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Posts tagged with Malik Newman

New mock draft projects just 2 Jayhawks getting selected in 2018

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) and Kansas guard Malik Newman (14) celebrate a three in overtime by Newman, Sunday, March 25, 2018 at CenturyLink Center in Omaha, Neb.

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) and Kansas guard Malik Newman (14) celebrate a three in overtime by Newman, Sunday, March 25, 2018 at CenturyLink Center in Omaha, Neb. by Nick Krug

As the NBA Draft Combine gets underway in Chicago, it’s important to remember that not all analysts are as high on this year’s crop of Kansas prospects as others.

While ESPN long has included Devonte’ Graham, Malik Newman and Svi Mykhailiuk among its list of projected second-rounders for 2018, the newly unveiled mock draft at The Ringer only expects two Jayhawks to earn selections.

A little more than a month ahead of the draft, The Ringer’s guide forecasts Newman as the first Kansas player off the board, with the 21-year-old guard going 44th overall (14th in the second round).

Unlike ESPN’s mock, which currently values Graham as the best player from KU, The Ringer slotted the 23-year-old point guard at No. 53 in the 60-pick draft.

Graham’s four-year year teammate and on-and-off-the-court running mate, Mykhailiuk, didn’t appear on the list.

Kansas guard Malik Newman (14) pulls back to shoot against Villanova guard Phil Booth (5) during the second half, Saturday, March 31, 2018 at the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas.

Kansas guard Malik Newman (14) pulls back to shoot against Villanova guard Phil Booth (5) during the second half, Saturday, March 31, 2018 at the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas. by Nick Krug

Ringer draft pundit Kevin O’Connor, who provided scouting reports on the likely draftees, touted Newman for his “spark-plug scoring,” describing the redshirt sophomore guard who helped KU reach the Final Four as “a pure bucket-getter who can generate offense off the bench, though his defense limits his upside.”

And because it’s officially player comp season, The Ringer’s comprehensive guide includes a handy profile of each draft hopeful. Likely in order to tone down any basketball-internet backlash against the analysis, instead of straight comparisons — which typically are unfair anyway — each profile includes names of past or current NBA players who one might see “shades of” while watching a prospect.

When inspecting video of Newman, O’Connor noticed some similarities to Monta Ellis, Dion Waiters and Seth Curry.

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) runs up the court with the ball during the first half, Friday, March 23, 2018 at CenturyLink Center in Omaha, Neb.

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) runs up the court with the ball during the first half, Friday, March 23, 2018 at CenturyLink Center in Omaha, Neb. by Nick Krug

As far as Graham’s potential is concerned, his main selling point was described as “gritty defense.”

O’Connor’s scouting report described the KU All-American as “a high-energy, hard-nosed defender who improved his point guard skills as a senior.”

In Graham’s footage, he saw “shades of” a “lean” Kyle Lowry, Fred VanVleet and Scottie Wilbekin.

O’Connor lists Newman as the No. 41 prospect in the draft class, and Graham at No. 48. Ringer staffers Danny Chau and Jonathan Tjarks also provided their own big boards. Chau placed Newman 48th, with Graham 50th. Tjarks gauged Newman as the 42nd-best player, and had Graham 44th.

The good news for Newman and Graham, as well as Mykhailiuk, and former KU teammates Billy Preston, Lagerald Vick and Udoka Azubuike is the pre-draft process is just beginning. The days and weeks ahead — and how they perform in workouts, scrimmages and interviews — will ultimately determine their draft stock. Now it’s up to them to prove themselves to NBA coaches and executives.

Check out The Ringer’s complete draft guide

Reply 4 comments from Harlan Hobbs The_muser Onlyoneuinkansas Tony Bandle

KU’s Malik Newman has heard his game reminiscent of a couple NBA guards

Kansas guard Malik Newman (14) heads in against the Clemson defense during the first half, Friday, March 23, 2018 at CenturyLink Center in Omaha, Neb.

Kansas guard Malik Newman (14) heads in against the Clemson defense during the first half, Friday, March 23, 2018 at CenturyLink Center in Omaha, Neb. by Nick Krug

While four of the league’s best teams remain alive (technically) for the 2018 championship, it’s currently pre-draft season for most NBA franchises.

Prospects and evaluations will dominate conversations in the coming days at the NBA Draft Combine, in Chicago, as executives, coaches and scouts scrutinize the viability of the 69 draft hopefuls in attendance. As everyone involved with the combine attempts to forecast the careers of the candidates on display, player comparisons almost become unavoidable.

From his days as a five-star prospect in Jackson, Miss., to the past three years as an aspiring NBA player at Mississippi State and the University of Kansas, Malik Newman has heard his name tied with various supposedly similar professional guards who came before him.

In the midst of his stunning NCAA Tournament run with the Jayhawks — 21. 6 points per game, 47.1% shooting, 15-for-34 on 3-pointers, 27-for-30 on free throws — Newman was presented with a player comparison, courtesy of a former KU guard. While watching Newman go against Clemson in the Sweet 16, former Bill Self pupil Russell Robinson tweeted out that Newman’s game reminded him of 13-year NBA veteran Lou Williams.

None by Russell Robinson

Like Newman, Williams was a McDonald’s All-American in high school. Since bypassing college for the NBA in 2005, the 6-foot-1 guard has scored 11,807 career points, picking up the Sixth Man of the Year award in 2015. Williams’ most recent season, his 13th, was his best, as he averaged 22.6 points and 5.3 assists — both career highs — garnering all-star consideration while primarily coming off the bench for the Los Angeles Clippers.

Listed at 6-3 and more of a scorer than distributor at heart, did Newman like being connected him Williams?

Kansas guard Malik Newman (14) pulls up for a three during the first half, Thursday, March 15, 2018 at Intrust Bank Arena in Wichita, Kan.

Kansas guard Malik Newman (14) pulls up for a three during the first half, Thursday, March 15, 2018 at Intrust Bank Arena in Wichita, Kan. by Nick Krug

“Yeah. I love Lou Will’s game,” Newman replied in late March. “I feel like he’s an underrated scorer in the league. That’s what he’s known for is getting buckets. So, I mean, I’ll definitely take that.”

Oddly enough, Newman said two comparisons he often had received were to Williams and another former Sixth Man of the Year (2005), 6-3 guard Ben Gordon, the third overall pick by Chicago in 2004.

“So I’ll definitely take both of those,” Newman added.

He won’t be a lottery pick like Gordon was coming out of UConn. But if Newman wants to follow someone’s career trajectory to NBA success, Williams would serve as an ideal role model. In 2005, Philadelphia selected Williams in the middle of the second round (No. 45 overall). Entering this week’s combine, ESPN’s Jonathan Givony projects Newman as a mid-second round pick (No. 44 overall).

