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5 stats that popped for Kansas in an OT win over Duke that sent KU to the Final Four

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) celebrates a Jayhawk run during the second half, Sunday, March 25, 2018 at CenturyLink Center in Omaha, Neb.

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) celebrates a Jayhawk run during the second half, Sunday, March 25, 2018 at CenturyLink Center in Omaha, Neb. by Nick Krug

The Kansas basketball season isn’t over yet.

The Jayhawks advanced out of the NCAA Tournament’s Midwest region and on to San Antonio by knocking off Duke, in overtime, 85-81, Sunday night.

“Mr. March,” also known as Malik Newman, had plenty to do with KU’s 31st and most memorable victory of the year so far, scoring all 13 of his team’s points in OT.

But the efforts of Newman’s teammates in various other categories proved just as valuable. Here are five statistics that made the Jayhawks’ 15th Final Four appearance, and first since 2012, possible.

Second-chance points

Given KU’s one-big, four-guard lineup and the presence of two potential NBA lottery picks in Duke’s starting frontcourt, it seemed a long night of Marvin Bagley III and Wendell Carter Jr. snagging Blue Devils misses could be in the cards for Kansas.

However, Duke only secured 10 offensive rebounds off 40 missed field goals, finishing with just 11 second-chance points.

KU had come up short in second-chance points in four of its first six postseason victories before outscoring Duke, 15-11, with the help of 17 offensive boards.

Starting center Udoka Azubuike enhanced those numbers with 5 offensive rebounds — his second-best total this season.

Guards Svi Mykhailiuk (3 offensive rebounds), Devonte’ Graham (2), Newman (2) and Marcus Garrett (2) all chipped in when they could, as well.

Late-game stops

Kansas guard Malik Newman (14) defends against Duke guard Grayson Allen (3) during the second half, Sunday, March 25, 2018 at CenturyLink Center in Omaha, Neb.

Kansas guard Malik Newman (14) defends against Duke guard Grayson Allen (3) during the second half, Sunday, March 25, 2018 at CenturyLink Center in Omaha, Neb. by Nick Krug

Whether it was KU locking in, Duke’s legs wearing down or some combination of the two, the Jayhawks spent the final minutes of regulation making stops.

After Grayson Allen fed Wendell Carter Jr. for a layup with 4:25 to go in the second half, KU held Duke without a basket and forced a turnover in the final four minutes, setting up overtime.

Although Allen made two free throws at the 1:59 and 1:25 marks, Kansas barely out-scored Duke, 5-4, during the closing minutes of the second half.

Lagerald Vick blocked Carter with 3:51 on the clock. Azubuike rebounded a missed 3 by Allen with 3:23 left. Trevon Duval turned the ball over at the 2:40 mark. Silvio De Sousa rebounded a Carter misfire with 36 seconds to go in regulation. And KU’s March breakout star, Newman, successfully defended a potential Allen game-winner with 0:03 showing on the clock.

3-point defense

Duke guard Gary Trent Jr. (2) puts up a three over Kansas guard Lagerald Vick (2) during the second half, Sunday, March 25, 2018 at CenturyLink Center in Omaha, Neb.

Duke guard Gary Trent Jr. (2) puts up a three over Kansas guard Lagerald Vick (2) during the second half, Sunday, March 25, 2018 at CenturyLink Center in Omaha, Neb. by Nick Krug

KU knew headed into the Elite Eight showdown that Allen (100 of 267 on 3-pointers, 37.5%) and Gary Trent Jr. (95 of 231, 41.1%) were Duke’s best long-range shooters.

The Jayhawks’ perimeter defenders made sure neither Allen (2 of 9 on 3’s versus KU) or Trent (2 of 10) got hot or found a rhythm.

With the Devils’ marksmen combining to hit just 21% of their 3-pointers, Duke only made 7 of 29 (24%) as a team — the lowest percentage by a KU opponent in the NCAA Tournament this March.

