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Self Madness 2020: Round 2 Matchups

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Self Madness 2020

Self Madness 2020 by Matt Tait

Somewhat predictably, there were no upsets in Round 1 of our Self Madness 2020 bracket, and only one of the fictitious games was even close.

That was the 6-11 matchup between the 2010-11 team and the 2015-16 team.

The sixth-seeded 2010-11 team, starring the junior set of Morris twins and Tyshawn Taylor, knocked off the Perry Ellis-led 2015-16 team in by far the closest vote of the first round.

The 2010-11 team received 53.5% of the vote in its matchup with junior Frank Mason and sophomore Devonte’ Graham. Evidently the youth of those two future All-Americans was just enough to keep KU fans from advancing them in the bracket.

In all, Round 1 featured more than 3,100 votes and some incredibly lopsided results.

Three of the eight victories came with the winning team receiving 92% of the vote or better, including the 2007-08 team’s rout of 2014-15, 97.6% to 2.4%.

Amazingly, 10 people voted for the 2014-15 squad over the national champs, but we have no way of finding their identity to properly shame them.

The other two runaway wins belonged to the 2009-10 squad, which won 92.1% to 7.9% over 2004-05, and the 2019-20 team’s 95.9% to 4.1% win over the 2005-06 team.

Those were just the biggest blowouts.

Three other matchups featured a winning squad with at least 82% of the vote, as the 2017-18 Final Four team knocked off the 2008-09 team 82.7%-17.3%, the 2011-12 Final Four team topped the 2013-14 team 86%-14% and the Frank Mason-led 2016-17 team knocked off the 2012-13 team 85.5% to 14.5%.

The only matchup that wasn’t either super close or a complete rout was the 2006-07 squad’s 69.2% to 30.8% win over Bill Self’s first Kansas team from 2003-04.

Things should start to get a little more interesting from here on out. So check out the Round 2 matchups here and make your voice heard in the bracket below them.

Voting for Round 2 runs through Tuesday night. And don’t forget to register for the $500 prize courtesy of Truity Credit Union if you haven’t already.

If you already registered in Round 1, you don’t need to do it again to be entered in the drawing.

On to the quarterfinals!

1. 2007-08 • 37-3

The deepest and most balanced team Self has had at KU not only won six straight games in the 2008 NCAA Tournament to give Self his first title, but it also was the last team standing at the only Final Four to date that featured all four No. 1 seeds. Led by four players in double figures in scoring — Brandon Rush (13.3), Mario Chalmers (12.8), Darrell Arthur (12.8), Darnell Jackson (11.2) — and a fifth who was right there in sophomore Sherron Collins (9.3), the 2007-08 Jayhawks had terrific talent, ideal chemistry and the players who filled their roles to perfection. After rolling to 20 wins to open the season, the Jayhawks won the Big 12 regular season crown, the Big 12 tournament title and reached the Final Four by rolling past Portland State and UNLV in Omaha, Neb., and Villanova and a Steph-Curry-led Davidson team in Detroit. From there, Kansas clobbered Roy Williams and North Carolina and knocked off John Calipari’s Memphis Tigers, 75-68 in overtime, after Chalmers’ miracle shot saved KU in regulation.

vs.

No. 8 • 2006-07 • 33-5

This team played a key part in the progression of Kansas becoming a national champion again. With sophomore Julian Wright in the lineup as the team’s third leading scorer (12 points per game) the Jayhawks lost just four times all season heading into the NCAA Tournament. Three of the four losses were on the road and the fourth was the thrilling, Texas A&M/Acie Law IV game at Allen Fieldhouse. Rush (13.5) and Chalmers (11.5) led the team in scoring and Arthur (9.8) and Collins (9.3) learned valuable lessons about playing at the college level — and for Self — that served them well in KU’s pursuit of the title a year later. After a 14-2 run through the Big 12, KU won the Big 12 tournament crown with a classic, overtime win over Texas in Oklahoma City and entered the tournament as a No. 1 seed. The Jayhawks rolled over Niagara in Round 1 and dumped Kentucky in Round 2 before surviving a physical war with Southern Illinois in the Sweet 16. That set up an Elite Eight showdown with UCLA and many Kansas fans remain bitter that the Bruins, seeded second, wound up with the advantage of facing top-seeded KU in San Jose instead of somewhere closer to Kansas. KU lost that game, 68-55 — delivering UCLA the second of three consecutive trips to the Final Four under Ben Howland — and finished the season one step shy of reaching the Final Four for the first time since Roy Williams left in 2003.