Some players go into this pre-draft process with unrealistic expectations for themselves. In fact, it’s possible for some to entertain impractical ideas after hearing from people employed in the NBA. This past March, one league executive told TNT’s David Aldridge that Newman reminded him of Ray Allen “in size, personality and shooting ability,” characterizing the possibly overlooked Newman as a “value pick.” Allen is a 10-time all-star and hall of famer.

Kansas guard Malik Newman (14) puts up a three over Duke guard Grayson Allen (3) during the second half, Sunday, March 25, 2018 at CenturyLink Center in Omaha, Neb.

Kansas guard Malik Newman (14) puts up a three over Duke guard Grayson Allen (3) during the second half, Sunday, March 25, 2018 at CenturyLink Center in Omaha, Neb. by Nick Krug

It’s to Newman’s credit that someone would even conjure up such a career track for him. It’s also encouraging that he isn’t headed to the combine thinking he’s about to become an all-time great.

Newman said he doesn’t even have a specific NBA player he tries to model his game after. His two favorites are Russell Westbrook and Damian Lillard. But he’s not claiming to be either of those all-stars. He’s not even hyping himself as the next Lou Williams or Ben Gordon — though he’d leave the league fulfilled if able to mirror either of their careers.

Grounded while confident is an ideal approach for a prospect entering the pre-draft process, and it seems Newman is willing to follow that strategy, even as more player comparisons are likely to be thrown his way in the weeks leading up to the June 21 draft.

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Ready for launch: Malik Newman explains his March Madness emergence

Kansas guard Malik Newman (14) floats in to the bucket against Duke forward Javin DeLaurier (12) during the second half, Sunday, March 25, 2018 at CenturyLink Center in Omaha, Neb.

Kansas guard Malik Newman (14) floats in to the bucket against Duke forward Javin DeLaurier (12) during the second half, Sunday, March 25, 2018 at CenturyLink Center in Omaha, Neb. by Nick Krug

San Antonio — One of the breakout stars of March Madness, Malik Newman picked up his second Most Outstanding Player award of the postseason in the aftermath of an Elite Eight victory over Duke.

After emerging as the top performer of the Big 12 tournament a few weeks earlier, the Kansas sophomore proved his Sprint Center shows were no fluke once the Jayhawks began their Final Four run.

Through four KU victories in the NCAA Tournament, Newman leads the team with 21.8 points per game and 13-for-29 shooting (44.8%) from 3-point range.

Earlier this week, Newman joined the March Madness 365 podcast, with Andy Katz, to discuss his dazzling March and how his KU coaches and teammates helped him took off.

“My confidence is at an all-time high right now. I probably feel as confident as I’ve ever felt,” Newman told Katz. “I’m having fun with the group of guys that I’m with and we’re just enjoying the moment.”

A McDonald’s All-American in high school and considered one of the top talents in the class of 2015, Newman began his college career at Mississippi State, where he experienced a 14-17 freshman season before taking a crack at the NBA combine while maintaining his amateur status. Eventually, he decided to transfer to Kansas.

Needless to say, the 6-foot-3 guard from Jackson, Miss., had never experienced anything quite like KU’s overtime win against Duke in the Elite Eight. Newman, of course, scored all 13 of KU’s points in OT, en route to a career-high 32. The fact that it came in a “historical matchup” between blue blood programs, he added, made it all the more satisfying.

“It’s got to be at the top of the list. Most definitely at the top of the list,” Newman replied, when asked where that game ranks for him. “As a kid, this is what you dream about. The AAU circuits and all the AAU games that you play, it will never amount to playing in the Elite Eight game and advancing to the Final Four.”

Kansas guard Malik Newman (14), the MVP for the Midwest Regional, hoists the remainder of the net as the Jayhawks celebrate a trip to the Final Four following their 85-81 overtime victory over Duke on Sunday in Omaha, Neb.

Kansas guard Malik Newman (14), the MVP for the Midwest Regional, hoists the remainder of the net as the Jayhawks celebrate a trip to the Final Four following their 85-81 overtime victory over Duke on Sunday in Omaha, Neb. by Nick Krug

Who knows what Newman would be doing now if he had just turned pro after leaving Mississippi State two years ago. He said he had to “get healthy” and “learn the game some more,” instead of trying to work his way into the NBA while playing in less glamorous leagues. Newman is glad he ended up with Bill Self and his coaching staff at Kansas.

“I think they did a great job of molding me into what I am right now, and I just think those guys did a great job of pushing me every day,” Newman said.

Now Newman is preparing for a Final Four semifinal against Villanova as a far better player than he was two years ago. Sitting out a full season as a transfer, it turned out, had its benefits, as he got to watch and practice against Frank Mason III, Josh Jackson and Devonte’ Graham.

“Those guys are skilled players, so I was able to steal some things from them,” Newman said. “And Coach Self, he just did a great job of instilling the Kansas tradition in me. I think it just made me better overall.”

Reply 1 comment from Dannyboy4hawks

5 stats that popped for Kansas in an OT win over Duke that sent KU to the Final Four

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) celebrates a Jayhawk run during the second half, Sunday, March 25, 2018 at CenturyLink Center in Omaha, Neb.

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) celebrates a Jayhawk run during the second half, Sunday, March 25, 2018 at CenturyLink Center in Omaha, Neb. by Nick Krug

The Kansas basketball season isn’t over yet.

The Jayhawks advanced out of the NCAA Tournament’s Midwest region and on to San Antonio by knocking off Duke, in overtime, 85-81, Sunday night.

“Mr. March,” also known as Malik Newman, had plenty to do with KU’s 31st and most memorable victory of the year so far, scoring all 13 of his team’s points in OT.

But the efforts of Newman’s teammates in various other categories proved just as valuable. Here are five statistics that made the Jayhawks’ 15th Final Four appearance, and first since 2012, possible.

Second-chance points

Given KU’s one-big, four-guard lineup and the presence of two potential NBA lottery picks in Duke’s starting frontcourt, it seemed a long night of Marvin Bagley III and Wendell Carter Jr. snagging Blue Devils misses could be in the cards for Kansas.

However, Duke only secured 10 offensive rebounds off 40 missed field goals, finishing with just 11 second-chance points.

KU had come up short in second-chance points in four of its first six postseason victories before outscoring Duke, 15-11, with the help of 17 offensive boards.

Starting center Udoka Azubuike enhanced those numbers with 5 offensive rebounds — his second-best total this season.

Guards Svi Mykhailiuk (3 offensive rebounds), Devonte’ Graham (2), Newman (2) and Marcus Garrett (2) all chipped in when they could, as well.

Late-game stops

Kansas guard Malik Newman (14) defends against Duke guard Grayson Allen (3) during the second half, Sunday, March 25, 2018 at CenturyLink Center in Omaha, Neb.