3-point shooting

Kansas guard Lagerald Vick (2) celebrates a three during the second half, Sunday, March 25, 2018 at CenturyLink Center in Omaha, Neb.

Kansas guard Lagerald Vick (2) celebrates a three during the second half, Sunday, March 25, 2018 at CenturyLink Center in Omaha, Neb. by Nick Krug

A season-long ally for the Jayhawks, the 3-point line once again facilitated a Kansas victory.

It wasn’t KU’s 36% success from beyond the arc that made the difference. It was that 39 points (nearly half of the victor’s 85) came from that source.

Kansas hit 13 of 36 from deep between its four starting guards, giving the team 13 or more 3-pointers for the eighth time this season and 10 or more for the 19th occasion in 38 outings.

The Jayhawks out-scored Duke by 18 points from outside the arc, and improved to 17-2 when connecting on at least 10 3-pointers.

Newman went 5 for 12. Mykhailiuk sent the game to OT with a 3-pointer in the final 30 seconds of regulation and made 3 of 9. Graham hit 3 of 8. Vick made at least two from deep for the fifth straight game, connecting on 2 of 7.

26 minutes from De Sousa

Kansas forward Silvio De Sousa (22) blocks a shot by Duke guard Gary Trent Jr. (2) during the second half, Sunday, March 25, 2018 at CenturyLink Center in Omaha, Neb.

Kansas forward Silvio De Sousa (22) blocks a shot by Duke guard Gary Trent Jr. (2) during the second half, Sunday, March 25, 2018 at CenturyLink Center in Omaha, Neb. by Nick Krug

Where would the Jayhawkw be without freshman big man De Sousa right now? Maybe done for the season, instead of packing up for a trip to San Antonio.

With starting center Azubuike battling foul trouble all night — he picked up his fifth and a disqualification with 1:59 to play in the second half — KU needed every minute, rebound, hustle play and defensive stop De Sousa could muster. http://www2.kusports.com/news/2018/ma...

A 6-foot-9 freshman from Angola, De Sousa tied a career high with 26 minutes — the same time he spent on the court in the Big 12 title game, when Azubuike was out with an injury.

The backup big, whom Bill Self barely trusted to keep on the floor in January and February, finished with 4 points, 10 rebounds, 1 assist and 1 block.

After Azubuike fouled out during crunch time, with the season on the line, De Sousa finished off three separate KU stops with a defensive rebound.

His first-half dunk and second-half layup helped KU’s bench out-score the Duke subs, 8-6.


More news and notes from Kansas vs. Duke


By the Numbers: Kansas 85, Duke 81.

By the Numbers: Kansas 85, Duke 81.

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Driving and dishing Devonte’ Graham vital to KU’s 3-point-shooting success

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) pushes the ball to the wing past West Virginia guard Jevon Carter (2) and West Virginia forward Esa Ahmad (23) during the first half, Saturday, March 10, 2018 at Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo.

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) pushes the ball to the wing past West Virginia guard Jevon Carter (2) and West Virginia forward Esa Ahmad (23) during the first half, Saturday, March 10, 2018 at Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo. by Nick Krug

The offensive lifeblood of a four-guard lineup, 3-pointers — sometimes just the mere threat of them — space the floor for Kansas, give 7-footer Udoka Azubuike space to dominate on touches in the paint and have helped make a third consecutive trip to the Sweet 16 possible.

Of their 81.4 points per game this year, the Jayhawks average 30.1 from behind the arc (22nd in Division I). In other words, their opponents know KU’s guards would like nothing more than to drown them in a deluge of 3-pointers.

With foes doing everything within their powers to limit one of this Kansas team’s most effective weapons, timing and precision are vital for getting the best look at the basket possible while rising up from long range. Within an offense that revolves around ball screens, dribble hand-offs and drive-and-kicks it sure helps to have senior point guard Devonte’ Graham penetrating and distributing.

