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Posts tagged with Udoka Azubuike

Marcus Garrett’s defensive versatility makes it easy for KU to shift to 4-guard lineup

Kansas guard Marcus Garrett (0) moves to the bucket past Wofford center Matthew Pegram (50) during the second half on Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2018 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas guard Marcus Garrett (0) moves to the bucket past Wofford center Matthew Pegram (50) during the second half on Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2018 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

Your best post player goes down. Time for another to step up, right?

Not for this Kansas basketball team.

The absence of center Udoka Azubuike, no matter how long the 7-footer’s right ankle sprain keeps him out of the lineup, doesn’t necessarily mean more minutes for the frontcourt reserves who have been backing him up.

Head coach Bill Self loved the talents of Azubuike and Dedric Lawson too much to not go big and play them together. But now that his starting center is out, Self’s ready to adapt by reviving the four-guard look that worked so well for the Jayhawks the past couple of seasons.

While Lawson, a 6-foot-9 redshirt junior, isn’t the type of low-post player Azubuike is, Self isn’t going to ask his versatile forward, who leads the No. 2 Jayhawks in scoring (19 points per game), rebounds (10.7) and assists (3.1) to try to be someone he’s not. And Self has no intention of forcing junior Mitch Lightfoot or freshman David McCormack into the lineup as a pseudo-Dok just because that’s the style KU played during its 7-0 start.

The offense will start running through Lawson even more now, as guards Devon Dotson, Quentin Grimes, Lagerald Vick and Marcus Garrett play around him. If Lawson (32.7 minutes a game) needs a breather, then Self will turn to either Lightfoot (6.6 minutes) or McCormack (4.5 minutes) a little more than he has previously.

But even when KU is faced with defending a team that plays two bigs together, Self doesn’t think that will force him to match it. Garrett, a 6-5 sophomore guard, proved earlier this week in KU’s 72-47 victory over Wofford he can more than hold his own as the 4-man, the role occupied in recent four-guard lineups by Svi Mykhailiuk and Josh Jackson.

“We defended them so much better with Marcus on their big guy,” Self said of one factor that convinced KU’s coaching staff to start Garrett instead of another big in Azubuike’s spot. “I have confidence in Marcus defending the 4-man. Now we may need to trap the post or do some things like that. But I think that’s good for us.”

Ask a guard about the in-season modification to the Jayhawks’ style and he’ll think about what it will do for the offense.

“That gives us a bunch of freedom,” Grimes said of Garrett joining the starting lineup. “Really whoever gets (the ball on a defensive stop), all five can essentially bring it. So I think it’s definitely going to help us out for sure.”

Grimes envisions not only he and Vick catching more lobs but also he and Garrett throwing more of them.

“I think it’ll be really fun,” Grimes said.

Self, though, isn’t moving to a four-guard lineup because he’s concerned about anyone’s enjoyment or entertainment. He’s backing away from a two-big approach because Garrett’s defensive versatility makes it an easy decision.

“He’s got good size, he’s got long arms,” Self began, when asked how Garrett is able to guard both perimeter and post players. “But he is very, very smart. As far as IQ and understanding the game on the defensive side, he’s right up there with the best that we’ve ever had. And he’s tough. And he’s strong. And he pays attention to scouting reports. So he knows when to show, when not to show, when to front. … He just does a better job, I’d say, than the majority of college players out there early in his career, because he does have a great feel defensively.”

And, believe it or not, Self and his staff have long thought this year’s KU team has a chance to become “really good” defensively. Self said Thursday that may even end up becoming this group’s identity.

For much of the first six games, that didn’t look to be the case. But Self saw during Tuesday’s win over Wofford glimpses of speed and length and activity from his guards that he and his assistants first witnessed during both the summer and fall.

He’s not ready to call KU a good defensive team yet. Self remembers how his team “stunk” on that end of the floor against Stanford just five days ago. But he has observed both improvement and potential.

If that’s the vision, it may be difficult for either Lightfoot or McCormack to play huge minutes, even if they play well. KJ Lawson and Charlie Moore can step into the four-guard lineup around Dedric Lawson as needed. And Lightfoot and McCormack can sub in and still find ways to impact the game.

“We’re similar but still different,” the 6-10 McCormack said of what he and the 6-8 Lightfoot bring. “We’re both high intensity, both hustle players, both rebounders. There’s some aspects that Mitch does that I don’t. Like Mitch might step out and he’ll shoot a 3-pointer every now and then — something I may not do,” McCormack added. “Me, I’m more back to the basket. He may want to face up. So there are some differences, but there are some similarities at the same time.”

McCormack has the build and McDonald’s All-American pedigree to potentially perform his way into more playing time. And Lightfoot remains a strong help-side rim protector, as well as the best Jayhawk at taking charges.

But if neither ends up seeing a huge uptick in minutes while Azubuike is out, you won’t see either of them sulking. They’re two high character teammates, too, who will do all they can to contribute in a four-guard lineup that isn’t built to feature them.

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Postgame Report Card: Kansas 84, Vermont 68

Kansas guard Lagerald Vick (24) puts up a three over Vermont guard Ernie Duncan (20) during the first half, Monday, Nov. 12, 2018 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas guard Lagerald Vick (24) puts up a three over Vermont guard Ernie Duncan (20) during the first half, Monday, Nov. 12, 2018 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

Quick grades for five aspects of the Kansas basketball team’s 84-68 win over Vermont Monday night at Allen Fieldhouse.

Offense: B-

For most of the Jayhawks’ home opener, only two players found ways to assert themselves on offense. And, really, it was more The Lagerald Vick Show, with Udoka Azubuike co-starring than a case of equal billing.

Vick, a 6-foot-5 senior guard, was the only offense the Jayhawks had for much of the opening minutes, with 13 of KU’s first 20 points — and the No. 2 team in the country trailing, 26-20.

He went on to nail all eight of his attempts from behind the arc and lead Kansas with a career-best 32 points. You could tell he was cooking early, when he buried his fourth with a little one-on-one crossover and pull-up on the left wing after a half-court set produced nothing better.

The only other approach working for KU (to varying degrees of success) was force-feeding Azubuike inside, usually with entry passes over the top, and letting the 7-footer power through defenders for dunks, layups and shots near the rim. The massive junior hit 10 of 17 from the floor for 23 points and brought in 11 rebounds

Two first-half fouls meant Dedric Lawson only played seven minutes before the break and his slow start and off night — 0 points, seven rebounds — served as a reminder of how vital the junior forward will be for KU’s offense.