Kansas guard Malik Newman (14) defends against Duke guard Grayson Allen (3) during the second half, Sunday, March 25, 2018 at CenturyLink Center in Omaha, Neb. by Nick Krug

Whether it was KU locking in, Duke’s legs wearing down or some combination of the two, the Jayhawks spent the final minutes of regulation making stops.

After Grayson Allen fed Wendell Carter Jr. for a layup with 4:25 to go in the second half, KU held Duke without a basket and forced a turnover in the final four minutes, setting up overtime.

Although Allen made two free throws at the 1:59 and 1:25 marks, Kansas barely out-scored Duke, 5-4, during the closing minutes of the second half.

Lagerald Vick blocked Carter with 3:51 on the clock. Azubuike rebounded a missed 3 by Allen with 3:23 left. Trevon Duval turned the ball over at the 2:40 mark. Silvio De Sousa rebounded a Carter misfire with 36 seconds to go in regulation. And KU’s March breakout star, Newman, successfully defended a potential Allen game-winner with 0:03 showing on the clock.

3-point defense

Duke guard Gary Trent Jr. (2) puts up a three over Kansas guard Lagerald Vick (2) during the second half, Sunday, March 25, 2018 at CenturyLink Center in Omaha, Neb.

Duke guard Gary Trent Jr. (2) puts up a three over Kansas guard Lagerald Vick (2) during the second half, Sunday, March 25, 2018 at CenturyLink Center in Omaha, Neb. by Nick Krug

KU knew headed into the Elite Eight showdown that Allen (100 of 267 on 3-pointers, 37.5%) and Gary Trent Jr. (95 of 231, 41.1%) were Duke’s best long-range shooters.

The Jayhawks’ perimeter defenders made sure neither Allen (2 of 9 on 3’s versus KU) or Trent (2 of 10) got hot or found a rhythm.

With the Devils’ marksmen combining to hit just 21% of their 3-pointers, Duke only made 7 of 29 (24%) as a team — the lowest percentage by a KU opponent in the NCAA Tournament this March.

3-point shooting

Kansas guard Lagerald Vick (2) celebrates a three during the second half, Sunday, March 25, 2018 at CenturyLink Center in Omaha, Neb.

Kansas guard Lagerald Vick (2) celebrates a three during the second half, Sunday, March 25, 2018 at CenturyLink Center in Omaha, Neb. by Nick Krug

A season-long ally for the Jayhawks, the 3-point line once again facilitated a Kansas victory.

It wasn’t KU’s 36% success from beyond the arc that made the difference. It was that 39 points (nearly half of the victor’s 85) came from that source.

Kansas hit 13 of 36 from deep between its four starting guards, giving the team 13 or more 3-pointers for the eighth time this season and 10 or more for the 19th occasion in 38 outings.

The Jayhawks out-scored Duke by 18 points from outside the arc, and improved to 17-2 when connecting on at least 10 3-pointers.

Newman went 5 for 12. Mykhailiuk sent the game to OT with a 3-pointer in the final 30 seconds of regulation and made 3 of 9. Graham hit 3 of 8. Vick made at least two from deep for the fifth straight game, connecting on 2 of 7.

26 minutes from De Sousa

Kansas forward Silvio De Sousa (22) blocks a shot by Duke guard Gary Trent Jr. (2) during the second half, Sunday, March 25, 2018 at CenturyLink Center in Omaha, Neb.

Kansas forward Silvio De Sousa (22) blocks a shot by Duke guard Gary Trent Jr. (2) during the second half, Sunday, March 25, 2018 at CenturyLink Center in Omaha, Neb. by Nick Krug

Where would the Jayhawkw be without freshman big man De Sousa right now? Maybe done for the season, instead of packing up for a trip to San Antonio.

With starting center Azubuike battling foul trouble all night — he picked up his fifth and a disqualification with 1:59 to play in the second half — KU needed every minute, rebound, hustle play and defensive stop De Sousa could muster. http://www2.kusports.com/news/2018/ma...

A 6-foot-9 freshman from Angola, De Sousa tied a career high with 26 minutes — the same time he spent on the court in the Big 12 title game, when Azubuike was out with an injury.

The backup big, whom Bill Self barely trusted to keep on the floor in January and February, finished with 4 points, 10 rebounds, 1 assist and 1 block.

After Azubuike fouled out during crunch time, with the season on the line, De Sousa finished off three separate KU stops with a defensive rebound.

His first-half dunk and second-half layup helped KU’s bench out-score the Duke subs, 8-6.


More news and notes from Kansas vs. Duke


By the Numbers: Kansas 85, Duke 81.

By the Numbers: Kansas 85, Duke 81.

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Driving and dishing Devonte’ Graham vital to KU’s 3-point-shooting success

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) pushes the ball to the wing past West Virginia guard Jevon Carter (2) and West Virginia forward Esa Ahmad (23) during the first half, Saturday, March 10, 2018 at Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo.

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) pushes the ball to the wing past West Virginia guard Jevon Carter (2) and West Virginia forward Esa Ahmad (23) during the first half, Saturday, March 10, 2018 at Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo. by Nick Krug

The offensive lifeblood of a four-guard lineup, 3-pointers — sometimes just the mere threat of them — space the floor for Kansas, give 7-footer Udoka Azubuike space to dominate on touches in the paint and have helped make a third consecutive trip to the Sweet 16 possible.

Of their 81.4 points per game this year, the Jayhawks average 30.1 from behind the arc (22nd in Division I). In other words, their opponents know KU’s guards would like nothing more than to drown them in a deluge of 3-pointers.

With foes doing everything within their powers to limit one of this Kansas team’s most effective weapons, timing and precision are vital for getting the best look at the basket possible while rising up from long range. Within an offense that revolves around ball screens, dribble hand-offs and drive-and-kicks it sure helps to have senior point guard Devonte’ Graham penetrating and distributing.

Among the 16 teams still alive in the NCAA Tournament, Graham’s 7.5 assists per game on the season lead all players. While plenty of those dimes come on fast breaks or alley-oops for KU bigs, the guards who play alongside Graham are thankful his kick-out passes allow them to consistently catch and shoot in one fluid motion.

So what percentage of Graham’s deliveries to 3-point shooters are perfect?

Junior Lagerald Vick briefly paused to calculate before responding, with a grin: “I would say about 99.7 of those are right on the money. I definitely think he’s a good passer, especially off penetration and kick.”

A more generous grader, senior Svi Mykhailiuk went ahead and gave Graham a 100.

“I think every time,” Mykhailiuk said. “He knows where I’m going to be and he just passes to me and I’m gonna make a shot.”

Kansas guard Malik Newman (14) puts up a three from the corner over Penn guard Antonio Woods (2) during the first half, Thursday, March 15, 2018 at Intrust Bank Arena in Wichita, Kan.