Among the 16 teams still alive in the NCAA Tournament, Graham’s 7.5 assists per game on the season lead all players. While plenty of those dimes come on fast breaks or alley-oops for KU bigs, the guards who play alongside Graham are thankful his kick-out passes allow them to consistently catch and shoot in one fluid motion.

So what percentage of Graham’s deliveries to 3-point shooters are perfect?

Junior Lagerald Vick briefly paused to calculate before responding, with a grin: “I would say about 99.7 of those are right on the money. I definitely think he’s a good passer, especially off penetration and kick.”

A more generous grader, senior Svi Mykhailiuk went ahead and gave Graham a 100.

“I think every time,” Mykhailiuk said. “He knows where I’m going to be and he just passes to me and I’m gonna make a shot.”

Kansas guard Malik Newman (14) puts up a three from the corner over Penn guard Antonio Woods (2) during the first half, Thursday, March 15, 2018 at Intrust Bank Arena in Wichita, Kan.

Kansas guard Malik Newman (14) puts up a three from the corner over Penn guard Antonio Woods (2) during the first half, Thursday, March 15, 2018 at Intrust Bank Arena in Wichita, Kan. by Nick Krug

In KU’s second-round victory over Seton Hall, Graham didn’t have his typical shooting touch, but he assisted on 4 of his team’s 9 successful 3-pointers.

Two days earlier, the Jayhawks only made 7 from deep while defeating Penn. Graham assisted on three and made two 3-pointers.

Per Synergy Sports, Kansas has averaged 17.76 points in its first two NCAA Tournament victories off Graham assists alone — 2.4 points for every dish that sets up a basket.

None by Synergy Sports Tech

Playing to his roster’s strengths, coach Bill Self has the Jayhawks (29-7) run a lot of ball-screen offense. While Graham is a strong 3-point shooter (his 40.4% accuracy ranks 60th in the country), it often falls on the lead guard to make sure senior Mykhailiuk (45.5%, 10th nationally), sophomore Malik Newman (40.9%) and Vick (37.8%) get the ball in advantageous situations once he begins attacking off the dribble.

“You’ve got to make the defense commit to you and I’ve got to find my guys for open shots,” Graham said.

Occasionally, every step of the process comes easily. On one possession against Penn, Graham turned the corner off a Mitch Lightfoot ball screen, drove to the paint and hit Vick, spotting up nearby in the right corner, for a perfect look.

Other times, Graham has to get more crafty.

In one second-half sequence versus Seton Hall, Graham dribbled left off a pick from Azubuike, drawing the attention of four Pirates defenders as he made his way into the paint. Their resulting rotation accounted for Vick in the right corner, which is where his opponents assumed Graham would look.

Instead he bounced a pass through a gap in the defense, all the way out to the right wing for a wide-open Newman 3-pointer.

Of course, Graham knows how to set up teammates for 3-pointers in every way imaginable.

While facing Penn, Graham misfired on a floater he released in the paint. When the ball rimmed out and found its way back to his hands for an offensive rebound, a little court awareness and quick improvisation paid off.

Graham knew where Vick was when he released his shot, so he easily kicked the ball out to his teammate near the left corner upon securing the rebound. Making the best of his circumstances, the point guard’s hustle set up an easy 3-pointer.

“He’s been a pretty good passer since I’ve known him, even when I came my freshman year when he was at the 2,” Vick said, referring to Graham’s days playing with Frank Mason III. “He’s a good passer.”

Graham’s recognition and vision prove valuable in transition, as well. Off a defensive rebound against Seton Hall, with nine players in front of him on the court, Graham knew KU had the spacing on the break for Newman to get an open 3-pointer on the left wing.

The senior point guard also trusted the shot would drop, raising his hands into the air to signal a successful 3 as Newman went into his shooting motion.

Graham’s familiarity with his fellow guards leads to such trust — as well as to so many accurate passes.

“Just playing with them, game experience, knowing where they like the ball at,” Graham said of how his passes so often generate 3-pointers, “and just tying to get it to them where they can just catch and shoot it before the defense goes out.”