With little offensive support for Vick and Azubuike, KU couldn’t put away Vermont (1-1) until the final minutes.

Defense: B-

In the opening minutes, KU ran into trouble contesting Ernie Duncan and Stef Smith (both 2-for-2) from beyond the arc, leading to a 14-8 deficit before the first media timeout.

Vermont improved its lead to 23-17 near the midway mark of the first half on Smith’s third 3-pointer and led by as many as eight.

Azubuike, with regularity in the first half, struggled to recover when involved in ball screens, leading to quality looks both inside and out for the Catamounts.

KU eventually adjusted and/or settled in enough to keep Vermont from giving the Jayhawks a real scare, though. The Catamounts shot 41 percent form the floor and didn’t knock in enough 3-pointers (9 of 26) to set up a potential upset.

Frontcourt: C

Outside of Azubuike’s double-double and some rebounds from Dedric Lawson, the bigs weren’t effective and in some cases, were just not playable, given Vermont’s reliance on a smaller lineup.

Backcourt: B-

Freshman Quentin Grimes, with a steady floor game and 10 assists to go with his 10 points, gave Vick a little help. But Devon Dotson (seven points, six rebounds) wasn’t quite as effective.

Bench: C

Sophomore guards Charlie Moore (seven points, two assists in 21 minutes) and Marcus Garrett (four points, five rebounds and three assists in 26 minutes) were the only substitutes Bill Self trusted on this night.

Reply 4 comments from Surrealku Dirk Medema Dale Rogers

2019 NBA mock drafts project Quentin Grimes as likely lottery pick

University of Kansas freshman guard Quentin Grimes and basketball coach Bill Self discuss their recent involvement with USA Basketball during a press conference on June 19, 2018, inside Allen Fieldhouse.

University of Kansas freshman guard Quentin Grimes and basketball coach Bill Self discuss their recent involvement with USA Basketball during a press conference on June 19, 2018, inside Allen Fieldhouse. by Benton Smith

Considering the 2018 draft concluded just a week ago, it’s still difficult to picture second-round picks Devonte’ Graham and Svi Mykhailiuk playing in their respective new NBA uniforms instead of the University of Kansas jerseys and shorts they sported every time they hit the court the past four years.

So perhaps now is as good a time as any to start preparing yourself for the idea of incoming freshman Quentin Grimes swapping his KU gear for an NBA fit next summer.

A 6-foot-5 combo guard from The Woodlands, Texas, Grimes, of course, hasn’t declared himself a one-and-done talent yet.

But all early indications point toward him becoming a lottery pick in 2019.

Twelve months out form the next NBA Draft, mock projections from multiple outlets list Grimes, coming off an MVP performance at the FIBA Americas U18 Championship, as a top-10 prospect.

According to six different mock drafts, Grimes’ current value ranks somewhere between the fourth- and 19th-best player to potentially be available, and most have him coming off the board before the 10th pick:

ESPN - No. 6

Sports Illustrated - No. 7

• CBS Sports - No. 4

NBC Sports - No. 5

Bleacher Report - No. 19

SB Nation - No. 10

According to SI’s Jeremy Woo, Grimes checks “all the boxes” for a combo guard.

“Grimes has a nice mix of positional size, ball-handling ability and passing feel and is ready for the college level,” Woo wrote. “He has impressive coordination for his size and finishes pretty well around the rim. He stands to be more aggressive defending and imposing his will on the game in all facets, and appears to need the ball in his hands to thrive right now. His 3-point shot is also a little shaky at times. As long as Grimes rises to the occasion at Kansas, the lottery should be within reach.”

That breakdown falls in line with what KU coach Bill Self said about the freshman guard, upon returning to Lawrence from their gold-medal trip to Canada, in June. The 18-year-old Grimes hasn’t yet played a game for the Jayhawks and Self already called him “probably as complete a guard as we’ve ever had.”

At this point, though, no other Jayhawks project as first-round prospects for 2019.

While not every mock draft includes a second-round forecast, ESPN classified junior-to-be Udoka Azubuike, who dipped his large toes into the NBA waters this past spring, as the No. 48 potential draftee.

SI doesn’t include KU’s 7-foot center on its list, but does give 6-9 forward Dedric Lawson a spot near the middle of the second round, at No. 42.

“While not an exceptional athlete, Lawson has been highly productive on both ends of the glass and around the basket,” Woo wrote of the transfer from Memphis, who will make his KU debut this coming season, “and has shown inconsistent but functional set shooting touch from outside. He could be in position for a big year as part of what’s essentially a brand new Jayhawks rotation, and should be able to rejuvenate his draft stock in the process.”

Grimes, Azubuike and Lawson all will have plenty of opportunities to improve — or hurt — their stock in the months ahead, and it shouldn’t surprise anybody if all three ultimately decide to enter the drat next year.

KU’s 2018-19 roster might not have any seniors on it, but, as usual, you should count on the best Jayhawks exploring their NBA options and possibly deciding to leave early.

Reply 3 comments from Karen Mansfield-Stewart Clarence Glasse Gerry Butler

5 stats that popped in KU’s Final Four loss to Villanova

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) glances at the scoreboard during a timeout in the second half, Saturday, March 31, 2018 at the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas.

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) glances at the scoreboard during a timeout in the second half, Saturday, March 31, 2018 at the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas. by Nick Krug

San Antonio — When Kansas couldn’t come up with any solutions for Villanova’s bombs-away offensive attack Saturday night at The Alamodome, an ultimately successful season came to a close two victories shy of a national title and enduring glory.

The Jayhawks’ faulty 3-point defense proved costly in a 95-79 defeat. Still, plenty of other subplots shaped the result, sending Villanova to the NCAA Tournament championship game and KU back to Lawrence.

Here are five statistics that stood out — four that led to a Final Four loss and one a glimmer of promise for next year — in the 39th and final game of another memorable Kansas basketball season.

Not much offensive flow

For all the defensive problems Kansas encountered against Villanova, the offense didn’t exactly help the Jayhawks’ chances of keeping up, either.

Over the course of 40 minutes, KU made 28 field goals in the national semifinal, and only 8 of those were set up by an assist.

The Wildcats’ well-positioned help defense made it difficult for even All-American senior point guard Devonte’ Graham to drive, force help and kick the ball out for open shots. Instead, Graham had to take on a bulk of the scoring load (23 points) without making his typical impact as a facilitator.