NO. 1 vs. NO. 8 MATCHUP

Starting Five

2007-08

Russell Robinson, Sr.

Mario Chalmers, Jr.

Brandon Rush, Jr.

Darrell Arthur, Soph.

Darnell Jackson, Sr.

2006-07

Russell Robinson, Sr.

Mario Chalmers, Jr.

Brandon Rush, Jr.

Julian Wright, Soph.

Sasha Kaun, Jr.

Top Reserves

2007-08

Sherron Collins, Soph.

Sasha Kaun, Sr.

Cole Aldrich, Fr.

2006-07

Sherron Collins, Soph.

Darrell Arthur, Fr.

Sherron Collins, Fr.

KenPom.com Comparison

2007-08

Final Ranking: No. 1

Offensive Efficiency: 2nd

Defensive Efficiency: 1st

Strength of Schedule: 14th

KenPom.com Comparison

2006-07

Final Ranking: No. 5

Offensive Efficiency: 29th

Defensive Efficiency: 1st

Strength of Schedule: 59th

Statistical Comparison

2007-08

Points Per Game: 80.5 (13th)

Points Allowed Per Game: 61.5 (21st)

FG Percentage: 50.8 (2nd)

3-point Percentage: 39.7 (15th)

Rebounding Margin: +7.9

2006-07

Points Per Game: 78.4 (20th)

Points Allowed Per Game: 61.7 (29th)

FG Percentage: 49.4 (9th)

3-point Percentage: 39.6 (21st)

Rebounding Margin: +6.7


No. 4 • 2011-12 • 32-7

Who could ever forget Thomas Robinson’s monster junior season, filled with double-doubles (he averaged 17.7 points and 11.8 rebounds per game) and wild finishes? Or his running mate, Tyshawn Taylor (16.6 ppg), whose speed, toughness and play-making ability helped lead this team all the way to the national title game against Kentucky in New Orleans. That dynamic duo took the Jayhawks on a wild ride through the NCAA Tournament, that featured KU barely surviving Round 2 against Purdue and intense battles with North Carolina State, North Carolina and Ohio State in the three rounds that followed. Joined in the starting lineup by Elijah Johnson, Travis Releford and swat king Jeff Withey, these Jayhawks were one of Self’s thinnest teams — sharp-shooter Conner Teahan and electric forward Kevin Young were the only other two who played consistent minutes — but also one of the toughest. Never was that more evident than in the final Border War game with Missouri at Allen Fieldhouse, where Kansas came back from 19 points down to send off their rival to the SEC in dramatic fashion late in the season.

vs.

No. 5 • 2009-10 • 33-3

The No. 1 overall seed entering the 2010 NCAA Tournament was loaded with talent, experience, depth, versatility and saddled with just two losses — at Tennessee and at Oklahoma State. Some future stars, i.e. Taylor and Marcus Morris, were just getting started and a pair of upperclassmen named Sherron Collins and Cole Aldrich led this team on both offense and defense. Kansas finished 15-1 in Big 12 play and rolled through the Big 12 tournament by an average margin of victory of 11 points per game. Collins led the team at 15.5 points per game and freshman Xavier Henry, a smooth 6-foot-6 lefty expected to be KU’s latest one-and-done phenom averaged 13.4 points per game. These Jayhawks finished the season ranked in the Top 8 in both offensive and defensive efficiency, but ran into upset-minded Northern Iowa and encountered a much tougher second-round showdown than anyone expected. UNI guard Ali Farokhmanesh delivered the dagger 3-pointer with 34 seconds to play in the 69-67 KU loss.

NO. 4 vs. NO. 5 MATCHUP

Starting Five

2011-12

Tyshawn Taylor, Sr.

Elijah Johnson, Jr.

Travis Releford, Jr.

Thomas Robinson, Jr.

Jeff Withey, Jr.

2009-10

Sherron Collins, Sr.

Tyshawn Taylor, Soph.

Xavier Henry, Fr.

Marcus Morris, Soph.