Ahead of Friday’s Sweet 16 showdown with Clemson, in Omaha, Neb. (6:07 p.m., CBS), Vick, Mykhailiuk and Newman have combined to make 13 of 26 3-pointers in the tournament. Vick said their confidence as shooters is growing as a result, “especially with the big fella (Azubuike) back.”

Although Graham missed all four of his 3-point tries against Seton Hall after making 3 of 8 in the first round, his fellow guards have him to thank for much of their offensive impact.

“I would just say he knows how to play,” Mykhailiuk said, “and knows how to pass. He’s been doing this his whole life, so I guess he’s pretty good at it.”

Reply 4 comments from Harlan Hobbs Plasticjhawk Brian_leslie

5 stats that popped for Kansas in a Big 12 title game victory over West Virginia

Kansas forward Silvio De Sousa (22) finishes a lob jam against West Virginia guard Jevon Carter (2) during the first half, Saturday, March 10, 2018 at Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo.

Kansas forward Silvio De Sousa (22) finishes a lob jam against West Virginia guard Jevon Carter (2) during the first half, Saturday, March 10, 2018 at Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo. by Nick Krug

Kansas City, Mo. — Just as West Virginia learned twice during the regular season against eventual Big 12 champion Kansas, the Jayhawks can be a difficult team to put away.

The Mountaineers didn’t establish a double-digit lead against KU like they did in their previous two meetings, but WVU once again couldn’t shut down a hot Kansas offense late in the second half of Saturday’s Big 12 title game.

The Jayhawks, who trailed by as many as eight in the second half, beat West Virginia, 81-70, to capture KU’s 15th conference tournament championship overall and 11th in the Big 12.

Here are five statistics that drove a victory that almost certainly cemented Kansas as a No. 1 seed in the 2018 NCAA Tournament.

De Sousa key to 1st-half stretch run

Silvio De Sousa — the same player coach Bill Self didn’t trust enough to put on the court the last time Kansas squared off with West Virginia — was the only Jayhawk in uniform who could score inside most of the first half.

As West Virginia spent more than 11 minutes before halftime with the lead, the Jayhawks weren’t finding many chances for quality looks at the basket unless they came on 3-pointers.

Enter suddenly-super sub De Sousa.

When the 6-foot-9 freshman from Angola checked in with 14:49 to go until halftime, KU had 2 points in the paint. It turned out De Sousa was the only Jayhawk who could get the job done, as he proceeded to score 10 of KU’s 12 points in the paint before the break.

De Sousa shot 5 for 5 in 13 first-half minutes with two tip-ins, two slam dunks and a layup. His teammates combined to make 4 of 10 attempts at the rim.

By the end of De Sousa’s perfect 8-for-8 shooting night he accounted for 16 of KU’s 24 points in the paint.

Red-hot second half

It seemed as if every shot KU put up at Sprint Center in the second half was going to end up dropping through the net.

The Jayhawks made their first three shot attempts out of halftime, including a 3-pointer each for Svi Mykhailiuk and Lagerald Vick. And even though the next few minutes featured a 1-for-4 stretch with two missed layups, the Kansas offense exploded soon after.

KU connected on 14 of its final 18 field-goal attempts en route to 72-percent shooting in the final 20 minutes. It was the fourth time this season the Jayhawks shot 70 percent or better in a half, and what a half in which to pull it off again, with the Big 12’s postseason championship up for grabs.

Senior leader Devonte’ Graham put on quite a show, hitting 6 of 7 shots in the decisive stretch. But his supporting cast was nearly as effective. De Sousa (3 of 3) didn’t miss, and both Newman and Vick shot 3 for 4.

As a result, KU poured in 48 second-half points and finished the victory with a 56.4 field-goal percentage. The Jayhawks are 13-0 this year when reaching the 50-percent mark.

Power of the 3-ball (again)

Kansas guard Malik Newman (14) puts up a three from the corner over West Virginia guard Jevon Carter (2) during the second half, Saturday, March 10, 2018 at Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo.