Kansas guard Malik Newman (14) puts up a three from the corner over Penn guard Antonio Woods (2) during the first half, Thursday, March 15, 2018 at Intrust Bank Arena in Wichita, Kan. by Nick Krug

In KU’s second-round victory over Seton Hall, Graham didn’t have his typical shooting touch, but he assisted on 4 of his team’s 9 successful 3-pointers.

Two days earlier, the Jayhawks only made 7 from deep while defeating Penn. Graham assisted on three and made two 3-pointers.

Per Synergy Sports, Kansas has averaged 17.76 points in its first two NCAA Tournament victories off Graham assists alone — 2.4 points for every dish that sets up a basket.

None by Synergy Sports Tech

Playing to his roster’s strengths, coach Bill Self has the Jayhawks (29-7) run a lot of ball-screen offense. While Graham is a strong 3-point shooter (his 40.4% accuracy ranks 60th in the country), it often falls on the lead guard to make sure senior Mykhailiuk (45.5%, 10th nationally), sophomore Malik Newman (40.9%) and Vick (37.8%) get the ball in advantageous situations once he begins attacking off the dribble.

“You’ve got to make the defense commit to you and I’ve got to find my guys for open shots,” Graham said.

Occasionally, every step of the process comes easily. On one possession against Penn, Graham turned the corner off a Mitch Lightfoot ball screen, drove to the paint and hit Vick, spotting up nearby in the right corner, for a perfect look.

Other times, Graham has to get more crafty.

In one second-half sequence versus Seton Hall, Graham dribbled left off a pick from Azubuike, drawing the attention of four Pirates defenders as he made his way into the paint. Their resulting rotation accounted for Vick in the right corner, which is where his opponents assumed Graham would look.

Instead he bounced a pass through a gap in the defense, all the way out to the right wing for a wide-open Newman 3-pointer.

Of course, Graham knows how to set up teammates for 3-pointers in every way imaginable.

While facing Penn, Graham misfired on a floater he released in the paint. When the ball rimmed out and found its way back to his hands for an offensive rebound, a little court awareness and quick improvisation paid off.

Graham knew where Vick was when he released his shot, so he easily kicked the ball out to his teammate near the left corner upon securing the rebound. Making the best of his circumstances, the point guard’s hustle set up an easy 3-pointer.

“He’s been a pretty good passer since I’ve known him, even when I came my freshman year when he was at the 2,” Vick said, referring to Graham’s days playing with Frank Mason III. “He’s a good passer.”

Graham’s recognition and vision prove valuable in transition, as well. Off a defensive rebound against Seton Hall, with nine players in front of him on the court, Graham knew KU had the spacing on the break for Newman to get an open 3-pointer on the left wing.

The senior point guard also trusted the shot would drop, raising his hands into the air to signal a successful 3 as Newman went into his shooting motion.

Graham’s familiarity with his fellow guards leads to such trust — as well as to so many accurate passes.

“Just playing with them, game experience, knowing where they like the ball at,” Graham said of how his passes so often generate 3-pointers, “and just tying to get it to them where they can just catch and shoot it before the defense goes out.”

Ahead of Friday’s Sweet 16 showdown with Clemson, in Omaha, Neb. (6:07 p.m., CBS), Vick, Mykhailiuk and Newman have combined to make 13 of 26 3-pointers in the tournament. Vick said their confidence as shooters is growing as a result, “especially with the big fella (Azubuike) back.”

Although Graham missed all four of his 3-point tries against Seton Hall after making 3 of 8 in the first round, his fellow guards have him to thank for much of their offensive impact.

“I would just say he knows how to play,” Mykhailiuk said, “and knows how to pass. He’s been doing this his whole life, so I guess he’s pretty good at it.”

Reply 4 comments from Harlan Hobbs Plasticjhawk Brian_leslie

KU guards know how to respond if Devonte’ Graham has an off shooting night

Kansas guard Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk (10) soars in to the bucket during the first half, Saturday, March 17, 2018 in Wichita, Kan.

Kansas guard Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk (10) soars in to the bucket during the first half, Saturday, March 17, 2018 in Wichita, Kan. by Nick Krug

Not even Naismith Award finalists can do it all every single night.

When Kansas star guard Devonte’ Graham’s shots weren’t falling in the second round of the NCAA Tournament, the Jayhawks knew they could look elsewhere and find the scoring they needed to survive.

After Graham knocked down a jumper in the opening minutes Saturday night versus Seton Hall, not one of the six field-goal attempts that followed would drop for KU’s leading scorer.

No big deal. The other three guards in the starting lineup had their floor general’s back. Graham may have only provided eight points, but sophomore Malik Newman, senior Svi Mykhailiuk and junior Lagerald Vick combined for 57 as Kansas advanced to the Sweet 16.

“That’s what we do,” Graham, who averages 17.4 points a game, said matter-of-factly following the fourth single-digit scoring outing of his senior season. “If somebody’s having an off night, somebody’s got to step up, and they did a good job of knocking down shots and being aggressive.”

During a nine-assist night for Graham, he liked the way fellow senior Mykhailiuk (7-for-16 shooting, 2 of 5 on 3-pointers, 16 points, three assists) kept getting to the paint and making plays.

In the final four minutes of the victory that moved top-seeded Kansas on to the Midwest regional semifinals, it was Newman (8-of-14 shooting, 4 of 8 from 3-point range, 28 points, two assists) hitting a must-have 3-pointer, going 8 of 8 at the foul line and finding Mykhailiuk for a clutch 3-pointer that stretched the lead to eight with 1:20 to go.

Kansas guard Malik Newman (14) gets a congratulatory pat on the head from assistant coach Jerrance Howard after a late three-pointer during the first half, Saturday, March 17, 2018 in Wichita, Kan.

Kansas guard Malik Newman (14) gets a congratulatory pat on the head from assistant coach Jerrance Howard after a late three-pointer during the first half, Saturday, March 17, 2018 in Wichita, Kan. by Nick Krug

“Everybody was just being aggressive and being a threat,” Graham said proudly.

Following his fifth straight double-digit scoring game, Vick (5-for-9 shooting, 3 of 4 on 3-pointers, 13 points) echoed the point guard’s reference to an assertive backcourt approach. The 6-foot-5 junior from Memphis scored eight points in a row for Kansas during a 2:09 stretch of the second half.

“We just, all us guards had a talk. We’re the head of the team so we knew everybody had to step up and make plays for each other,” Vick said. “We all just played off each other and were bringing energy.”

Even though Graham went from the 7:57 mark of the first half until the 7:52 mark in the second half without scoring a point for Kansas (29-7), Mykhailiuk said his four-year teammate’s floor game kept Graham as an essential component of KU’s success.

“If he’s on the court he just gives us confidence. He just controls the tempo of the game. He’s a point guard, so he doesn’t need to score, he doesn’t need to get assists,” Mykhailiuk added. “He just needs to do what he does and tell us what to do.”