Cole Aldrich, Jr.

Top Reserves

2011-12

Conner Teahan, Sr.

Kevin Young, Jr.

Justin Wesley, Soph.

2009-10

Markieff Morris, Soph.

Brady Morningstar, Jr.

Tyrel Reed, Jr.

KenPom.com Comparison

2011-12

Final Ranking: No. 4

Offensive Efficiency: 23rd

Defensive Efficiency: 3rd

Strength of Schedule: 1st

2009-10

Final Ranking: No. 5

Offensive Efficiency: 29th

Defensive Efficiency: 1st

Strength of Schedule: 59th

Statistical Comparison

2011-12

Points Per Game: 73.5 (48th)

Points Allowed Per Game: 61.7 (44th)

FG Percentage: 47.2 (31st)

3-point Percentage: 34.5 (157th)

Rebounding Margin: +2.9

2009-10

Points Per Game: 81.6 (5th)

Points Allowed Per Game: 64.2 (64th)

FG Percentage: 48.9 (8th)

3-point Percentage: 40.4 (7th)

Rebounding Margin: +6.9


No. 3 • 2017-18 • 31-8

Arguably the best offensive team Self has ever coached at KU, the 2017-18 Jayhawks embraced all the aesthetically captivating aspects of living that four-guard life. KU surrounded 7-foot sophomore center Udoka Azubuike (13 points per game, 77% field goal percentage) with sharpshooting senior guards Devonte’ Graham (17.3 points, 40.6% on 3-pointers) and Svi Mykhailiuk (14.6 points, 44.4% 3-pointers), as well as Malik Newman (14.2 points, 41.5% 3-pointers) and Lagerald Vick (12.1 points, 37.3% 3-pointers). With a virtually unstoppable center in Azubuike, and always-confident floor-stretching guards around him, KU shot 49.2% from the floor overall, went 391-for-974 on 3-pointers (40.1%) and put up 81.4 points per game en route to the program’s 14th straight Big 12 title and a run to the Final Four. A No. 1 seed in the Midwest in 2018, the Jayhawks, led by consensus All-American Graham, went through Penn, Seton Hall, Clemson and Duke before meeting their match against eventual champion Villanova in San Antonio.

vs.

No. 6 • 2010-11 • 33-5

It was the year of The Morrii, and with twin bigs Marcus and Markieff Morris scoring at all three levels, the Jayhawks rolled much of the season, outscoring opponents by an average of 16.5 points per game. KU entered the NCAA Tournament on an eight-game winning streak, and having suffered only two losses the entire season. The “Family Over Everything” mantra of Marcus (17.2 points per game, 7.6 rebounds) and Markieff (13.6 points, 8.3 rebounds, 42.4% 3-point shooting) seemed to permeate the balanced roster, with guards Tyshawn Taylor, Tyrel Reed, Brady Morningstar and Josh Selby serving as the supporting cast. KU went into the Big Dance as a No. 1 seed in the Southwest region, and after breezing past Boston and Illinois in the opening weekend, the Jayhawks saw the rest of the bracket open up, as they were joined in the Sweet 16 by double-digit seeds Richmond (12), VCU (11) and Florida State (10). Kansas beat Richmond by 20 only to go cold in the Elite Eight (2-for-21 from 3-point range) and lose to VCU, 71-61.

NO. 3 vs. NO. 6 MATCHUP

Starting Five

2017-18

Devonte’ Graham, Sr.

Malik Newman, Soph.

Lagerald Vick, Jr.

Svi Mykhailiuk, Sr.

Udoka Azubuike, Soph.

2010-11

Tyshawn Taylor, Jr.

Tyrel Reed, Sr.

Brady Morningstar, Sr.

Marcus Morris, Jr.

Markieff Morris, Jr.

Top Reserves

2017-18

Marcus Garrett, Fr.

Mitch Lightfoot, Soph.

Silvio De Sousa, Fr.

2010-11

Josh Selby, Fr.

Thomas Robinson, Soph.

Mario Little, Sr.

Elijah Johnson, Soph.

Travis Releford, Soph.