Kansas guard Malik Newman (14) puts up a three from the corner over West Virginia guard Jevon Carter (2) during the second half, Saturday, March 10, 2018 at Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo. by Nick Krug

As important as their 3-pointers were against Kansas State the night before at the Big 12 tournament, the Jayhawks inflicted far more damage on WVU in the championship game from long distance.

KU’s four starting guards combined to bury 15 of 26 3-pointers, meaning the regular-season and postseason Big 12 champions scored 56% of their points from beyond the arc against West Virginia.

In three days at the league tournament, Kansas made 34 shots from long range — the most 3-pointers by a team that only played three games in Big 12 tournament history. (Oklahoma State made 35 over four games in 1999.)

KU improved to 15-2 this season when making at least 10 shots from 3-point range.

Crunch-time rebounding

Although West Virginia hurt Kansas much of the night with its offensive rebounding, gathering 17 of its own misses for 14 second-chance points, the Jayhawks proved much more diligent on the glass when it mattered most.

When Sagaba Konate scored a second-chance bucket with 9:37 to play, it pushed the WVU lead to 63-56. However, the Jayhawks only allowed the Mountaineers to secure one more offensive rebound on 11 missed shots the rest of the way.

De Sousa (3 defensive boards in the final 9:00), Newman (3), Vick (2) and Mykhailiuk (1), cleaned the glass in crunch time, as West Virginia failed to score another second-chance point.

Graham smooth under pressure

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) pushes the ball to the wing past West Virginia guard Jevon Carter (2) and West Virginia forward Esa Ahmad (23) during the first half, Saturday, March 10, 2018 at Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo.

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) pushes the ball to the wing past West Virginia guard Jevon Carter (2) and West Virginia forward Esa Ahmad (23) during the first half, Saturday, March 10, 2018 at Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo. by Nick Krug

Although, as usual, Graham played 40 minutes and owned far more ball-handling responsibilities than any of his teammates, the senior point guard only committed two turnovers against the always-assertive WVU defense, while also supplying a career-high 13 assists.

In 120 minutes this season versus the Mountaineers and two-time Big 12 Defensive Player of the Year Jevon Carter, Graham turned the ball over 7 times and assisted on 26 of his teammate’s baskets.

The Jayhawks’ senior point guard set a new Big 12 title game record with his 13 assists against WVU, as well.







By the Numbers: Kansas 81, West Virginia 70

By the Numbers: Kansas 81, West Virginia 70

Reply 3 comments from Brian_leslie Dannyboy4hawks Surrealku

5 stats that popped for Kansas in dreadful close to regular season

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) pulls up for a three against Oklahoma State guard Kendall Smith (1) during the second half, Saturday, March 3, 2018 at Gallagher-Iba Arena, in Stillwater, Okla.

Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) pulls up for a three against Oklahoma State guard Kendall Smith (1) during the second half, Saturday, March 3, 2018 at Gallagher-Iba Arena, in Stillwater, Okla. by Nick Krug

The Big 12 champions didn’t strike any fear into the hearts of the Oklahoma State Cowboys Saturday at Gallagher-Iba Arena.

In an 82-64 defeat, its worst of the season, No. 6-ranked Kansas proved once again it doesn’t match up well with OSU, which became the first Big 12 team to sweep Bill Self during his 15 years leading the Jayhawks.

Here are five statistics that contributed to the Jayhawks’ troublesome dud of a regular-season finale.

Where’s the support?

Not even Devonte’ Graham, the Big 12’s Player of the Year, can be expected to do it all every single game. So it’s hard to knock the senior point guard for an off shooting performance (4 of 14) at OSU.

How about a little help for the guy? Graham led Kansas with 15 points, but not one other Jayhawk reached double figures. It was the first time this season KU didn’t benefit from multiple double-digit scorers.

When KU lost at Allen Fieldhouse to this same Oklahoma State team a month ago, four different players put up 16 or more points.