Kansas went nearly 10 full minutes into the game without an assist, and trailed by 14 by the time Graham passed to Lagerald Vick for the team’s first.

In the final game of his distinguished Kansas career, the senior from Raleigh, N.C., only distributed 3 assists, a season low for Graham, who entered the Final Four averaging 7.3 per game.

His friend and fellow senior, Svi Mykhailiuk, also contributed 3 assists. Sophomore Malik Newman and freshman Marcus Garrett had 1 apiece.

The previous low for assists in a game for Kansas this season was 10, in a January home loss to Texas Tech.

Villanova assisted on 20 of its 36 field goals.

Azubuike ineffective

Kansas guard Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk (10) gives Kansas center Udoka Azubuike (35) a slap on the chest as Azubuike checks out during the first half, Saturday, March 31, 2018 at the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas.

Kansas guard Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk (10) gives Kansas center Udoka Azubuike (35) a slap on the chest as Azubuike checks out during the first half, Saturday, March 31, 2018 at the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas. by Nick Krug

In order to have a chance to beat Villanova — one of the best offensive teams in the country, if not the best — Kansas needed to maximize the impact of its starting center.

Based on measurements alone, it seemed 7-foot, 280-pound Udoka Azubuike might be too much for the Wildcats’ bigs — Omari Spellman, Eric Paschall and Dhamir Cosby-Roundtree all are listed at 6-9 or smaller — to handle in the paint.

Even though Azubuike was close to unstoppable when he got the ball in his hands in the paint, those opportunities rarely presented themselves thanks to Villanova’s active, denying and helping defense. As usual, Azubuike shot a high percentage, making 4 of 6 attempts. But Villanova made sure a potential mismatch inside didn’t turn into a disaster. KU’s 7-footer finished with 8 points in 26 minutes.

Azubuike played more minutes against Villanova than he had since Feb. 24 against Texas Tech. But he never dominated inside enough to force Villanova defenders to leave KU’s skilled 3-point shooters on the perimeter. When the Wildcats did have to collapse, their rotations were too sound to be harmed.

No stopping Paschall

Villanova forward Eric Paschall (4) delivers a dunk before Kansas guard Lagerald Vick (2) during the first half, Saturday, March 31, 2018 at the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas.

Villanova forward Eric Paschall (4) delivers a dunk before Kansas guard Lagerald Vick (2) during the first half, Saturday, March 31, 2018 at the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas. by Nick Krug

The Villanova starter who entered the Final Four with relatively little buzz quickly became one of the keys to the Wildcats’ unstoppable offense.

Junior forward Eric Paschall, who made 31 3-pointers all season before arriving at The Alamodome, drained 4 of 5 from outside and didn’t miss a single attempt inside the arc en route to a 10-for-11 shooting night and a game-high 24 points.

When Paschall, once a protege of KU assistant Fred Quartlebaum, wasn’t knocking down 3-pointers, his powerful takes inside provided Villanova with three dunks, a layup and two more buckets.

The versatile junior transfer, playing in his first Final Four game after sitting out in 2016, easily bested previous career highs of 19 points and 8 field goals made.

A threat to shoot from outside or drive and finish in the paint, Paschall more than made up for a relatively subpar night for All-Big East forward Mikal Bridges (4-for-8 shooting, 10 points).

The Jayhawks’ defense couldn’t account for every Villanova player on the floor because the Wildcats’ lineups were so multi-dimensional. As a result, Paschall had as much to do with Villanova running away from KU as anyone.

Slllooowww start

Kansas guard Malik Newman (14) pulls up for a shot against Villanova guard Donte DiVincenzo (10) during the first half, Saturday, March 31, 2018 at the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas.

Kansas guard Malik Newman (14) pulls up for a shot against Villanova guard Donte DiVincenzo (10) during the first half, Saturday, March 31, 2018 at the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas. by Nick Krug

The antithesis of Villanova’s offense in the opening minutes of the national semifinal, the Jayhawks couldn’t settle in and get comfortable the way their opponents did.

Kansas took a short-lived lead at 2-0 on the opening possession. However, what followed set the stage for the Wildcats’ 16-point dismantling of KU in the Jayhawks’ second-largest defeat of the year (they lost by 18 at Oklahoma State to close the regular season).

Kansas missed 9 of its next 11 shots after Azubuike’s early score, and turned the ball over five times in the first 6:49 of play.

Before the Jayhawks could regroup offensively, their fifth giveaway led to — what else — a Villanova 3-pointer, and an 18-point deficit. All before KU made its fourth basket of the game.

Some promise for De Sousa’s future

Villanova guard Mikal Bridges (25) and Villanova forward Omari Spellman (14) get a rebound from Kansas forward Silvio De Sousa (22) during the second half, Saturday, March 31, 2018 at the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas.

Villanova guard Mikal Bridges (25) and Villanova forward Omari Spellman (14) get a rebound from Kansas forward Silvio De Sousa (22) during the second half, Saturday, March 31, 2018 at the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas. by Nick Krug

Not every stat that jumps off the box score in a loss has to come with negative connotations.

One of the seldom KU bright spots came in the activity of a freshman reserve who could be a massive part of coach Bill Self’s future plans.

Whether by coincidence or as a direct result of his presence, the Jayhawks finally settled down and got to see the ball go through the net every once in a while once backup big Silvio De Sousa checked into the game.

Making just his 20th appearance for Kansas after arriving mid-season as an early prep graduate, De Sousa relieved Azubuike and began hitting the offensive glass and providing Kansas with some life.

In just six first-half minutes, De Sousa grabbed five offensive rebounds and scored 7 points, going 2 for 3 from the floor and making 3 of 4 free throws.

De Sousa tipped in his own miss, as well as one by Graham, as the 6-foot-9 forward from Angola scored all 7 of KU’s second-chance points in the first half.

By the end of the night, De Sousa didn’t score another basket, but finished with seven points and seven boards (six offensive) in just 10 minutes of action.

De Sousa grew much more comfortable in the past several weeks after an anticipated adjustment period for his first semester at Kansas. His confidence and effectiveness will only grow in the months ahead.

When the big man’s sophomore season begins this coming November, he will have Final Four experience, instead of no college basketball points of reference whatsoever.

Reply 4 comments from Shannon Gustafson Dirk Medema Robert  Brock Pius Waldman

Duke’s evolving 2-3 zone expected to be a ‘huge challenge’ for Kansas

Duke guard Grayson Allen (3) and Duke guard Trevon Duval (1) pressure Syracuse guard Frank Howard (23) during the second half, Friday, March 23, 2018 at CenturyLink Center in Omaha, Neb.

