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Posts tagged with 2017-18 Season

Postgame Report Card: Kansas 114, Texas Southern 71

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) raises up the Fieldhouse after a string of buckets during the first half, Tuesday, Nov. 21, 2017.

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) raises up the Fieldhouse after a string of buckets during the first half, Tuesday, Nov. 21, 2017. by Nick Krug

Quick grades for five aspects of KU’s 114-71 rout of Texas Southern on Tuesday night at Allen Fieldhouse.

Offense: A+

55 percent from the floor, 53 percent from 3-point range, a school record 19 made 3-pointers, just seven turnovers and 17 offensive rebounds. All of that, and so much more, led to an easy and entertaining night for the Kansas offense, which enjoyed seven players reaching double figures.

Defense: A

Coach Self can nitpick this one, but I'm not going to. Any time you beat somebody by 40 points while limiting them to 37 percent shooting and a -16 mark on the glass, you're going to get an A from me. This was never a game and even though the KU offense was a big reason for that, the defense certainly did its part to help.

Frontcourt: B

Udoka Azubuike fnished one rebound shy of a double-double (20 points and 9 boards) and made 9 of 12 shots from the floor. All of those numbers are good but Self seemed a little less than thrilled about Azubuike's overall night. Add to that the fact that Self pointed out the 3 rebounds by Mitch Lightfoot in 23, while adding, “He's got to do better,” and KU's thin frontcourt gets a passing grade but not an A.

Backcourt: A

Of KU's guards, Graham shot it the worst (6-of-16) but made up for it with 11 assists. Malik Newman, meanwhile, shot 4-of-6 from 3-point range but also took a couple of bad shots and turned it over twice. There were a few things from the KU guards that were far from perfect — particularly their energy in the second half, but, hey, human nature, right? — but nothing that even threatened to take this down from a solid A.

Bench: A

We might as well call this the Marcus Garrett grade and he was terrific. Thirteen points, 11 rebounds, active as always. What a luxury it is for the Jayhawks to have a player like Garrett, who is so steady and wise beyond his years and can fill in at any one of KU's four guard positions.

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Jayhawks jump to No. 3 in latest AP poll

Kansas center Udoka Azubuike (35) delivers a dunk before South Dakota State guard Tevin King (2) during the first half on Friday, Nov. 17, 2017 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas center Udoka Azubuike (35) delivers a dunk before South Dakota State guard Tevin King (2) during the first half on Friday, Nov. 17, 2017 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

On the heels of a victory in Chicago over then-No. 7 Kentucky, the Kansas men's basketball team moved up one spot to No. 3 in this week's Associated Press poll.

The top two spots remained the same, with Duke (4-0) and Arizona (3-0) staying put, and Kansas leapfrogged Michigan State (2-1), which fell from No. 3 to No. 4 following its loss to Duke in Game 1 of the Champions Classic last week in the Windy City.

Kentucky (3-1), meanwhile, fell for the second consecutive week, dropping to No. 8 after its loss to KU and an uninspired home victory over East Tennessee State last Friday night.

Kansas (3-0) returns to action this week for a pair of games, starting with Tuesday's home matchup with Texas Southern and a Friday night clash with Oakland at Allen Fieldhouse.

In all, the latest AP poll features three teams from the Big 12 Conference ranked in the Top 25 and four others who are receiving votes.

As has been the norm, Kansas is far and away the torch bearer for the Big 12, with the Jayhawks holding down a spot in the Top 5 and Baylor and West Virginia coming at No. 22 and No. 23.

Complete AP Preseason Poll:

1 - Duke (54)

2 - Arizona (11)

3 - Kansas

4 - Michigan State

5 - Villanova

6 - Wichita State

7 - Florida

8 - Kentucky

9 - North Carolina

10 - USC

11 - Miami, Fla.

12 - Cincinnati

13 - Notre Dame

14 - Minnesota

15 - Xavier

16 - Texas A&M

17 - Gonzaga

18 - Purdue

19 - Louisville

20 - Seton Hall

21 - Saint Mary's

22 - Baylor

23 - West Virginia

24 - UCLA

25 - Alabama

Others receiving votes: Virginia 93, Texas Tech 81, TCU 36, Northwestern 20, Nevada 19, Providence 11, Maryland 9, Michigan 9, Texas 7, Creighton 6, Oklahoma 5, Temple 4, Arkansas 3, UT-Arlington 2, Rhode Island 1, Belmont 1, Stephen F. Austin 1.