Previously, Kansas (24-7 overall, 13-5 Big 12) had three or more players contribute 10 or more points in all but two games. KU only got double-digit points from two players in losses to Washington and Baylor.

It’s not as if this is a deep rotation capable of spreading the offensive wealth. Self relies on five starters and two bench regulars, and sometimes calls upon freshman big Silvio De Sousa. The scoring has to come from not only Graham, but also Svi Mykhailiuk, Udoka Azubuike and Malik Newman, all of whom are averaging more than 12 points a game in Big 12 play.

3-point disparity

Shooting from beyond the 3-point arc tends to be one of the Jayhawks’ best weapons, but on Saturday the Cowboys (18-13, 8-10) out-performed the Big 12 champs from long range.

Oklahoma State made more 3-pointers than Kansas and shot a higher percentage from deep. The Jayhawks finished on the wrong end of both categories in the same game for the seventh time this season.

Kansas fell to 3-4 when being out-scored and out-shot from 3-point range. Below are the totals and percentages from those outcomes.

  • Washington: 9 of 21, 42.9% | KU: 5 of 20, 25% (UW win)

  • Nebraska: 8 of 22, 36.4% | KU: 7 of 22, 31.8% (Kansas win)

  • Oklahoma State: 12 of 27, 44.4% | KU: 8 of 22, 36.4% (OSU win on Feb. 3)

  • TCU: 10 of 25, 40% | KU: 7 of 21, 33.3% (Kansas win)

  • Baylor: 8 of 15, 53.3% | KU: 6 of 31, 19.4% (BU win)

  • West Virginia: 14 of 26, 53.8% | KU: 7 of 22, 31.8% (Kansas win)

  • Oklahoma State: 10 of 24, 41.7% | KU: 7 of 20, 35% (OSU win on March 3)

Somewhat troubling for Kansas, five of these occurrences came in the final nine games of the regular season.

Not much of a fight

Oklahoma State forward Mitchell Solomon (41) explodes between Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) and Kansas center Udoka Azubuike (35) after a dunk and a Kansas foul during the first half, Saturday, March 3, 2018 at Gallagher-Iba Arena, in Stillwater, Okla.

Oklahoma State forward Mitchell Solomon (41) explodes between Kansas guard Devonte' Graham (4) and Kansas center Udoka Azubuike (35) after a dunk and a Kansas foul during the first half, Saturday, March 3, 2018 at Gallagher-Iba Arena, in Stillwater, Okla. by Nick Krug

Most games swing back and forth at least a little bit in terms of momentum. The home team starts hot. The visitors respond. The home team counters. We’ve all seen it before.

Saturday’s KU-OSU matchup mostly lacked such distinct runs and comebacks — at least for the Jayhawks.

The Cowboys’ Mitchell Solomon scored the game’s first basket in the second minute of the first half and Oklahoma State led for the remaining 38:25, marking the second time this season Kansas failed to take a lead in a game. The other occasion was in KU’s Jan. 2 home loss to Texas Tech.

The Jayhawks’ largest spurt of the entire debacle came in the first half, when an Azubuike dunk, a Marcus Garrett layup and a Graham 3-pointer provided the visitors, already down 10 less than seven minutes in, with a 7-0 spark.

The Cowboys answered with a 13-0 run over the next three-plus minutes, pushing their lead to 16.

Late in the second half, OSU extended its margin to 23 points, the largest deficit Kansas has faced all season.

Ball security

Kansas forward Silvio De Sousa (22) and Kansas guard Lagerald Vick (2) tangle with Oklahoma State forward Yankuba Sima (35) for a loose ball during the first half, Saturday, March 3, 2018 at Gallagher-Iba Arena, in Stillwater, Okla.