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) drives against Seton Hall guard Khadeen Carrington (0) during the first half, Saturday, March 17, 2018 in Wichita, Kan.

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) drives against Seton Hall guard Khadeen Carrington (0) during the first half, Saturday, March 17, 2018 in Wichita, Kan. by Nick Krug

During the regular season, a low-scoring game from Graham only cost KU a victory once — Dec. 6, when he shot 1 of 8 and scored three points against Washington’s 2-3 zone in a 74-65 defeat. The Jayhawks rolled against South Dakota State in November, when Graham finished with eight points, and they won an SEC-Big 12 Challenge encounter at Allen Fieldhouse with Texas A&M, when Graham’s 2-for-11 shooting left him with eight points.

Every aspect of the regular season prepares college basketball teams for the madness that awaits in March — even if those lessons don’t seem helpful at the time.

As Kansas moves on to Omaha, Neb., for a Friday matchup with Clemson (25-9), Graham’s teammates aren’t exactly worried about his scoring output moving forward. And if they need to pick up the slack in the points column, they won’t have any reason to panic.

“He still did good,” Mykhailiuk said of the team leader’s uncharacteristic showing in the second round. “He did all he could, and sometimes shots are just not falling down. So it’s a part of the game. I bet he’s gonna play better next time.”

Graham followed his three regular-season single-digit scoring games with 17 points against Texas Southern in a home win, 19 points versus Arizona State in a home loss and 16 points in a road victory at Kansas State.








Reply 4 comments from Corey Sparks Joe Ross Plasticjhawk

Upgraded for March: De Sousa and Newman present new problems for KU’s foes

Kansas forward Silvio De Sousa (22) celebrates following the JayhawksÕ 81-70 win over the Mountaineers in the championship game of the Big 12 Tournament, Saturday, March 10, 2018 at Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo.

Kansas forward Silvio De Sousa (22) celebrates following the JayhawksÕ 81-70 win over the Mountaineers in the championship game of the Big 12 Tournament, Saturday, March 10, 2018 at Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo. by Nick Krug

Whenever Udoka Azubuike returns to the Kansas basketball rotation — whether it’s Thursday against Penn, in the first round of the NCAA Tournament, or in the days that follow — the No. 1 seed in the Midwest region will essentially roll out an updated version of itself, with noticeable upgrades both in the paint and on the perimeter.

The Jayhawks that won the regular-season Big 12 championship barely used freshman big man Silvio De Sousa.

The KU team that captured the league’s postseason tournament crown in Kansas City, Mo., didn’t benefit from one second of Azubuike.

The Kansas team trying to navigate its way to the 2018 Final Four should be able to throw Azubuike, De Sousa and a suddenly-high-scoring Malik Newman at opponents, possibly as soon as the first round.

Senior point guard Devonte’ Graham said De Sousa, who went for 16 points and 10 rebounds in KU’s Big 12 title game win over West Virginia, and Newman, the tournament’s Most Outstanding Player, broke through at just the right time.

“Now on the scouting report it’s not just going to be me, Svi (Mykhailiuk) and Udoka (Azubuike), Malik,” Graham said. “It’s going to be Silvio — they’re going to have to guard everybody. When you’ve got five guys out there that can be in attack mode it’s hard to guard that. It’s perfect timing and the perfect time for them to get hot.”

Newman, a sophomore guard who transferred from Mississippi State, enters his NCAA Tournament debut (1 p.m. Thursday, on TBS) having just averaged 24 points per game on 15-for-22 3-point shooting at the Big 12 tournament.

His explosive three-day-long performance followed back-to-back single-digit scoring games to close the regular season. Now those ineffective outings seem as if they transpired months ago, instead of occurring in the previous two-plus weeks.

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) and Kansas guard Malik Newman (14) slap hands during a KU run in the first half, Thursday, March 8, 2018 at Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo.

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) and Kansas guard Malik Newman (14) slap hands during a KU run in the first half, Thursday, March 8, 2018 at Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo. by Nick Krug

“I feel like I’m playing at a very high level,” Newman said. “That’s just thanks to my teammates and the coaching staff. Those guys had confidence in me throughout the year, no matter if I was at my lowest or at my highs. They’ve just always said, ‘Be aggressive and things are going to be fine.’ So credit to those guys for rallying around me and keeping me high.”

Similarly, De Sousa’s teammates always trusted he eventually would bloom and begin playing to the potential of a five-star prep prospect — even though he arrived in Lawrence during the middle of the campaign, in late December, as an early high school graduate.

“He’s been working so hard in practice,” Graham said of the 6-foot-9 backup forward, who played sparingly for KU in January and February, “and going through ups and downs. Learning all the plays in two months is extreme for him. He’s just been battling and it’s starting to pay off.”

Graham could see it coming. It just so happened everything began clicking for De Sousa when KU needed him most, with Azubuike out of the lineup in Kansas City, due to a left-knee injury. Even before De Sousa averaged 10 points and 9.7 rebounds at the Big 12 tournament, KU’s team leader witnessed the young big “grinding” at practices, arriving early and spending extra time studying video with assistant coach Norm Roberts.

Kansas forward Silvio De Sousa (22) dunks off of a lob jame during the first half, Saturday, March 10, 2018 at Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo.

Kansas forward Silvio De Sousa (22) dunks off of a lob jame during the first half, Saturday, March 10, 2018 at Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo. by Nick Krug

“At any point in time we knew he was going to have a breakout game, and it was the perfect time with Dok being out,” Graham added, “so his confidence should be high. Sky high.”

Newman left K.C. this past weekend impressed with De Sousa the player and the man, praising the freshman’s character and speaking of the way he seemed to respond to any and all adversity with a smile and positive attitude.

“Each day he just tried to learn. Whenever he messed up he would just go ask coach. ‘Coach, what do I need to be doing? Did I do this right?’ Things like that. We knew sooner or later he was gonna turn the corner,” Newman shared. “Not too long ago in the regular season I remember saying that Silvio, he was on the porch, but he’s not in the house yet, as far as him just being comfortable. But I think this tournament, I think it really helped him and let him know that we’ve got confidence in him to go out and play.”

De Sousa brought energy to KU’s frontcourt in the Big 12 championship game, and made impactful plays to help the Jayhawks win without their starting 7-footer, Azubuike. In doing so De Sousa looked completely different from the freshman whom coach Bill Self hesitated to keep checked into games for more than a minute or two as recently as a month ago.

“I’m not gonna lie, when I came here out of high school I knew it was going to be hard,” De Sousa said. “And I just believed in myself and just tried hard during practices. Now, months later, I’ve actually got my confidence up. Today I finally can play a lot better than I used to.”

When Azubuike returns to the floor, Graham thinks Kansas (27-7) will have an even more dynamic team to unleash in the NCAA Tournament, now that De Sousa has proven he can produce and play with confidence.