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Tuesday night marks special anniversary for KU coach Bill Self

Kansas University's Keith Langford (5) dives for the ball and
teammate J.R. Giddens closes in as Tennessee-Chattanooga's Casey
Long hits the deck in the Jayhawks' 90-76 victory. KU opened its
season with a victory Friday at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas University's Keith Langford (5) dives for the ball and teammate J.R. Giddens closes in as Tennessee-Chattanooga's Casey Long hits the deck in the Jayhawks' 90-76 victory. KU opened its season with a victory Friday at Allen Fieldhouse. by Scott McClurg/Journal-World Photo

When taking my regular look through the game notes for Kansas' next contest — 7 p.m. Friday vs. Texas Southern at Allen Fieldhouse — a few things jumped out at me.

For one, Texas Southern is coached by former Indiana boss Mike Davis, who once led the Hoosiers to the national title game back in 2002.

For two, the Tigers are playing their first 13 games of the 2017-18 season on the road, an experiment that has been done before — even by at least one recent KU opponent — but always seems so incredible to me given the fact that KU plays nearly all of its non-conference games in cozy Allen Fieldhouse.

But while those two nuggets were interesting, by far the most notable of the bunch was the section called “This Day In Kansas Basketball History.”

It's a regular feature in the game notes, but rarely does it deliver such an interesting trip down Memory Lane.

On Nov. 21, 2003, 14 years ago, Kansas coach Bill Self coached in and won his first game as a Jayhawk.

Since that night, Self has racked up 418 more victories, two trips to the Final Four, two appearances in the national title game, one national championship, 13 consecutive Big 12 titles and a short trip to Springfield, Mass., to be inducted into the Hall of Fame, coached his first game as a Jayhawk.

Looking back at the game revealed that the Bill Self era got off to a less than memorable start.

Kansas trailed visiting Tennessee-Chattanooga early on, 24-14, and, seemed to be still searching for its identity under Self, who, that night, became the first man not named Roy Williams to walk the KU sidelines since the 1987-88 season.

After the victory, which was sparked by a 28-6 run late in the first half, Self even joked about his first few minutes in charge of the Jayhawks.

“We got off to such a great start,” Self dead-panned of the beginning of his first game as leader of the Jayhawks. "We didn't play as bad as the score, and they played really well.”

While Kansas went on to win, 90-76, delivering Self his first of 419 KU victories (and counting), most of the talk after the game was about how energized the former Illinois, Tulsa and Oral Roberts coach was to get his career going with the Jayhawks.

“He was so pumped up, if he could have put on a uniform, he'd have been out there,” said junior guard Keith Langford of KU's then-40-year-old, first-year coach.

Added junior forward Wayne Simien: "We wanted to make sure he'd get his career here off on the right foot. We showed how hard we could play, getting loose balls. You saw us hit the floor three or four times. There was a sense of urgency tonight for everybody, not just coach Self, but us, too.”

Self admitted after the victory that his KU debut had a different feeling than nearly all of the 300-plus games he had coached leading up to that point. But he also said he felt very few nerves and sounded an awful lot like the man who has Kansas out to a 3-0 start in his 15th season in charge.

“I was excited,” he said. “I don't think I was over-excited," "They (players) knew I was excited, probably. We were so bad in practice yesterday, I almost felt I had to kind of be that way tonight, kind of make sure everybody's spirits were up because yesterday wasn't quite as pleasant as some other days we've had. “I'm glad the way this turned out. I'll be extra glad if the second one turns out as well.”

As it turned out, it did, with Kansas topping Michigan State, 81-74, at Allen Fieldhouse just four days later.

For what it's worth, KU is 6-1 all-time on Nov. 21.

Kansas University head coach Bill Self, left, talks to freshman
guard J.R. Giddens in the first half against Pittsburg State Nov.
11 at Allen Fieldhouse. Self will coach his first regular-season
game at KU tonight against Tennessee-Chattanooga.