Kansas forward Silvio De Sousa (22) and Kansas guard Lagerald Vick (2) tangle with Oklahoma State forward Yankuba Sima (35) for a loose ball during the first half, Saturday, March 3, 2018 at Gallagher-Iba Arena, in Stillwater, Okla. by Nick Krug

In Big 12 play this year, Kansas averaged 11.5 turnovers a game, the lowest mark among the league’s 10 teams.

However, Oklahoma State feasted on KU miscues. The Cowboys’ 11 steals were the most by a KU opponent in any game this season. The Jayhawks committed 17 turnovers in all, their highest total in 18 league games and most since committing 20 versus Tennessee State in the season opener.

Mykhailiuk and Azubuike hurt KU the most at OSU, with 4 turnovers apiece.

Oklahoma State scored 21 points off turnovers in a must-have victory.

OSU swat team

Kansas forward Silvio De Sousa (22) gets stuffed at the rim by Oklahoma State forward Cameron McGriff (12) during the second half, Saturday, March 3, 2018 at Gallagher-Iba Arena, in Stillwater, Okla.

Kansas forward Silvio De Sousa (22) gets stuffed at the rim by Oklahoma State forward Cameron McGriff (12) during the second half, Saturday, March 3, 2018 at Gallagher-Iba Arena, in Stillwater, Okla. by Nick Krug

Kansas converted a low percentage of its shots inside — 9 of 21 on layups and 6 of 8 on dunk attempts — as a result of OSU’s active defense around the rim.

The Cowboys’ eight blocked shots tied for their best in a league game this year. Similarly, it tied for the most swats by a KU opponent this year. OSU even pulled it off without the luxury of having a soon-to-be NBA lottery pick, like Mo Bamba, who sent eight Kansas shots away in the Big 12 opener.

In the first half, Tavarius Shine blocked Newman, Cameron McGriff got a piece of a Mykhailiuk jumper and swatted a Newman layup, Yankuba Sima denied Marcus Garrett at the rim and Solomon stymied Garrett inside.

In the closing 20 minutes, Solomon rejected Graham on a layup, Thomas Dziagwa blocked De Sousa and McGriff successfully stuffed a De Sousa dunk attempt.

KU (25 of 60 from the floor, for 41.7% shooting) played so poorly offensively that Oklahoma State walked away with its first double-digit win in conference action all season.

By the Numbers: Oklahoma State 82, Kansas 64

By the Numbers: Oklahoma State 82, Kansas 64

Reply 11 comments from Marius7782 Chad Smith Armen Kurdian Thomas Harrison Robert  Brock Layne Pierce Shannon Gustafson Soccercoach13 Bj Cassady Clara Westphal

5 stats that popped for Kansas in a Big 12/SEC Challenge win over Texas A&M

Kansas guard Malik Newman (14) raises his hand after sinking a three during the first half, Saturday, Jan. 27, 2018 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas guard Malik Newman (14) raises his hand after sinking a three during the first half, Saturday, Jan. 27, 2018 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

Kansas proved up for the so-called Big 12/SEC Challenge Saturday at Allen Fieldhouse, where the No. 5-ranked Jayhawks followed up a road loss at Oklahoma by taking care of Texas A&M.

The Jayhawks’ 15-2 advantage in fast-break points stood out, for sure, but there were plenty of other numbers that told the story of a 79-68 victory over the Aggies.

Here are five statistics that leapt off the box score for KU.

3-point weaponry

The Jayhawks cashed in on at least 12 3-pointers for the ninth time this season in their latest home win.

Connecting on 12 of 26 from downtown versus Texas A&M, KU’s 46.2% accuracy — a more-than-welcome success rate — was only the seventh-best shooting display of the season for the marksmen of Kansas, currently hitting 40.7% on the year.

As often has been the case at Allen Fieldhouse, KU came out firing for an early lead. Four different Jayhawks had drained a shot from beyond the arc before the midway point of the first half.

In the first five minutes, Kansas went 4-for-6 on 3-pointers, with both sophomore Malik Newman and senior Svi Mykhailiuk knocking down a pair. This season, KU is now 28-for-43 (65.1 percent) on 3-pointers taken in the first five minutes of games inside the fieldhouse.