Whether March brought out the best in De Sousa and Newman or the emerging Jayhawks just have impeccable timing, Newman isn’t ruling out the idea of another KU player stepping to the forefront soon.

“Svi could’ve stepped up, Lagerald (Vick) could’ve stepped up and did what I did,” Newman said of carrying the offensive load this past weekend. “Or instead of Silvio playing how he played, Mitch (Lightfoot) could’ve played like that. I don’t think it’s just me and him. It was one man goes down, one man step up.”

— PODCAST | KU Sports Hour NCAA Tournament Preview —

Reply 3 comments from Surrealku Dirk Medema Dannyboy4hawks

KU guards can compensate for Udoka Azubuike’s absence by attacking glass

Kansas guard Malik Newman (14) and Kansas guard Lagerald Vick (2) fight for a rebound with TCU forward Kouat Noi (12) during the first half on Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas guard Malik Newman (14) and Kansas guard Lagerald Vick (2) fight for a rebound with TCU forward Kouat Noi (12) during the first half on Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

Kansas City, Mo. — This season’s Kansas basketball team is no stranger to getting beat on the glass. So the top-seeded Jayhawks should feel right at home this week at Sprint Center, where they will try and navigate the Big 12 tournament without injured 7-foot center Udoka Azubuike.

Without question, KU’s offense will miss the high-percentage shots Azubuike, out with a medial collateral ligament sprain, provides with regularity. But the Jayhawks also will look like a lesser version of themselves on the boards, because the sophomore big is the best rebounder on a team that oftentimes struggles to finish stops by securing an opponent’s missed shot.

A massive presence in the paint, Azubuike started every game for Kansas (24-7) this season up to this point, and led the team in rebounding 18 times.

KU won the rebound margin in three of its final four regular-season games — +13 versus Oklahoma, +7 vs. Texas and +7 at Oklahoma State. But the Jayhawks lost that battle in 15 of the 16 games that preceded their more successful stretch.

Against Power 5 competition this season (25 games), KU out-rebounded its opponent five times — the other two came against Arizona State and Kansas State.

So what does the team that finished 9th in the Big 12 in rebound margin (-2.9 a game) look like without its best rebounder? To try and get a sense of what to expect at the conference tournament, let’s look at a few of Azubuike’s less impactful games this season on the glass.

Occasionally, Azubuike, who averaged 7.1 boards on the year and 6.6 a game in league action, finished with 4 or fewer rebounds. That occurred four times during Big 12 play:

  • at TCU: 1 rebound in 13 minutes (fouled out); TCU scored 14 second-chance points — KU won 88-84

  • at Kansas State: 3 rebounds in 18 minutes; K-State scored 9 second-chance points — KU won 70-56

  • at Baylor: 4 rebounds in 19 minutes; BU scored 14 second-chance points — KU lost 80-64

  • at Iowa State: 3 rebounds in 22 minutes; ISU scored 10 second-chance points — KU won 83-77

Kansas forward Mitch Lightfoot (44) pulls a rebound from Oklahoma State forward Mitchell Solomon (41) during the second half, Saturday, March 3, 2018 at Gallagher-Iba Arena, in Stillwater, Okla.

Kansas forward Mitch Lightfoot (44) pulls a rebound from Oklahoma State forward Mitchell Solomon (41) during the second half, Saturday, March 3, 2018 at Gallagher-Iba Arena, in Stillwater, Okla. by Nick Krug

At TCU, Mitch Lightfoot (7 rebounds) and Marcus Garrett (6 boards) helped carry the load. At K-State, Malik Newman came through with 10 rebounds and Svi Mykhailiuk grabbed 7 more. At ISU, Newman and Devonte’ Graham tied for the team lead (6 apiece).

The Jayhawks lost at Baylor when no one stepped up to fill the void. Mykhailiuk, Newman and Lagerald Vick each finished with 4 boards.

KU’s rebounding numbers — and chances of advancing in the Big 12 tournament — will look a lot worse unless Azubuike’s teammates use his absence as incentive to really attack the glass.

“We’ve been a poor rebounding team by good rebounding team standards all year long,” KU coach Bill Self said Wednesday at Sprint Center.

It doesn’t sound as if Self is expecting Lightfoot and De Sousa to suddenly start rebounding like Cole Aldrich and Thomas Robinson.

“So we’re just going to have to have our guards rebound more,” Self said. “You know, Malik’s done a good job. Svi and Lagerald have got to become better rebounders probably as much as anyone.”

The numbers indicate Kansas should be able to count on Newman to get inside and clear some defensive rebounds. The 6-3 guard, per sports-reference.com, is KU’s second-most consistent rebounder on that end, gathering an estimated 15.6% of available defensive rebounds (Azubuike leads the team with a 20.2% defensive rebound percentage.)

Newman can look for some help on that end from Garrett (15.6%). Lightfoot enters the postseason with a 12.4% mark, while De Sousa, with far fewer minutes to give a better sense of his ceiling, owns a 12.3% defensive rebound percentage.

It’s unrealistic to expect any Jayhawks to match Azubuike’s offensive impact. But, chipping in as a committee of rebounders at Sprint Center will be necessary for them to get by without their game-changing center.


— Udoka Azubuike 2017-18 season game log —

Game Log Table
Date Opponent   MP FG FGA FG% ORB DRB TRB BLK PF PTS
2017-11-10Tennessee StateW3067.8572462213
2017-11-14KentuckyW34551.0005382313
2017-11-17South Dakota StateW2389.8890222217
2017-11-21Texas SouthernW27912.7502791220
2017-11-24OaklandW201016.62564102221
2017-11-28ToledoW2469.6670550212
2017-12-02SyracuseW23331.000189146
2017-12-06WashingtonL2356.8332792310
2017-12-10Arizona StateL2267.8573692213
2017-12-16NebraskaW261317.76555101326
2017-12-18Nebraska-OmahaW2257.714210122111
2017-12-21StanfordW261215.8004372324
2017-12-29TexasW29611.54567130313
2018-01-02Texas TechL2846.6673471311
2018-01-06Texas ChristianW13661.0000110514
2018-01-09Iowa StateW2945.800156439
2018-01-13Kansas StateW3289.8894485118
2018-01-15West VirginiaW20551.0002791510
2018-01-20BaylorW3458.6254371214
2018-01-23OklahomaL2245.800336049
2018-01-27Texas A&MW2248.500336438
2018-01-29Kansas StateW18221.000123036
2018-02-03Oklahoma StateL21811.7273250420
2018-02-06Texas ChristianW25610.60038112316
2018-02-10BaylorL19441.000224148
2018-02-13Iowa StateW22910.9000333419
2018-02-17West VirginiaW3178.8753253321
2018-02-19OklahomaW1856.8332683310
2018-02-24Texas TechW2934.750167336
2018-02-26TexasW211011.9092685220
2018-03-03Oklahoma StateL2046.667257048
31 Games753192248.774771432205591426
Provided by CBB at Sports Reference: View Original Table
Generated 3/7/2018.