Kansas University head coach Bill Self, left, talks to freshman guard J.R. Giddens in the first half against Pittsburg State Nov. 11 at Allen Fieldhouse. Self will coach his first regular-season game at KU tonight against Tennessee-Chattanooga. by Thad Allender/Journal-World Photo

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Five-star guard Quentin Grimes picks Kansas

Kansas University basketball recruiting

Kansas University basketball recruiting

With an elite point guard and two Top 40 big men already signed, sealed and delivered, the Kansas men's basketball program's 2018 recruiting class added another gem on Wednesday, when five-star shooting guard Quentin Grimes orally committed to KU during a ceremony at College Park High in The Woodlands, Texas.

Grimes, 6-foot-5, 190 pounds, picked KU over finalists Kentucky, Marquette and Texas and said simply that it was his relationship with the KU coaching staff that inspired him to become a Jayhawk.

After thanking his friends, family, teammates, coaches and all of the schools that recruited him, "especially my final four," Grimes said simply, "I'd like to announce that next year I'll be attending the University of Kansas."

With that, and with his parents Tonja and Marshall sitting on each side of him, Grimes stood up, flashed a huge smile and held up a white No. 5 KU jersey.

His parents then joined the fun and removed their top layers to reveal their crimson and blue KU clothing. Several members of the audience then broke into the Rock Chalk chant to thunderous applause from the rest of the gym.

Grimes' commitment comes on the final day of the early signing period and ends a recruitment that had strong Kansas flavor from start to finish.

“They were real straight up and straightforward with me that I’m the best guard in the country,” Grimes told Rivals.com's Eric Bossi after a visit with Kansas during the recruiting process. “They basically told me that I have to sign with them.... They said have to get me, they were very clear on that.”

Ranked No. 11 in the class by Rivals.com and No. 16 overall in 247 Sports' composite rankings, Grimes is a gifted athlete known for his versatility and unselfish style, which makes him a terrific fit to play alongside true point guard Devon Dotson, who signed his letter of intent with Kansas last week.

The addition of Grimes adds symmetry to KU's current recruiting class, with two elite perimeter players and two physically imposing big men on their way to becoming Jayhawks.

The good news for Kansas, which is playing the current season with an open scholarship, — although that could change next month if five-star big man Silvio De Sousa is cleared to come to college early and allowed to play during the second semester — is that there's still time and room to add more to an already stellar class.

With senior guards Devonte' Graham and Svi Mykhailiuk graduating and underclassmen Malik Newman, Billy Preston, Lagerald Vick and Udoka Azbuike all potentially NBA-bound after this season, the Jayhawks not only would need to fill the spots vacated by those departures but also would have the scholarships available to do so.

That gives Self and company room to continue pursuing Top 10 talents Zion Williamson and Romeo Langford in the 2018 recruiting class.

While landing Dotson (6-1, 180, No. 17 per Rivals.com), De Sousa (6-9, 245, No. 25) and David McCormack (6-10, 280, No. 33) put the Jayhawks in the No. 2 or No. 3 spots in many recruiting sites' team rankings for the Class of 2018, the addition of Grimes is expected to be enough of a splash to move Kansas into the No. 1 position.

According to 247 Sports analyst Jerry Meyer, Grimes “is the most physical player of all the top lead guards in the class and has the versatility to play the two and the three. He gets where he wants on the court, is a three-level scorer, has great court vision and is a solid defender and rebounder.”

Reply 18 comments from Kustill1 Dirk Medema Lewis Gdkadjayhawk Dannyboy4hawks Joe Ross Len Shaffer Adam Gerval Matt Tait Mike Greer and 7 others

Postgame Report Card: No. 4 Kansas 65, No. 7 Kentucky 61

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) pressures Kentucky guard Shai Gilgeous-Alexander (22) during the first half on Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017 at United Center.

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) pressures Kentucky guard Shai Gilgeous-Alexander (22) during the first half on Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017 at United Center. by Nick Krug

Quick grades for five aspects of KU’s 65-61 victory over No. 7 Kentucky in the 2017 Champions Classic at United Center in Chicago.

Offense: C-

The Jayhawks made a couple of big shots and plays when they had to have them. And Devonte' Graham and Malik Newman delivered at the free throw line in the closing minutes on an otherwise miserable free-throw-shooting night. Those two factors saved the passing grade. Otherwise, KU had a major off night, shooting just 35.3 percent for the game and struggling to work good offensive possessions time and time again.