2017-18

Final Ranking: No. 9

Offensive Efficiency: 5th

Defensive Efficiency: 47th

Strength of Schedule: 2nd

2010-11

Final Ranking: No. 3

Offensive Efficiency: 6th

Defensive Efficiency: 6th

Strength of Schedule: 32nd

Statistical Comparison

2017-18

Points Per Game: 81.4 (29th)

Points Allowed Per Game: 71.9 (160th)

FG Percentage: 49.2 (12th)

3-point Percentage: 40.1 (11th)

Rebounding Margin: +0.4

2010-11

Points Per Game: 73.5 (48th)

Points Allowed Per Game: 61.7 (44th)

FG Percentage: 47.2 (31st)

3-point Percentage: 34.5 (157th)

Rebounding Margin: +2.9


No. 2 • 2019-20 • 28-3

There’s no telling if this year’s team would have brought a banner back to Allen Fieldhouse or not, but Self, along with dozens of national college basketball analysts, have said they thought this group had as good a shot as anybody to win it all. This group featured a trio of difference makers — on both ends of the floor — and was backed by a solid supporting cast that knew its role and knew how and when to play it. Big 12 Player of the Year and double-double machine Udoka Azubuike (13.7 points, 10.5 rebounds) was the biggest problem. Big 12 Defensive Player of the Year Marcus Garrett was the glue that held everything together on both ends of the court. And prolific point guard Devon Dotson led the Big 12 in scoring (18.1 ppg) and earned all-Big 12 and All-American honors from several outlets. A year after watching the Big 12 title streak come to an end, the Jayhawks climbed back on top of the conference with the best record in the history of the Big 12 (17-1) and ended the season on a 16-game winning streak.

vs.

No. 7 • 2016-17 • 31-5

This offensive juggernaut was led by national player of the year point guard Frank Mason III (20.9 points per game) and a supporting cast that included future All-American Devonte’ Graham (13.4 ppg) and No. 4 overall draft pick Josh Jackson (16.3). After rolling to another Big 12 title with a 16-2 mark, the Jayahwks appeared to be well on their way to reaching another Final Four, and perhaps more, when the postseason arrived. After delivering three of the most lopsided wins of the tournament over UC Davis (100-62), Michigan State (90-70) and Purdue (98-66) KU was upset by Oregon, in Kansas City, Mo., of all places. Lagerald Vick’s 360 dunk in the win over Purdue is one of the lasting images of the season that also featured big man Landen Lucas serving as a defensive anchor and rebounding force down low.

NO. 2 vs. NO. 7 MATCHUP

Starting Five

2019-20

Devon Dotson, Soph.

Isaiah Moss, Sr.

Ochai Agbaji, Soph.

Marcus Garrett, Jr.

Udoka Azubuike, Sr.

2016-17

Frank Mason III, Sr.

Devonte’ Graham, Jr.

Josh Jackson, Fr.

Svi Mykhailiuk, Jr.

Landen Lucas, Sr.

Top Reserves

2019-20

David McCormack, Soph.

Christian Braun, Fr.

Tristan Enaruna, Fr.

2016-17

Perry Ellis, Fr.

Naadir Tharpe, Soph.

Jamari Traylor, Fr.

Andrew White III, Jr.

KenPom.com Comparison

2019-20

Final Ranking: No. 1

Offensive Efficiency: 8th

Defensive Efficiency: 2nd

Strength of Schedule: 2nd

2016-17

Final Ranking: No. 6

Offensive Efficiency: 5th

Defensive Efficiency: 24th

Strength of Schedule: 8th

Statistical Comparison

2019-20

Points Per Game: 74.6 (88th)

Points Allowed Per Game: 60.7 (10th)

FG Percentage: 48.4 (9th)

3-point Percentage: 34.4 (117th)

Rebounding Margin: +6.6

2016-17

Points Per Game: 83.2 (14th)

Points Allowed Per Game: 71.9 (172nd)

FG Percentage: 48.8 (12th)

3-point Percentage: 40.4 (6th)

Rebounding Margin: +4.4

Comments

Mallory Briggans 2 months ago

Matt i want to applaud you for staying engaged in the process. The world is on pause and many have checked out on the season and anything Jayhawks. Well Im still voting in Self Madeness Alot of strong teams .......I will vote again tomorrow . Thanks again Matt

Matt Tait 2 months ago

Thanks for the kind words, Mallory. Glad you're enjoying it!

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