Duke guard Grayson Allen (3) and Duke guard Trevon Duval (1) pressure Syracuse guard Frank Howard (23) during the second half, Friday, March 23, 2018 at CenturyLink Center in Omaha, Neb. by Nick Krug

Omaha, Neb. — The proverbial “Road to the Final Four” hasn’t been kind to Kansas the past two years, particularly the hazard known as the Elite Eight.

In order to move past the regional final stage of the NCAA Tournament, the Jayhawks will first have to navigate through — or shoot over — the active arms of Duke’s half-court zone defense.

“They’re so long,” KU center Udoka Azubuike said of the Blue Devils, and how they discourage passes and effectively defend inside and out. “It’s something new. It’s going to be a huge challenge because of their size.”

The most imposing members of the Blue Devils’ defense are freshman bigs Wendell Carter Jr. (6-foot-10, 259 pounds) and Marvin Bagley III (6-11, 234). Carter said Duke (29-7) evolved from a standard 2-3 zone, once head coach Mike Krzyzewski implemented it as a primary strategy in early February.

At times it more closely resembles a 4-1, with four players surrounding the arc and Carter in the paint, protecting the basket.

“As we started playing great shooting teams, we had to stay high to make sure we recover all parts of the perimeter,” Carter said. “I just go in there and do my best to protect the rim.”

Against the Midwest’s No. 1 seed, Kansas (30-7), Duke likely will play its morphed, arc-protecting zone almost exclusively. KU’s four-guard lineup and 3-point success (40.5% on the year) means the Devils can’t afford to give up many open looks.

Ahead of Sunday’s blue blood matchup at CenturyLink Center, Krzyzewski voiced his concern with KU’s perimeter attack, pointing out Duke’s zone and transition defense will have to be effective.

“They get a lot of 3’s,” the five-time national-title winning coach said. “Bill's teams have always attacked in transition and not necessarily just to throw it into the post or drive. They'll take early 3’s and good ones. So we have to be able to cut down the number of good looks they get in transition and in the half court.”

Because Kansas doesn’t play two big men, Carter could find himself in difficult spots when a KU guard has the ball in the high post and Carter has to defend multiple players, as well as anticipate angles, as his teammates try to collapse down and help him out.

Carter said that’s where his lateral quickness is key. He can fake or step hard toward the high post with the hope of baiting a pass away. If successful, he can just wall-up on the next offensive player that comes his way inside.

Every time the ball makes its way to the high post, Carter tries to anticipate what’s coming next, and the most difficult possibilities tend to be a lob or a shot.

“Yeah, it makes it hard, because I’m not going to be perfect every time,” Carter said of the challenge. “They’re gonna score sometimes, but I’m gonna do all I can to prevent them from scoring.”

15th-year KU coach Bill Self, looking to get the Jayhawks to their third Final Four under his watch, credited Krzyzewski for moving to zone, a strategy that has worked for Syracuse for so long. The Jayhawks, of course, defeated the Orange’s version of the 2-3 zone this past December (and weren’t as successful the very next game, in a loss to Washington and its zone).

“You know, even though we played Syracuse early in the season, we didn't do a good job of attacking it at all. We just made shots, made some hard shots,” Self said.

KU’s coach thinks what makes Duke’s zone so tough to overcome is the wingspans of its defenders, likening that aspect of it to the more successful Baylor zones of the past.

“You can't simulate the length that some of the teams can play with, and primarily the way Duke can play with theirs. And they also have — even though they want their bigs to stay in the game, but they've got multiple bigs they can put in and do some things,” Self said. “And I think that's the thing that makes it the hardest is their activity out front and then their length behind it.”

Reply 2 comments from Surrealku Slick50

KU guards can compensate for Udoka Azubuike’s absence by attacking glass

Kansas guard Malik Newman (14) and Kansas guard Lagerald Vick (2) fight for a rebound with TCU forward Kouat Noi (12) during the first half on Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas guard Malik Newman (14) and Kansas guard Lagerald Vick (2) fight for a rebound with TCU forward Kouat Noi (12) during the first half on Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

Kansas City, Mo. — This season’s Kansas basketball team is no stranger to getting beat on the glass. So the top-seeded Jayhawks should feel right at home this week at Sprint Center, where they will try and navigate the Big 12 tournament without injured 7-foot center Udoka Azubuike.

Without question, KU’s offense will miss the high-percentage shots Azubuike, out with a medial collateral ligament sprain, provides with regularity. But the Jayhawks also will look like a lesser version of themselves on the boards, because the sophomore big is the best rebounder on a team that oftentimes struggles to finish stops by securing an opponent’s missed shot.

A massive presence in the paint, Azubuike started every game for Kansas (24-7) this season up to this point, and led the team in rebounding 18 times.

KU won the rebound margin in three of its final four regular-season games — +13 versus Oklahoma, +7 vs. Texas and +7 at Oklahoma State. But the Jayhawks lost that battle in 15 of the 16 games that preceded their more successful stretch.

Against Power 5 competition this season (25 games), KU out-rebounded its opponent five times — the other two came against Arizona State and Kansas State.

So what does the team that finished 9th in the Big 12 in rebound margin (-2.9 a game) look like without its best rebounder? To try and get a sense of what to expect at the conference tournament, let’s look at a few of Azubuike’s less impactful games this season on the glass.

Occasionally, Azubuike, who averaged 7.1 boards on the year and 6.6 a game in league action, finished with 4 or fewer rebounds. That occurred four times during Big 12 play:

  • at TCU: 1 rebound in 13 minutes (fouled out); TCU scored 14 second-chance points — KU won 88-84

  • at Kansas State: 3 rebounds in 18 minutes; K-State scored 9 second-chance points — KU won 70-56

  • at Baylor: 4 rebounds in 19 minutes; BU scored 14 second-chance points — KU lost 80-64

  • at Iowa State: 3 rebounds in 22 minutes; ISU scored 10 second-chance points — KU won 83-77

Kansas forward Mitch Lightfoot (44) pulls a rebound from Oklahoma State forward Mitchell Solomon (41) during the second half, Saturday, March 3, 2018 at Gallagher-Iba Arena, in Stillwater, Okla.