Defense: B-

KU coach Bill Self said after the game that his team dirtied up the game in order to survive and a big chunk of that came on defense. KU limited Kentucky to 41.8 percent shooting and snagged a dozen steals while playing even on the glass. Beyond that, the Jayhawks allowed Kentucky to hit just three 3-pointers all game.

Frontcourt: B

They had just one big man for the most part, as Udoka Azubuike and Mitch Lightfoot combined to play 40 minutes, but Azubuike came through when his team needed him most. His production was much bigger than his 13 points and eight rebounds suggests and, by far the most important thing he did was stay out of foul trouble.

Backcourt: B-

The Kansas guards hit some big shots at clutch times, but overall endured a miserable shooting night. Devonte' Graham and Malik Newman combined to make just 7 of 28 attempts and Lagerald Vick and Svi Mykhailiuk weren't much better. The guards did enough to win on a night when Kansas didn't have anyone else to go to. And the fact that they still found a way to beat a Top 10 team on such an off shooting night illustrates how well they did in others areas.

Bench: C

Marcus Garrett hit a big 3-pointer in the second half and swiped a couple of steals. Mitch Lightfoot competed but didn't produce much in his six minutes on the floor. Given that fact, the bench production, which came from an extremely thin crew, was merely average at best.

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Say What? Tait’s weekly appearance on Rock Chalk Sports Talk

Matt Tait's game day thoughts from The Windy City ahead of Kansas vs. Kentucky in the 2017 Champions Classic in Chicago.

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Jayhawks no strangers to killing time on game day

Kansas guards Devonte' Graham, left, Malik Newman and Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk can't contain themselves as they sit for a group interview during Big 12 Media Day, Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2017 at Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo.

Kansas guards Devonte' Graham, left, Malik Newman and Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk can't contain themselves as they sit for a group interview during Big 12 Media Day, Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2017 at Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo. by Nick Krug

Ever since Kansas fans started really looking ahead to today's Champions Classic showdown with Kentucky in The Windy City, one of the most popular rants I've heard has been about how KU allllwwwaaays seems to play the late game in the Champions Classic.

They're not wrong.

Five of the six times KU has played in the event, the Jayhawks have been the late game, which usually tips off between 8 and 9 p.m., depending on where the game is played and how quickly the first game wraps up.

That will again be the case tonight for the sixth time in seven tries, when No. 4 Kansas (1-0) takes on No. 7 Kentucky (2-0) at approximately 8:30 p.m. from United Center in Chicago.

In reality, the game figures to tip-off closer to 9 p.m. than 8:30, but by that time of day, the extra 20-30 minutes is pretty much meaningless.

We know what fans of all four teams will do while waiting for tip-off — Duke and Michigan State will square off at 6 p.m. in the early game — but what about the players and coaches?

Kansas senior Devonte' Graham, who has been through three previous Champions Classic contests — all of them late tips — has the routine down.

“Coach and them do a good job of having a little layout for us,” Graham said. “We usually have shoot-around in the morning, get up and get a nice breakfast, come back and watch film and stuff like that. And then a lot of guys will just go back and take a nap. That's usually what I do, take a nice little nap.”

Music, social media, a few Z's and down time with teammates account for most of the Jayhawks' non-basketball game day routine.

There is, of course, also plenty of time for extra film work, a final walk-through and anything else the KU coaches and players think might help their preparations in the 11th hour.

But no matter what they're doing, KU coach Bill Self said he thought that waiting all day for a big game surrounded by a lot of hype was not the worst thing by any means.

“It's probably not bad experience for everybody because there's a great chance you could play a conference tournament game that late or you could play an NCAA Tournament game that late,” Self said. “You're talking about, if everything goes perfect, an 8:30 tip or something like that, which doesn't seem ridiculously bad. It seems worse if you're playing on the east coast, it'd be a 9:30 tip and then it'd seem much longer.”

The Jayhawks have been there. In fact, just last year, after the long haul from Hawaii to New York just a couple of days earlier, KU and Duke tipped off from the Big Apple right around 9 p.m.

