmaier Arena. At right is Kansas guard Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk (10).

Kansas forward Mitch Lightfoot (44) blocks a shot from TCU forward Vladimir Brodziansky (10) during the second half, Saturday, Jan. 6, 2018 at Schollmaier Arena. At right is Kansas guard Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk (10). by Nick Krug

A couple of months ago, when KU junior Udoka Azubuike announced he would return for his junior season at Kansas instead of trying to make it in the NBA, the first thing that popped into my head was where Azubuike stood in KU’s record books in a few key areas.

Granted, because he missed all but 11 games of his freshman season and also missed time during his sophomore season, Azubuike has not exactly played the kind of games or logged the amount of minutes to make a real push for any of KU’s biggest records.

But surely there are some that, after a monster junior season, could be a factor for Azubuike, right?

And if that’s the case, couldn’t that be true for just about every scholarship player on KU’s roster?

I mean, we all can agree that Quentin Grimes isn’t going to finish his first year at Kansas — and possibly his only year here — as the school’s all-time leading scorer, but could he make a push for KU’s freshman scoring record?

Last year’s KU media guide featured 19 full pages of school records. So over the next several days, we’re going to take a look at (a) what records some of these guys might be closing in on, if any, and (b) which record(s) each KU player could realistically make a run at during the 2018-19 season.

Some of it might be a stretch. But, hey, it’s August, and even if some of what you’ll read in the next few days isn’t likely, it’s still kind of fun to think about the best case scenarios in a sort of what-if mentality.

Next up: Mitch Lightfoot

Let’s be honest, because of his status as a reserve big man and his potential to redshirt the 2018-19 season to begin with, there aren’t a lot of records out there for Lightfoot to go after.

Despite having played in 64 career games during his first two seasons as a Jayhawk — including seven starts a year ago — Lightfoot has not had enough of a role, consistently, to amass a bunch of significant stats that put him on pace for any career records.

Add to that the fact that his minutes, should he get some this season, figure to be limited because of the depth and talent of KU’s front line and it’s hard to envision Lightfoot achieving any single season or even single game records in the immediate future.

But there is one out there — though a long shot it may be — that Lightfoot could go after if he encounters one of those nights where everything clicks and he finds himself in the right place at the right time — all the time — with the ability to deliver at his finger tips.

If there’s one thing Lightfoot has shown with pretty impressive consistency during his first two years in the program — other than his willingness to answer every challenge and flash toughness whenever possible — it’s that he can be a pretty effective shot blocker.

Lightfoot is equally skilled at blocking shots taken by the man he is guarding and in help D, and opponents have shown a tendency to underestimate his length and athleticism while challenging him near the rim.

Lightfoot was second on the team with 54 blocks a season ago, just six fewer than team leader Udoka Azubuike, who playegd 317 more minutes than Lightfoot, roughly 10 games.

He finished with three blocks or more in seven of the 38 games he played in, including a six-block performance in a Big 12 road win at TCU.

Six is the key number here because that’s also the KU record for most blocks in a single half of a conference game. Obscure, I know. And I know that six blocks in a 20-minute half is a whole different story than six blocks in a 40-minute game, but six blocks is six blocks and Lightfoot has proven he can get to that number if given the chance.

For what it’s worth, he played 26 minutes in that TCU win.

The odds are stacked against Lightfoot getting many 26-minute nights during the 2018-19 season, but if there’s a record out there for him to get it’s got to be this one.

• Kansas Basketball Record Watch 2018-19 •

- Senior guard Lagerald Vick

- Junior center Udoka Azubuike

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Kansas Basketball Record Watch 2018-19: Lagerald Vick

Kansas guard Lagerald Vick (2) puts up a three against Toledo guard Marreon Jackson (3) during the first half on Tuesday, Nov. 28, 2017 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas guard Lagerald Vick (2) puts up a three against Toledo guard Marreon Jackson (3) during the first half on Tuesday, Nov. 28, 2017 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

A couple of months ago, when KU junior Udoka Azubuike announced he would return for his junior season at Kansas instead of trying to make it in the NBA, the first thing that popped into my head was where Azubuike stood in KU’s record books in a few key areas.

Granted, because he missed all but 11 games of his freshman season and also missed time during his sophomore season, Azubuike has not exactly played the kind of games or logged the amount of minutes to make a real push for any of KU’s biggest records.

But surely there are some that, after a monster junior season, could be a factor for Azubuike, right?

And if that’s the case, couldn’t that be true for just about every scholarship player on KU’s roster?

I mean, we all can agree that Quentin Grimes isn’t going to finish his first year at Kansas — and possibly his only year here — as the school’s all-time leading scorer, but could he make a push for KU’s freshman scoring record?

Last year’s KU media guide featured 19 full pages of school records. So over the next several days, we’re going to take a look at (a) what records some of these guys might be closing in on, if any, and (b) which record(s) each KU player could realistically make a run at during the 2018-19 season.

Some of it might be a stretch. But, hey, it’s August, and even if some of what you’ll read in the next few days isn’t likely, it’s still kind of fun to think about the best case scenarios in a sort of what-if mentality.

Next up: Lagerald Vick

From what I can tell, there are two main schools of thought on the topic of Vick the 3-point shooter during his senior season.

The first is that, as the best and most proven and accomplished 3-point marksman on the roster, Vick is going to get a bunch of plays run for him and find a lot of open space to step into and knock down rhythm 3-pointers. Part of that is his status as the best knock-down shooter on the roster and also the extra room that figures to exist on the perimeter given KU’s depth and talent down low.

The second school of thought is that, as the most proven and accomplished 3-point marksman on the roster, Vick is going to get the most attention from opposing defenders, who will look to force anyone but Vick to beat them from the outside, therein giving the KU senior very little room to get off shots and torch the nets from distance.

I’m in the first group and I think Vick — both because of confidence and status — will have a chance to be a real weapon from the outside regardless of whether he starts or how many minutes he plays.

As much because of KU’s style as his own skill, I can’t imagine Vick following in the shoes of Devonte’ Graham and Svi, who both made more than 100 3-pointers last season. But I don’t think it’s crazy to think he could set a career high and top the 59 that he made last season.

If he does that, and if he succeeds in achieving the goal of efficiency over volume — that’s been a huge emphasis for KU’s coaching staff this summer — Vick might have a real shot at KU’s career 3-point percentage record.

Milt Newton (1985-89) is the current holder of that record, having knocked down 100 of 224 career 3-point attempts for a 44.6 clip, which puts him just ahead of Jeff Gueldner (90 of 205, 43.9), Brandon Rush (205 of 471, 43.5) and Kirk Hinrich (236 of 546, 43.2) as the only four KU players to finish their careers above 43 percent.

In order to get there, under the parameters outlined above, Vick would need to hit 65 of 104 3-point attempts this season, which would give him career totals of 166 makes and 371 attempts for a 44.7 percent total.

Should he get it that way, Vick also would eclipse Hinrich’s single-season percentage record by draining an incredible 62.5 percent of his 3-point shots during his senior season. Hinrich made 55 of 109 (50.5 percent) during the 2000-01 season.

Vick making nearly 63 percent of his 3-point attempts this season would probably wind up as a more improbable and incredible feat than Azubuike draining 77 percent of his field goals a season ago.

But given the style the Jayhawks figure to utilize and Vick’s status as an aggressive and confident senior, this certainly qualifies as his most attainable major record during the 2018-19 season, slightly ahead of tying or passing Jeff Boschee for most 3-pointers in a single half (7) or something like most 3-point attempts without a miss.

• Record Watch: Udoka Azubuike

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