Kansas forward Mitch Lightfoot (44) pulls a rebound from Oklahoma State forward Mitchell Solomon (41) during the second half, Saturday, March 3, 2018 at Gallagher-Iba Arena, in Stillwater, Okla. by Nick Krug

At TCU, Mitch Lightfoot (7 rebounds) and Marcus Garrett (6 boards) helped carry the load. At K-State, Malik Newman came through with 10 rebounds and Svi Mykhailiuk grabbed 7 more. At ISU, Newman and Devonte’ Graham tied for the team lead (6 apiece).

The Jayhawks lost at Baylor when no one stepped up to fill the void. Mykhailiuk, Newman and Lagerald Vick each finished with 4 boards.

KU’s rebounding numbers — and chances of advancing in the Big 12 tournament — will look a lot worse unless Azubuike’s teammates use his absence as incentive to really attack the glass.

“We’ve been a poor rebounding team by good rebounding team standards all year long,” KU coach Bill Self said Wednesday at Sprint Center.

It doesn’t sound as if Self is expecting Lightfoot and De Sousa to suddenly start rebounding like Cole Aldrich and Thomas Robinson.

“So we’re just going to have to have our guards rebound more,” Self said. “You know, Malik’s done a good job. Svi and Lagerald have got to become better rebounders probably as much as anyone.”

The numbers indicate Kansas should be able to count on Newman to get inside and clear some defensive rebounds. The 6-3 guard, per sports-reference.com, is KU’s second-most consistent rebounder on that end, gathering an estimated 15.6% of available defensive rebounds (Azubuike leads the team with a 20.2% defensive rebound percentage.)

Newman can look for some help on that end from Garrett (15.6%). Lightfoot enters the postseason with a 12.4% mark, while De Sousa, with far fewer minutes to give a better sense of his ceiling, owns a 12.3% defensive rebound percentage.

It’s unrealistic to expect any Jayhawks to match Azubuike’s offensive impact. But, chipping in as a committee of rebounders at Sprint Center will be necessary for them to get by without their game-changing center.


— Udoka Azubuike 2017-18 season game log —

Game Log Table
Date Opponent   MP FG FGA FG% ORB DRB TRB BLK PF PTS
2017-11-10Tennessee StateW3067.8572462213
2017-11-14KentuckyW34551.0005382313
2017-11-17South Dakota StateW2389.8890222217
2017-11-21Texas SouthernW27912.7502791220
2017-11-24OaklandW201016.62564102221
2017-11-28ToledoW2469.6670550212
2017-12-02SyracuseW23331.000189146
2017-12-06WashingtonL2356.8332792310
2017-12-10Arizona StateL2267.8573692213
2017-12-16NebraskaW261317.76555101326
2017-12-18Nebraska-OmahaW2257.714210122111
2017-12-21StanfordW261215.8004372324
2017-12-29TexasW29611.54567130313
2018-01-02Texas TechL2846.6673471311
2018-01-06Texas ChristianW13661.0000110514
2018-01-09Iowa StateW2945.800156439
2018-01-13Kansas StateW3289.8894485118
2018-01-15West VirginiaW20551.0002791510
2018-01-20BaylorW3458.6254371214
2018-01-23OklahomaL2245.800336049
2018-01-27Texas A&MW2248.500336438
2018-01-29Kansas StateW18221.000123036
2018-02-03Oklahoma StateL21811.7273250420
2018-02-06Texas ChristianW25610.60038112316
2018-02-10BaylorL19441.000224148
2018-02-13Iowa StateW22910.9000333419
2018-02-17West VirginiaW3178.8753253321
2018-02-19OklahomaW1856.8332683310
2018-02-24Texas TechW2934.750167336
2018-02-26TexasW211011.9092685220
2018-03-03Oklahoma StateL2046.667257048
31 Games753192248.774771432205591426
Provided by CBB at Sports Reference: View Original Table
Generated 3/7/2018.



Reply 6 comments from Zabudda Kurt Eskilson Titus Canby Allan Olson Surrealku Andrew Ralls

Udoka Azubuike playing with more energy, ‘oomph’ as Jayhawks head into March

Kansas center Udoka Azubuike (35) gets up to reject a shot from Texas forward Dylan Osetkowski (21) during the first half on Monday, Feb. 26, 2018 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas center Udoka Azubuike (35) gets up to reject a shot from Texas forward Dylan Osetkowski (21) during the first half on Monday, Feb. 26, 2018 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

It only took 21 minutes Monday against Texas for center Udoka Azubuike to supply Kansas with one of the most productive games of his young career.

The 7-foot sophomore yielded 20 points and often seemed invincible in his domination of the Longhorns’ front line. Defenders have looked overmatched versus Azubuike before, but the big man from Nigeria completely crushed the Longhorns, succeeding on 10 of his 11 attempts in the paint, a foray that included six dunks.

The Jayhawks’ colossus shot 90.9% from the field, the highest mark for KU since Perry Ellis made 11 of 12 (91.7%) versus Iowa State in the 2014 Big 12 Tournament. Azubuike’s 10-for-11 shooting also represented the best outing in a conference game by a Jayhawk since Julian Wright posted the same line against Baylor, in 2006.

Even better for No. 6 Kansas (24-6 overall, 13-4 Big 12), Azubuike looked lively on the defensive end of the court, as well, tying his career high with 5 blocked shots.

The commanding performance left KU’s senior point guard, Devonte’ Graham, wanting more.

“That’s exactly how he should play,” Graham said, noting assistant coach Norm Roberts went up to Azubuike at shoot-around the day of the game and conveyed the absence of Longhorns star center Mo Bamba (injured) didn’t mean KU’s center could take the day off.

“You should want to go even harder because you’ve got a mismatch now,” Graham related of Roberts’ directive. “So he played exactly how Coach Rob wanted him to play.”

After watching his 18-year-old center’s thrashing of UT bigs Jericho Sims and Dylan Osetkowski, KU coach Bill Self, of course, appreciated not just the point production, but Azubuike’s overall effort, which Self agreed is becoming more consistent late in the season.

Kansas center Udoka Azubuike (35) puts a shot over Texas forward Dylan Osetkowski (21) during the second half on Monday, Feb. 26, 2018 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas center Udoka Azubuike (35) puts a shot over Texas forward Dylan Osetkowski (21) during the second half on Monday, Feb. 26, 2018 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

“I think he’s playing with a lot more energy and a lot more oomph, probably, than what he was earlier,” Self appraised, calling Azubuike as active as he has seen him this season.

What’s more, the massive sophomore pulled down 8 rebounds for Kansas, the sixth time in 17 Big 12 games he gathered at least that many.