KU won that game and tonight will be looking to improve its all-time record in the early-season, elite showcase to 3-4 with a win over the Wildcats.

To date, Kansas is 0-2 vs. Kentucky in this event, 0-2 vs. Michigan State, and 2-0 vs. Duke.

“It makes for a long day,” Self said. “But I don't think it's going to be anything where we have to change too much. Maybe let 'em sleep an hour longer or something like that.”

Reply 2 comments from Goku Carsonc30

Self vs. Calipari almost as big as Kansas vs. Kentucky

Kentucky head coach John Calipari and Kansas head coach Bill Self have a joint meeting with an official after a double technical foul during the first half, Saturday, Jan. 30, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kentucky head coach John Calipari and Kansas head coach Bill Self have a joint meeting with an official after a double technical foul during the first half, Saturday, Jan. 30, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

If you've watched Kansas play Kentucky even just once in the past 10 years, you know the game means a little more than a regular game.

Whether you're talking about the media hype leading up to tipoff, the craziness the game brings out in fans from both sides or just the incredible number of elite athletes and future pros on the floor, these KU-UK showdowns feature pretty much everything that's right about college basketball.

That extends to the sideline, where the coaching staffs at both schools are among the most accomplished and talented in the history of the game.

Bill Self and John Calipari are both in the Naismith Hall of Fame. Both have national title rings and both represent the cream of the crop when it comes to recruiting.

The rivalry, between both the schools and the coaches, will be renewed at approximately 8:30 p.m. Tuesday at United Center Chicago, where the two programs will square off for the third time in the history of the early-season showcase. Kentucky has won both of the previous meetings (2011 and 2014) and owns an all-time edge of 22-8 in head-to-head matchups with Kansas.

Because of those factors, and the fact that the game means so much to so many people, it's not uncommon for Self and Calipari to get a little crazy during these contests. Add that to the list of what's right in college basketball.

In seven meetings against each other — six for Self at Kansas and one at Illinois — Calipari owns a 4-3 advantage against Self.

All three of Self's victories against Calipari have come at Kansas, with the Jayhawks winning in each of the past two seasons and also in the 2008 national title game over Calipari's Memphis team.

Calipari's four victories over Self include one with Memphis against Self's last Illinois squad during the 2002-03 season, two with the Wildcats during the 2011-12 season (including Calipari's lone national title in 2012) and a 32-point drubbing over Kansas in the 2014 Champions Classic.

So after all these epic matchups with one another, what is the relationship like between these two blue blood bosses?

Self explained it a little on Sunday.

“There's absolutely zero ill feelings,” he said. “I certainly respect the amazing job he and his staff have done, not only at Kentucky but also at Memphis and then at UMass, as well. He's done an unbelievable job, been fabulous.”

Though the two coaches took slightly different paths to reach their spot at the top of the college basketball mountain, they both started in the same place — as graduate assistants at Kansas under Hall of Fame coach Larry Brown.

“We're somewhat connected,” Self conceded, “because we both got our start at KU. Our paths never crossed there, but I certainly have a lot of respect for everything they've done and accomplished. How could you not? I can't speak for him, but I'd say the feeling is mutual.”

Although the two elite coaches, who both serve on the board of the National Association of Basketball Coaches, figure to share a few laughs, a couple of handshakes and maybe even an icy glare or two as Tuesday's matchup unfolds, their spot on the sidelines is hardly the most competitive environment in which these two coaches find themselves operating.

Year after year, blue-chip prospect after blue-chip prospect, many of the top players in each recruiting class have Kansas and Kentucky on their shortlists. Though the two programs often are looking for different traits in their players, staples such as athleticism, speed, explosiveness and elite skill lead Calipari and Self to a lot of the same gyms and living rooms to watch and recruit a lot of the same players.

Though the scoreboard in that realm is about 50-50, like it is on the floor, Self admits that the two are equally as competitive in recruiting as they are when their teams hook up on the hardwood.

“There's absolutely no ill will or hard feelings,” Self said. “But there is something very competitive when you get Kentucky and Kansas together and, of course, if that's the case, then you'd probably think the coaches are pretty competitive, too, because we do recruit against each other quite often.”

Kansas head coach Bill Self smiles at Kentucky head coach John Calipari as the two sit for makeup before their joint CBS interview on Sunday, April 1, 2012 at the Superdome.