Reply 6 comments from Zabudda Kurt Eskilson Titus Canby Allan Olson Surrealku Andrew Ralls

Jayhawks looking for a Malik Newman resurgence just in time for the postseason

Kansas guard Malik Newman (14) gets a shot off as he is fouled by Kansas State forward Makol Mawien (14) during the second half, Monday, Jan. 29, 2018 at Bramlage Coliseum in Manhattan, Kan. At left is Kansas State guard Mike McGuirl (00).

Kansas guard Malik Newman (14) gets a shot off as he is fouled by Kansas State forward Makol Mawien (14) during the second half, Monday, Jan. 29, 2018 at Bramlage Coliseum in Manhattan, Kan. At left is Kansas State guard Mike McGuirl (00). by Nick Krug

Less than two weeks ago Kansas basketball coach Bill Self, while discussing a recent uptick in Malik Newman’s play, stated how proud he was of the starting guard’s progress.

The sophomore transfer from Mississippi State was coming off one of his best offensive showings as a Jayhawk, going for 20 points and 5 assists in a rout of Oklahoma. It was Newman’s third time posting at least 20 points and ninth time in double figures over a stretch of 10 games.

Even more encouraging, the 6-foot-3 guard from Jackson, Miss., looked better handling the ball. Newman had shown he could be more than a spot-up 3-point shooter by driving to the paint to either draw contact, score or set up teammates. In a five-game span that concluded with the OU game on Feb. 19, Newman averaged 4.2 assists and 0.6 turnovers — far better than his current season averages of 2.1 assists and 1.5 turnovers.

While Self appreciates the headway Newman has made to become a more complete player than what he showed back in the non-conference portion of the schedule and Self is happy the shooting guard won the Big 12’s Newcomer of the Year award, KU’s coach is hoping for a Newman resurgence with the postseason’s arrival.

In the Jayhawks’ final three games of the regular season, Newman, who is supposed to complement Big 12 Player of the Year Devonte’ Graham in the backcourt, didn’t always deliver on his potential, and his numbers began trending in the wrong direction.

At Texas Tech, Newman was solid, with 12 points and 5 defensive rebounds, but he made just 1 assist (in the first half) — his lowest ball distribution total in three weeks — and committed 1 turnover. Against Texas in KU’s home finale, Newman provided 9 points, 4 defensive boards and 1 assist, with 1 turnover. He bottomed out in the Jayhawks’ loss at Oklahoma State, with 7 points, 3 defensive rebounds, 0 assists and 3 cough-ups.

After averaging 4.2 free-throw attempts a game in the previous 12 contests, Newman didn’t get to the foul line once in his final two games of the regular season.

“I think he's shown flashes of being, of showing a lot of progress,” Self said of Newman, who averaged 12.9 points, 4.9 rebounds and 1.8 assists in Big 12 play, while shooting 43.4% from the field and making 33 of 88 3-pointers (37.5%). “And then I honestly think he's shown flashes of not. I would like more consistency.”


Game Log Table
Date Opponent   MP FG FGA FG% 3P 3PA 3P% FT FTA FT% DRB TRB AST TOV PTS
2017-11-10Tennessee StateW2458.62524.50000442412
2017-11-14KentuckyW33414.28626.333221.000892112
2017-11-17South Dakota StateW2647.57124.500331.000002013
2017-11-21Texas SouthernW2749.44446.66700343212
2017-11-24OaklandW3159.55613.333441.000663315
2017-11-28ToledoW28710.700111.000221.000332017
2017-12-02SyracuseW3418.12506.0000035532
2017-12-06WashingtonL2936.50024.5000044218
2017-12-10Arizona StateL33512.41738.37500552213
2017-12-16NebraskaW3106.00003.0000056220
2017-12-18Nebraska-OmahaW26610.60026.33300444214
2017-12-21StanfordW3237.42913.3330067207
2017-12-29TexasW29410.40014.25045.800450213
2018-01-02Texas TechL2148.50002.000111.00033029
2018-01-06Texas ChristianW1502.00001.00012.50000011
2018-01-09Iowa StateW341021.476513.38523.667882127
2018-01-13Kansas StateW3226.33313.333221.00034117
2018-01-15West VirginiaW2729.22214.25046.66746039
2018-01-20BaylorW35711.63634.750771.000672224
2018-01-23OklahomaL37712.58335.600331.000451120
2018-01-27Texas A&MW37613.46227.28613.333671115
2018-01-29Kansas StateW4037.42913.33367.85710103213
2018-02-03Oklahoma StateL3449.44435.60056.833550116
2018-02-06Texas ChristianW3319.11105.000221.00066504
2018-02-10BaylorL32516.313210.200221.000445014
2018-02-13Iowa StateW35610.60025.40034.750664217
2018-02-17West VirginiaW31310.30027.28634.750342111
2018-02-19OklahomaW37711.63646.667221.000335020
2018-02-24Texas TechW2936.50034.75034.750551112
2018-02-26TexasW2849.44414.2500044119
2018-03-03Oklahoma StateL2337.42913.3330033037
31 Games943128292.43855149.3696274.8381381526445373
Provided by CBB at Sports Reference: View Original Table
Generated 3/6/2018.

Newman needs to revive the versatility that made him so valuable in late January and most of February now that it’s March. Newman has stated a number of times how important it is for he and other Jayhawks to help take some of the burden off Graham’s shoulders.

If Newman wants to make that happen on a regular basis in the weeks ahead, he can just recall some of Graham’s advice. The senior point guard said when Newman was at his best recently it was all about taking an assertive approach on offense and trying to reach the paint off the bounce.

“I keep telling him that,” Graham related. “Just look to score. Don’t worry about nothing else. Because once you start thinking you just get all messed up. So just look to score, be aggressive on the offensive end and it just takes care of itself.”

Kansas guard Malik Newman (14) puts up a shot after a foul from Iowa State guard Donovan Jackson (4) during the first half, Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018 at Hilton Coliseum in Ames, Iowa.

Kansas guard Malik Newman (14) puts up a shot after a foul from Iowa State guard Donovan Jackson (4) during the first half, Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018 at Hilton Coliseum in Ames, Iowa. by Nick Krug

Just more than half of Newman’s shot attempts this season have come from behind the arc. A 36.9% 3-point shooter on the year (37.5% in Big 12 action), spotting up isn’t always Newman’s best play. When he is more diverse with the ball in his hands, it tends to benefit both him and his teammates.

Plus, Self wants Newman contributing in less trackable manners. As you might expect, those areas where the coach would like to see more consistency directly tie to relieving Graham of some of his duties. KU’s 15th-year coach finds himself examining what Newman does on a game-by-game basis to help Graham.