But there was one aspect where Azubuike, Self was quick to point out, seemed to regress. An 18-for-31 free-throw shooter in the nine games following his infamous 1-for-8 night at Oklahoma, in February, KU’s big man missed all four of his attempts at the foul line versus Texas.

“I hadn’t seen him shoot like that in a while,” Self said, after Azubuike even air-balled one try. “So we’ve got to get back in the gym and do a lot (of work) on that.”

In order to maximize Azubuike’s impact in March, Self indicated he and his staff might need to start more closely monitoring how long KU leaves the 285-pound center on the floor.

“He gets his second foul because he’s tired,” Self said of a defensive play on the perimeter, when Azubuike didn’t move his feet quickly enough while trying to hedge against Matt Coleman on a ball screen. The whistle kept Azubuike, a game-altering talent, on the bench the final 6:55 of the first half.

“That worries me a little bit,” Self said. “I probably need to not let him play as long of stretches.”

Azubuike had been on the floor for 5:03 worth of game clock when he showed fatigue and picked up his second foul.

He didn’t get called for any fouls while playing 12 second-half minutes, a stretch during which Azubuike made 6 of 7 shots, swatted 3 UT attempts and gathered 5 rebounds.

The mightiest presence on the KU roster played for stretches of 6:33 and 4:04 during the second half, as well as a brief 0:20 stint late in the win.

No one else in a Kansas uniform possesses the same potential as Azubuike to influence outcomes on both ends of the floor. As critical as Graham and Svi Mykhailiuk are for Kansas, a “turned-up,” as Self likes to say, Azubuike will be equally paramount in the weeks ahead in order for the Jayhawks to reach their ceiling.

Reply 13 comments from James Miller Brett Arnberger Plasticjhawk Barry Weiss Dirk Medema Boardshorts Longhawk1976 Len Shaffer Oldalum Bryce Landon

5 stats that popped for Kansas in a Senior Night win over Texas

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) pulls up for a three pointer during the first half on Monday, Feb. 26, 2018 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) pulls up for a three pointer during the first half on Monday, Feb. 26, 2018 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

The No. 6-ranked team in the nation, Kansas sent seniors Devonte’ Graham and Svi Mykhailiuk out in style on Big Monday, with an 80-70 win over Texas in the Jayhawks’ Allen Fieldhouse finale.

KU (24-6 overall, 13-4 Big 12) at times overwhelmed the undermanned Longhorns, even out-rebounding the visitors 37-30 — just the Jayhawks’ third positive margin in that category during league play.

Here are five more statistics that stood out for Kansas, on a night the program wrapped up an 18th outright Big 12 championship and finished the home portion of the schedule with a victory for the 35th consecutive season.

So many quality shots

A game that in the first half felt as if a blowout was just a spurt or two away never got there because Kansas didn’t play particularly well down the final stretch, with 9 turnovers after halftime.

Still, the Jayhawks had little reason to feel threatened — even when Texas cut the lead to 6 early in the second half — because KU’s players kept searching for the high-percentage shots the Longhorns’ defense would allow them.

Kansas, a team that entered the night shooting a respectable 46.9% from the field in Big 12 play, made 60.6% of its shots in the first half and an even 60% in the second.

This game didn’t have the drubbing factor of KU’s win over Oklahoma a week earlier, but the Jayhawks showed the same offensive persistence.

Points in the paint

Kansas center Udoka Azubuike (35) hammers in a dunk before Texas forward Jericho Sims (20) during the first half on Monday, Feb. 26, 2018 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas center Udoka Azubuike (35) hammers in a dunk before Texas forward Jericho Sims (20) during the first half on Monday, Feb. 26, 2018 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

A direct result of their determination, the Jayhawks always felt comfortable because they kept finishing possessions with dunks (9) and layups (13).

The Jayhawks achieved 50 paint points for just the second time this season, putting up 52 inside against a Mo Bamba-less Texas team. Previously in conference play, KU had only reached 40 points in the category three times — twice against Oklahoma and once versus Iowa State — doing so against two of the Big 12’s worst defenses.

Udoka Azubuike proved uncontrollable for UT, shooting 10 of 11 and coming through with rim-shaking dunks six different times.

His teammates who don’t have the size and frame to slam so effortlessly settled for an array of layups, as well as a few wide-open dunks.

Freshman Marcus Garrett scored 6 of his 11 points off layups. Sophomore backup big Mitch Lightfoot scored all 6 of his points at the rim, via two dunks and a lay-in. Malik Newman, on a 4-for-9 shooting night, picked up one layup and one jam. Mykhailiuk scored two lay-ins on the way to 17 points. Graham spent most of the night distributing 11 assists but scored a layup, too. Junior Lagerald Vick made two shots all night, both in the paint. Freshman Silvio De Sousa scored his one basket on a putback.

Kansas scored 56% of its points off layups and dunks, winning points in the paint, 52-38.

Scouting report defense

At times the Jayhawks had issues with trying to stop two of the Longhorns’ most athletic finishers, big man Jericho Sims (6-for-9 shooting) and Kerwin Roach II (7 of 15).

Playing minus Bamba and Eric Davis Jr., the Longhorns only had so many options on offense.

Kansas welcomed two of UT’s least effective scorers to take a bulk of the shots and defended them appropriately to come away with stops. Longhorns big Dylan Osetkowski made just 5 of 14 shots, while Jacob Young finished 6 of 13.

Outside of Sims and Roach, the rest of the Longhorns combined to hit 16 of 44 shots (36.4%).

Mr. 40 Minutes Double-Double

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) celebrates a dunk from Kansas forward Mitch Lightfoot (44) during the first half on Monday, Feb. 26, 2018 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) celebrates a dunk from Kansas forward Mitch Lightfoot (44) during the first half on Monday, Feb. 26, 2018 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

Look out, Azubuike. Mr. 40 Minutes is coming for your double-double crown.

For the 15th time this season, Graham played every minute for Kansas. In his fieldhouse finale, the senior point guard put up 10 points and 11 assists, his fourth double-double of the season.

Sophomore 7-footer Azubuike leads the team with five double-doubles this year.

With one game left in the regular season and the Big 12 and NCAA tournaments to follow, who would you expect to finish the season as KU’s double-double leader? It’s hard to bet against Graham.

On the season, Graham is averaging 17.7 points and 7.2 assists, while Azubuike is contributing 13.9 points and 7.1 rebounds.