Kansas head coach Bill Self smiles at Kentucky head coach John Calipari as the two sit for makeup before their joint CBS interview on Sunday, April 1, 2012 at the Superdome. by Nick Krug

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KU-Kentucky set to renew unique rivalry Tuesday in Chicago

Kansas center Jeff Withey and Kentucky forward Anthony Davis go up for the opening tipoff of the national championship on Monday, April 2, 2012 in New Orleans.

Kansas center Jeff Withey and Kentucky forward Anthony Davis go up for the opening tipoff of the national championship on Monday, April 2, 2012 in New Orleans. by Nick Krug

Because they aren’t in the same conference, they do not play each other every year, although some quality scheduling during recent years has made the matchup more common.

The two teams enter Tuesday’s clash at the Champions Classic in Chicago as the No. 1 and No. 2 winningest college basketball programs of all time, separated by just 20 victories in more than 6,000 contests.

And because both are media darlings and supported by proud and rabid fan bases, any time these two get together, the scene before, during and after their showdown is as much more Hollywood as it is hardwood.

“These are the type of games that players live to play for and I'm sure Kentucky players do, as well,” Kansas coach Bill Self said. “And to be part of the Champions Classic, which is such a high-profile event, certainly is very, very cool. But the reality of it is, I'm not sure that this event, whether you win or you don't win, is going to dictate what kind of season you have.”

Kentucky vs. Kansas. The mere sound of it rings so sweet in the ears of college basketball fans everywhere. And Tuesday night, at approximately 8:30 p.m. inside United Center, the two bluebloods will hook it up for the 31st time in their storied histories.

Kentucky leads the all-time series, 22-8, and holds a 21-game advantage (2,239-2,218) over Kansas in all-time victories.

Self said Sunday afternoon that freshman forward Billy Preston, who missed KU's season opener to serve a one-game suspension, was on pace to play against Kentucky on Tuesday night. And Self added that he had not yet decided what to do about his starting lineup, which, last Friday, featured freshman Marcus Garrett starting in place of expected starter Malik Newman.

"We'll see after a couple practices," Self said.

While many of the names and faces are fresh and new chapters in this unique rivalry are waiting to be written, here’s a look back at five of the most memorable Kansas-Kentucky showdowns of all-time.

KU players gather on the court during KU's 150-95 blowout of Rick Pitino's Kentucky Wildcats in December, 1989. From left are Pekka Markkanen, Freeman West, Kevin Prichard and Jeff Gueldner. Seven KU players scored in double figures.

KU players gather on the court during KU's 150-95 blowout of Rick Pitino's Kentucky Wildcats in December, 1989. From left are Pekka Markkanen, Freeman West, Kevin Prichard and Jeff Gueldner. Seven KU players scored in double figures.

1 – Dec. 9, 1989 – No. 2 KU shreds Kentucky 150-95 at Allen Fieldhouse

Way back in 1989, during then-KU coach Roy Williams' second season in charge of the Jayhawks, Kentucky and head coach Rick Pitino came to town for an early December showdown and left on the wrong end of one of the biggest beatings in KU history. Despite Pitino's insistence on pressing the entire game, the Jayhawks shredded the UK defense for easy bucket after easy bucket from start to finish. The point total (150), first-half total (80), number of field goals made (52) and total KU assists (36) are still Kansas records. And the Jayhawks, led by 31 points from sharp-shooter Terry Brown, enjoyed a day in which six players scored at least 16 points.

Kansas forward Kevin Young takes a charge from Kentucky center Anthony Davis during the first half of the national championship on Monday, April 2, 2012 in New Orleans.

Kansas forward Kevin Young takes a charge from Kentucky center Anthony Davis during the first half of the national championship on Monday, April 2, 2012 in New Orleans. by Nick Krug

2 – April 2, 2012 – KU and Kentucky meet for the national championship in New Orleans

Five months after topping Kansas 75-65 in the Champions Classic in New York City, these two teams met again on the final Monday of the season at the Superdome, with a national title on the line. UK's lineup of future NBA draft picks and stars, led by Anthony Davis, overwhelmed the Jayhawks and built an 18-point first-half lead that stayed as high as 15 in the second half. However, behind Thomas Robinson's 18 points, 17 rebounds and huge heart, KU trimmed the Kentucky lead to 62-57 with 1:37 to play before falling, 67-59.