“I’d love to see Malik be able to say, ‘I want to guard the other team's best perimeter player.’ I would love to see us be able to initiate offense with Malik, so Devonte' doesn't have to,” Self said. “And those don't have anything to do with stats, but those are things that would help our team a tremendous amount. He's shown he can do that, but I think he can be more consistent with that.”

Newman’s first crack at a late-season renaissance comes Thursday in Kansas City, Mo., when the top-seeded Jayhawks face either Oklahoma or Oklahoma State.

Reply 7 comments from Plasticjhawk Benton Smith Drew425 Len Shaffer Surrealku Matthew Roesner Dillon Davis

5 stats that popped from KU’s Sunflower Showdown road victory

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) rolls through a pick as he defends Kansas State guard Barry Brown (5) during the first half, Monday, Jan. 29, 2018 at Bramlage Coliseum in Manhattan, Kan.

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) rolls through a pick as he defends Kansas State guard Barry Brown (5) during the first half, Monday, Jan. 29, 2018 at Bramlage Coliseum in Manhattan, Kan. by Nick Krug

Kansas maintained its spot atop the Big 12 standings Monday night by catching rival Kansas State off guard with some zone defense in a 70-56 road victory.

The Jayhawks (18-4 overall, 7-2 Big 12) could have fallen into a tie for first place with the Wildcats (16-6, 5-4) had K-State successfully defended its home floor.

Instead, KU hit the midway point of the conference schedule in a familiar position — with the rest of the Big 12 looking up at the perennial champion.

Here are five statistics from the Jayhawks’ latest Sunflower Showdown victory that stood out.

Defending the ’Cats

K-State had a chance to beat Kansas in Allen Fieldlhouse earlier this month because the Wildcats shot 49 percent from the field and went 13-for-26 in the second half.

The Jayhawks didn’t allow their rivals to get so comfortable in the rematch. K-State converted just 21 of 65 shots in the home loss, as KU came away with its second-best field goal percentage defense of the season, 32.3 percent. It was also the second-worst shooting performance for K-State.

Although junior Dean Wade still put up 20 points, KU did enough to get Wade, a 56.6-percent shooter on the season, to miss 10 of his 18 shots.

Barry Brown’s tear through the Big 12 hit a major bump, too, as KU became the first conference opponent to limit him to single digits, with 9. Brown, the second-leading scorer in league play (21.2 points per game), shot 4-for-16 and only got to the foul line for one free-throw attempt.

K-State’s 56 points were the second-fewest by a KU opponent this season.

The streak is over

Not the Jayhawks’ run of Big 12 titles, of course. That streak looks like it could reach 14 in the weeks to come. Actually, KU put an end to an unattractive slump Monday in Manhattan.

In each of the 10 games before it, Kansas players gathered fewer rebounds than their foes. The skid ended at K-State with the Jayhawks securing 41 boards to their rivals’ 31. The importance of that tally wasn’t lost on seniors Svi Mykhailiuk and Devonte’ Graham when they spotted it on the post-game box score.

None by Tom Martin

KU’s offense — in good ways and bad — actually helped make the winning rebound margin possible. The Jayhawks’ 14-for-20 shooting in the first half meant there weren’t many misses available for the Wildcats. Same goes for KU’s 12 turnovers — no shot attempt, no chance at a rebound. As a result, Kansas out-boarded K-State, 22-12, in the first half, when the home team only had 8 defensive rebounds.

The Jayhawks drew even on the glass in the second half, allowing them to maintain the big margin.

Malik Newman’s career-high 10 rebounds led the team, while Mykhailiuk grabbed seven and Mitch Lightfoot added five off the bench in 20 minutes.

The +10 differential in KU’s favor put an end to the longest rebound-margin losing streak in the Bill Self era.

Double-double backcourt

Kansas guard Malik Newman (14) runs the ball up the court past Kansas State forward Xavier Sneed (20) during the second half, Monday, Jan. 29, 2018 at Bramlage Coliseum in Manhattan, Kan.

Kansas guard Malik Newman (14) runs the ball up the court past Kansas State forward Xavier Sneed (20) during the second half, Monday, Jan. 29, 2018 at Bramlage Coliseum in Manhattan, Kan. by Nick Krug

The 2017-18 KU roster doesn’t feature the type of double-double frontcourt players that highlighted teams of years past.

However, KU’s backcourt proved it can put up big numbers in multiple categories, as well. Both Graham (16 points, 11 assists) and Newman (13 points, 10 rebounds) achieved double-doubles at K-State.

It was the first such achievement of Newman’s career and the third for Graham (every one coming this season).

All of their Kansas teammates combined have posted nine double-doubles over the course of their college careers. Udoka Azubuike leads the way with five. The big man’s most recent one came at Texas in the Big 12 opener (13 points, 13 rebounds).

Graham and Newman became the first KU teammates to record double-doubles in the same game since Landen Lucas and Kelly Oubre Jr. (2015).

De Sousa still playing catchup

Self, since freshman forward Silvio De Sousa arrived on campus in late December, has pointed to early February as the first time the Jayhawks will really know what kind of team they have. Self said that because he knew De Sousa’s assimilation from the high school game to the Big 12 would not be easy. It would inevitably take time for the freshman big man to adjust to everything.

Kansas will play its first February game on Saturday against Oklahoma State (11 a.m. tip-off, CBS). And De Sousa still has a long way to go before making a real impact.

The 6-foot-9, 245-pound forward logged only 2 minutes Monday at Kansas State, contributing nothing statistically — unless you count his 1 foul and 1 turnover.

Twenty seconds after checking into the game in the first half, De Sousa didn’t get out to the perimeter in time to defend a successful Wade 3-pointer.

Next, in a less-than-20-second span, De Sousa turned the ball over and fouled Wade as the K-State veteran scored on the first-semester Jayhawk.

De Sousa might have the size and tools to give Kansas more in a few weeks, but he isn’t there yet.

Disparity in shot attempts

It’s a good thing the Jayhawks came through with one of their better defensive efforts, because K-State attempted 19 more shots than the visitors.

Kansas was not just better defensively than the Wildcats on the night, it had a far more effective offense, too. While both teams made 21 field goals, KU did it on 46 attempts and K-State put up 65.

Various factors led to the discrepancy: KU’s 16 turnovers to K-State’s 7; K-State’s 11 offensive rebounds to KU’s 7; the Jayhawks shot 26 free throws, while the Wildcats only attempted 11.

But the bottom line was Kansas made the most of its possessions, scoring on 31 of its 67 (46.3%). K-State came away with points on 25 of its 66 possessions (37.9%). And the Jayhawks did it while posting season-lows in both field goals made (21) and attempted (46).







More news and notes from Kansas vs. Kansas State


By the Numbers: Kansas 70, Kansas State 56

By the Numbers: Kansas 70, Kansas State 56

Reply 3 comments from Surrealku Bradley Sitz Sasquatch2310

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