Quick-start Svi

Kansas guard Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk gives a hug to Kansas head coach Bill Self before his senior speech.

Kansas guard Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk gives a hug to Kansas head coach Bill Self before his senior speech. by Nick Krug

Mykhailiuk is making a habit of igniting KU’s offense early in games.

With 14 first-half points on 6-for-9 shooting during the first 20 minutes, the senior from Ukraine scored 13 or more points before intermission for the eighth time this season.

Whether driving in to finish inside or showing off his smooth 3-point stroke (45% accuracy as a senior), Mykhailiuk’s offense so often is just what Kansas needs to get rolling.

After making 3 of 5 from 3-point distance in the win, Mykhailiuk has drained 95 from long range this season, the fourth-most in KU history.







More news and notes from Kansas vs. Texas


By the Numbers: Kansas 80, Texas 70.

By the Numbers: Kansas 80, Texas 70.

Reply 1 comment from Surrealku

5 stats that popped for Kansas in a title-securing road win at Texas tech

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) puts up a shot after a foul from Texas Tech center Norense Odiase (32) during the second half on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018 at United Supermarkets Arena.

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) puts up a shot after a foul from Texas Tech center Norense Odiase (32) during the second half on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018 at United Supermarkets Arena. by Nick Krug

The No. 8-ranked Kansas Jayhawks headed to No. 6 Texas Tech this weekend armed with the knowledge it would take a complete performance to win on the road and accomplish something special.

And then they went out and made it happen.

KU secured at least a share of an unprecedented 14th consecutive conference championship, edging the Red Raiders, 74-72, on Saturday .

The Jayhawks (23-6 overall, 12-4 Big 12) shot 50% from the field in an opponent’s arena for just the second time this year to take a two-game lead on Tech (22-7, 10-6) with two games to play.

Here are five statistics that fueled KU’s title-securing road victory.

Graham steals the show

Devonte’ Graham went to Lubbock, Texas, to win a Big 12 title and cement his case for conference player of the year. The senior point guard didn’t state his intentions ahead of the anticipated showdown with Texas Tech, but he sure showed them in the decisive half.

The Jayhawks converted 10 field goals over the game’s final 20 minutes and Graham provided 7 of them. Not done there, Graham also assisted on 2 other KU baskets, with passes to Mitch Lightfoot and Malik Newman.

Graham’s pair of second-half 3-pointers — one at the 8:30 mark and another with 4:40 left — both pushed KU’s lead to 8, the largest margins of the final half.

The Jayhawks’ floor general and team leader scored 18 of KU’s 33 second-half points off 7-for-13 shooting, while the rest of the Jayhawks were a combined 3 of 12.

No deficit for Kansas

Let’s be honest. Who would have predicted the Jayhawks would play on Texas Tech’s home floor and not trail for a single second?

The Red Raiders had won 17 straight inside United Supermarkets Arena. It seemed unfathomable, but Tech played the entire 40 minutes without ever taking a lead against Kansas.

Three-pointers from Svi Mykhailiuk and Graham fueled an 8-0 Kansas start. And though the Red Raiders would eventually tie the game at 68 with 2:32 left in the second half, KU’s defense forced turnovers on the home team’s next two possessions, while Graham scored twice, pushing the Jayhawks’ lead back out to 4.

Prior to that, each time Tech threatened to take momentum while making it a one-possession game, the Jayhawks had an answer. Whether it was a bucket from Graham for an old school 3-point play, a Newman 3-pointer of a Graham layup, Kansas always found a way to keep Texas Tech down, as the home team shot 36.7% from the floor in the second half.

Active Azubuike

Kansas center Udoka Azubuike (35) fights for a rebound with Texas Tech forward Tommy Hamilton IV (0) during the first half on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018 at United Supermarkets Arena.

Kansas center Udoka Azubuike (35) fights for a rebound with Texas Tech forward Tommy Hamilton IV (0) during the first half on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018 at United Supermarkets Arena. by Nick Krug

Udoka Azubuike didn’t have one of his more memorable games, finishing with just 6 points and 7 rebounds in 29 minutes. But it’s just as important for Kansas that the 7-foot center take an active approach defensively.

Was the big man perfect? No. But a good way to measure the effort he’s exerting is by tracking his results on the defensive glass. Azubuike finished a KU stop with a defensive board 6 times. It was just the fifth time in Big 12 play this year he reached that total.

The Red Raiders challenged Azubuike, making him work for position and rebounds, and he often responded correctly. The sophomore center jumped as high as he ever has for a few rebounds.

On another occasion, he battled a Red Raider to smack a missed Tech shot into the hands of Newman, who got credit for the rebound in the box score. Early in the second half, he hustled back on defense to take away a potential Tech layup, and in doing so forced Tommy Hamilton IV into a turnover. With just more than a minute to play, Azubuike and Mykhailiuk trapped Zach Smith on the baseline, pressuring him into a pass out of bounds and an untimely giveaway.

Plus, Azubuike swatted away three Red Raiders shots, denying Smith twice and Culver another time inside.

Tech kept KU’s massive sophomore from his typical array of powerful dunks, but Azubuike didn’t let any frustrations with his lack of offense carry over to every aspect of his game. He can, and needs to be, better on the defensive glass (see: Tech’s 15 offensive rebounds), but Azubuike’s motor seems to be becoming more consistent.

Ailing Evans

Kansas guard Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk (10) strips a pass from Texas Tech guard Keenan Evans (12) during the first half on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018 at United Supermarkets Arena.

Kansas guard Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk (10) strips a pass from Texas Tech guard Keenan Evans (12) during the first half on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018 at United Supermarkets Arena. by Nick Krug

Texas Tech star Keenan Evans hasn’t been himself since injuring a toe the week before Saturday’s meeting with Kansas. To Evans’ credit, the senior is attempting to play through pain. But the timing couldn’t have been worse for the Red Raiders.

For the third straight game, Evans’ hampered toe made him less effective, and for the third straight game his team lost by single digits.

Evans played 31 minutes against Kansas, the most for Tech’s primary guard since hurting his toe, but made just 1 of 6 shots from the floor and 4 of 6 free throws, finishing with 6 points and 3 assists.

In the seven games before suffering the injury during a loss to Baylor, Evans averaged 24.6 points and 3.7 assists. He hasn’t been able to play as assertively since. Would Tech have defeated BU and Oklahoma State with a healthy Evans? Would KU have been able to win on Tech’s floor with the Red Raiders’ best player at full strength? We’ll never know for sure, but KU certainly has benefited in the standings from the inconvenient timing of Evans’ setback.