Kansas guard Wayne Selden Jr. (1) gets in for a bucket against Kentucky during the second half, Saturday, Jan. 30, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas guard Wayne Selden Jr. (1) gets in for a bucket against Kentucky during the second half, Saturday, Jan. 30, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

3 – Jan. 30, 2016 – No. 4 Kansas knocks off No. 20 Kentucky in overtime at Allen Fieldhouse

This one should have been dubbed Wayne Selden Jr. Night. In the first Allen Fieldhouse meeting between these two storied programs since 2006, Selden exploded for 33 points, on 12-of-20 shooting, in a game in which he played 44 of 45 minutes to lead the Jayhawks to a thrilling, 90-84, overtime victory. That was the night the Jayhawks rolled the newly acquired original rules of basketball onto the court at halftime and also the night that KU overcame a 46-40 halftime deficit to survive a scare from Tyler Ulis and the Wildcats.

Kansas players Devonte Graham, left, Wayne Selden, Frank Mason and Perry Ellis watch during the final seconds of the Jayhawks' 72-40 loss to Kentucky during the Champions Classic on Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2014 at Bankers Life Fieldhouse in Indianapolis.

Kansas players Devonte Graham, left, Wayne Selden, Frank Mason and Perry Ellis watch during the final seconds of the Jayhawks' 72-40 loss to Kentucky during the Champions Classic on Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2014 at Bankers Life Fieldhouse in Indianapolis. by Nick Krug

4 – Nov. 18, 2014 – No. 1 Kentucky drills No. 5 Kansas in Indianapolis in the Champions Classic

KU's second matchup with Kentucky in the early-season showcase also was its most forgettable. The worst loss of the Bill Self era, which prompted the KU coach to crack a joke about how he wished there was vodka in the cups at the postgame podium instead of water, featured a young Kansas squad scoring just 12 points in the second half and shooting 19.6 percent from the floor for the game. Joked Self on Sunday: “After several years of seeing my psychiatrist I've kind of gotten past this, so I'm not going to talk about the past much. But that was a beat-down right from the beginning.”

Kansas guard Josh Jackson (11) comes in for a breakaway dunk during the first half, Saturday, Jan. 28, 2017 at Rupp Arena in Lexington, Kentucky.

Kansas guard Josh Jackson (11) comes in for a breakaway dunk during the first half, Saturday, Jan. 28, 2017 at Rupp Arena in Lexington, Kentucky. by Nick Krug

5 – Jan. 28, 2017 – Second-ranked Kansas travels to Lexington and beats No. 4 Kentucky on its home floor

Back together for the SEC/Big 12 Challenge, this time at Rupp Arena, the Jayhawks and Wildcats again delivered a matchup marked by incredible hype, an amazing atmosphere and elite talent. KU freshman Josh Jackson and future national player of the year Frank Mason III out-dueled Kentucky's talented freshman trio of D'Aaron Fox, Malik Monk and Bam Adebayo, 79-73, coming from 10 down in the first half to emerge victorious. But the thin Kansas lineup also got major contributions from senior Landen Lucas and juniors Svi Mykhailiuk and Devonte' Graham, as KU's starting five played 168 of a possible 200 minutes to grab the win.

KU-Kentucky All-Time Series: (UK leads 22-8)