Svi’s hot start

Kansas guard Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk (10) puts back a shot before Texas Tech guard Keenan Evans (12) and Texas Tech guard Jarrett Culver (23) during the first half on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018 at United Supermarkets Arena.

Kansas guard Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk (10) puts back a shot before Texas Tech guard Keenan Evans (12) and Texas Tech guard Jarrett Culver (23) during the first half on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018 at United Supermarkets Arena. by Nick Krug

In a game between the Big 12’s two best teams, Kansas led by as many as 11 points on the road before halftime because Texas Tech couldn’t stop Mykhailiuk in the first half.

The senior guard from Ukraine helped his team build confidence early, knocking down three 3-pointers in the first 10 minutes. Mykhailiuk scored a first-half best 15 points on 5-for-10 shooting and also assisted a Graham 3-pointer, a Lightfoot basket and an Azubuike jam before intermission.

Mykhailiuk finished with 21 points, second only to Graham’s game-high 26, and tied with Graham for the game’s highest assist total, with 4. Fitting that two seniors carry Kansas to a historic accomplishment.





By the Numbers: Kansas 74, Texas Tech 72.

By the Numbers: Kansas 74, Texas Tech 72.

Reply 3 comments from David Robinett Surrealku

5 stats that popped for Kansas in a comeback victory over West Virginia

Kansas guard Lagerald Vick (2) hangs for a shot over West Virginia forward Maciej Bender (25) during the first half, Saturday, Feb. 17, 2018 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas guard Lagerald Vick (2) hangs for a shot over West Virginia forward Maciej Bender (25) during the first half, Saturday, Feb. 17, 2018 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

By the end of Saturday night, Kansas found itself once again tied with Texas Tech atop the Big 12 standings, thanks in part to a huge performance from its massive center, Udoka Azubuike.

The Jayhawks recovered from a 12-point, second-half deficit against West Virginia at Allen Fieldhouse for a 77-69 victory, while Texas Tech lost at Baylor, making the two league title contenders both 10-4 in Big 12 games.

Here are five statistics that proved to be critical components of KU’s wild home win.

Points in the paint

KU coach Bill Self said after the comeback win he and his assistants hammered home to their players the need to “drive it, drive it, drive it” against WVU’s extended defensive pressure.

By taking on the role of the aggressors, the Jayhawks were able to survive the Mountaineers’ torrent of 3-point shooting (14 of 26).

Kansas outscored WVU 30-16 in the paint. While Azubuike gets most of the credit, what with his four dunks and three layups, his teammates supplemented the center’s ultra-high-percentage shots.

Both Marcus Garrett and Lagerald Vick contributed 4 paint-points apiece in the first half. Svi Mykahiliuk made a layup in the first and took a steal for a slam in the second. Both Vick and Malik Newman came through with much-needed lay-ins during KU’s second-half revival.

The Jayhawks’ 14-point advantage inside marked the first time in Big 12 play they enjoyed a double-digit margin in the category.

Valuing possessions

Bob Huggins-coached teams are known for their pesky defenders. And West Virginia might have the best on-ball stopper in the Big 12 in Jevon Carter.

But the Jayhawks didn’t let the Mountaineers’ style speed them up into a lesser, turnover-prone version of themselves. Kansas finished with just 8 turnovers, its second-lowest total of the season, against WVU.

The Mountaineers only came away with 4 steals over the course of 40 minutes.

In total, KU had 64 possessions, and scored (56.3% of the time) far more often than it gave the ball away (12.5%).

Few sloppy offensive trips meant only 8 points off turnovers for West Virginia. In the meantime, the Jayhawks cashed in on 13 WVU giveaways to score 15 points.

Carter’s shooting woes

Kansas forward Mitch Lightfoot (44) defends against a shot from West Virginia guard Jevon Carter (2) during the first half, Saturday, Feb. 17, 2018 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas forward Mitch Lightfoot (44) defends against a shot from West Virginia guard Jevon Carter (2) during the first half, Saturday, Feb. 17, 2018 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

KU deserves some credit for properly defending Carter down the stretch, but the WVU senior point guard shoulders some blame, too, for how the final minutes of the second half played out.

Carter only connected on 3 of 10 shots in the final half, and he often forced the issue or settled down the stretch.

In the final 10 minutes, after WVU took its largest lead of the game, Carter missed six of his eight attempts, including two errant layups. One of his makes, a 3-pointer, didn’t come until KU had all but sealed the win, with six seconds remaining.

Blocks = points

Kansas center Udoka Azubuike (35) gets up to block a shot from West Virginia forward Esa Ahmad (23) during the second half, Saturday, Feb. 17, 2018 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas center Udoka Azubuike (35) gets up to block a shot from West Virginia forward Esa Ahmad (23) during the second half, Saturday, Feb. 17, 2018 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

Azubuike didn’t just make his presence felt on offense, he tormented WVU playing defense, as well, particularly in crunch time. Even better for the Jayhawks, two of the center’s late-game swats led directly to scores.

Carter had a layup smacked away by Azubuike with 2:19 left and within seconds Mykhailiuk secured the ball and found Devonte’ Graham, who pitched it ahead to Newman for a game-tying 3-pointer.

With West Virginia down four and less than 20 seconds left on the clock, Azubuike was at it again, blocking a Daxter Miles Jr. attempt. Graham came away with the basketball and heaved a pass ahead for a Newman layup that pushed KU’s lead to 72-66 before Huggins got T’d up twice and ejected.

Hit ’em when they count

Even before the Jayhawks got to pad their free-throw numbers in the final seconds thanks to Huggins’ technicals, they made their trips to the foul line count late in the game.

The free throws in the final minutes were challenging because Kansas had to have them. The home team got to celebrate Saturday night because its players made 12 of 14 free throws in the last 5:00 — including 7-of-8 shooting while either trailing or ahead by 2 when stepping to the line.

Azubuike made a pair with 4:58 left to cut WVU’s lead to four.

Vick went 1 of 2 with 4:14 on the clock, making it a five-point game.

Mykhailiuk nailed a pair with 1:40 remaining to put Kansas up for the first time since the opening minute of the second half.

Graham knocked in two more with 0:24 to go, extending the lead to four.








More news and notes from Kansas vs. West Virginia


By the Numbers: Kansas 77, West Virginia 69.

By the Numbers: Kansas 77, West Virginia 69.

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