Dec. 16, 1950 - Kentucky 68, Kansas 39 in Lexington
Dec. 14, 1959 - Kentucky 77, Kansas 72 in Lawrence
Dec. 6, 1969 - Kentucky 115, Kansas 85 in Lexington
Dec. 4, 1971 - Kentucky 79, Kansas 69 in Lawrence
Dec. 23, 1972 - Kentucky 77, Kansas 71 in Lexington
Dec. 3, 1973 - Kansas 71, Kentucky 63 in Lawrence
Dec. 23, 1974 - Kentucky 100, Kansas 63 in Louisville
Dec. 13, 1975 - Kentucky 54, Kansas 48 in Lawrence
Dec. 11, 1976 - Kentucky 90, Kansas 63 in Lexington
Dec. 10, 1977 - Kentucky 73, Kansas 66 in Lawrence
Dec. 9, 1978 - Kentucky 67, Kansas 66 in Lexington
Dec. 12, 1979 - Kentucky 57, Kansas 56 in Lawrence
Dec. 13, 1980 - Kentucky 87, Kansas 73 in Lexington
Dec. 12, 1981 - Kentucky 77, Kansas 74 (OT) in Lawrence
Dec. 29, 1982 - Kentucky 83, Kansas 62 in Louisville
Dec. 10, 1983 - Kentucky 72, Kansas 50 in Lawrence
Dec. 31, 1984 - Kentucky 92, Kansas 89 in Louisville
Dec. 14, 1985 - Kansas 83, Kentucky 66 in Lawrence
Dec. 9, 1989 - Kansas 150, Kentucky 95 in Lawrence
Dec. 8, 1990 - Kentucky 88, Kansas 71 in Lexington
Dec. 1, 1998 - Kentucky 63, Kansas 45 in Chicago (Great Eight Tournament)
March 14, 1999 - Kentucky 92, Kansas 88 (OT) in New Orleans (NCAA Tournament)
Jan. 9, 2005 - Kansas 65, Kentucky 59 in Lexington
Jan. 7, 2006 - Kansas 73, Kentucky 46 in Lawrence
March 18, 2007 - Kansas 88, Kentucky 76 in Chicago (NCAA Tournament)
Nov. 15, 2011 - Kentucky 75, Kansas 65 in New York (Champions Classic)
April 2, 2012 - Kentucky 67, Kansas 59 in New Orleans (NCAA title game)
Nov. 18, 2014 - Kentucky 72, Kansas 40 in Indianapolis (Champions Classic)
Jan. 30, 2016 - Kansas 90, Kentucky 84 (OT) in Lawrence (SEC/Big 12 Challenge)
Jan. 28, 2017 - Kansas 79, Kentucky 73 in Lexington (SEC/Big 12 Challenge)

Reply 23 comments from Bryce Landon Carsonc30 John Smith Rob Stewart Dirk Medema Tony Bandle Gary McCullough Jayhawkinaustin Marcus  Balzer Jim Stauffer and 7 others

Postgame Report Card: Kansas 92, Tennessee State 56

Kansas guard Lagerald Vick (2) floats in for a dunk during the first half on Friday, Nov. 10, 2017 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas guard Lagerald Vick (2) floats in for a dunk during the first half on Friday, Nov. 10, 2017 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

Quick grades for five aspects of KU’s 92-56 season-opening victory over Tennessee State at Allen Fieldhouse.

Offense: A

It would’ve been an A+ if not for the 20 turnovers. The Jayhawks shot 60 percent from the floor, dished 23 assists on 36 field goals, knocked in 12 of 28 3-pointers and had six players reach double figures. Efficient and flat-out dangerous from start to finish.

Defense: A

Tennessee State was overmatched from the jump and the Jayhawks never let up. KU swiped eight steals, forced 15 turnovers and limited the Tigers to 32.8 percent shooting, a number that actually went down in the second half even though the game evened out. Kansas also out-rebounded TSU 45-23, including a 35-8 mark on the defensive end.

Frontcourt: B-

With just two forwards playing in the game thanks to Billy Preston’s one-game suspension, KU got solid but unspectacular showings from Mitch Lightfoot and Udoka Azubuike. The two combined for 19 points and 11 rebounds on 8-of-11 shooting, but also turned it over six times.

Backcourt: A

Devonte’ Graham threatened to record a triple-double, Lagerald Vick scored anywhere and everywhere he wanted and Malik Newman and Svi Mykhailiuk combined to knock down 5 of 10 3-point shots. And then there was freshman Marcus Garrett, who was a surprise starter and recorded a double-double in 29 minutes.

Bench: B-

Newman and Lightfoot, along with walk-ons Clay Young and Chris Teahan were the Kansas bench in this one and they combined to shoot 8-of-17 from the floor for 21 points and nine turnovers. Outside of his four turnovers, Newman showed the kind of effort and intensity Self was searching for. And Lightfoot, when he played within himself, was the solid presence KU needs him to be. When he didn’t, he turned it over four times.

Reply 2 comments from Matt Tait Dirk Medema

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