Making the opponent pay

For the second straight game KU thrived off of its opponent’s mistakes.

Although scoring 22 points off 16 Oklahoma turnovers wasn’t enough for a Jayhawks road win four days earlier, they put the Aggies in a double-digit hole early by routinely feasting on A&M’s giveaways.

KU benefited from 14 Aggies turnovers to the tune of 24 points. A&M, though, only managed 5 points off KU’s 9 turnovers.

The Jayhawks’ 19-point advantage in the category was the most since throttling Toledo and out-scoring the Rockets by 25 in points off turnovers.

Over its last six games, KU has averaged 17.7 points off turnovers

Marcus Garrett’s 2nd-half scoring

Kansas guard Marcus Garrett (0) gets to the bucket past Texas A&M forward DJ Hogg (1) during the second half, Saturday, Jan. 27, 2018 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas guard Marcus Garrett (0) gets to the bucket past Texas A&M forward DJ Hogg (1) during the second half, Saturday, Jan. 27, 2018 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

The same freshman who had scored 6 or fewer points in each of KU’s previous 15 games led the team in scoring during the second half against A&M.

Marcus Garrett, who entered averaging 3.9 points on 42% shooting and 19% 3-point accuracy, made all four of his shot attempts in the second half — including a 3 from the right corner — to give Kansas 9 points in 11 minutes off the bench.

Garrett’s scoring outburst proved timely, as well, with typical leading scorer Devonte’ Graham going 0-for-7 in the half.

The 6-foot-5 freshman guard’s 9 points in the win were the most for Garrett since scoring 10 versus Oakland in late November. His career high of 13 came Nov. 21 against Texas Southern.

An effective driver for KU off the bench, Garrett had made just 5 of 27 3-pointers (18.5%) before confidently draining one off a Graham pass against the Aggies.

No letdown

Kansas center Udoka Azubuike (35) powers in a dunk over Texas A&M center Tyler Davis (34) after sending him to the floor during the second half, Saturday, Jan. 27, 2018 at Allen Fieldhouse. Azubuike was called for a technical foul after he hovered over Davis after the dunk.

Kansas center Udoka Azubuike (35) powers in a dunk over Texas A&M center Tyler Davis (34) after sending him to the floor during the second half, Saturday, Jan. 27, 2018 at Allen Fieldhouse. Azubuike was called for a technical foul after he hovered over Davis after the dunk. by Nick Krug

In five of their previous six games the Jayhawks led by double digits at some point. Each time that KU built at least a 10-point cushion, though, it resulted in a single-digit win or a loss (at OU).

Kansas had no such issues in the Big 12/SEC Challenge. Once Graham knocked down a 3-pointer with 9:58 to play in the first half, the home team had a double-digit lead for good. That’s right, A&M, didn’t even cut it back to single digits at any point during the final 29:58 of play.

KU’s ability to keep an opponent at bay led to its first double-digit win since beating Stanford, 75-54, on Dec. 21.

Not many freebies

Free throws were the primary subject most who follow KU basketball wanted to talk about earlier this week, in wake of Oklahoma’s Hack-A-Dok strategy and the free-throw struggles of the Jayhawks’ starting center, Udoka Azubuike.

However, Azubuike didn’t get a single shot at the foul line during his 22 minutes.

The rest of his teammates didn’t get many free-throw tries, either. Kansas attempted just 11 as a team, making 7. It was the fewest free-throw attempts for the Jayhawks since Big 12 play began.

In league games, KU is averaging 20.8 free throw attempts per game and 13.9 makes (66.9%).






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Shot selection, Texas Tech defense led to KU’s worst 3-point showing of season

Kansas guard Lagerald Vick (2) puts up a three over Texas Tech guard Justin Gray (5) during the first half, Tuesday, Jan. 2, 2018 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas guard Lagerald Vick (2) puts up a three over Texas Tech guard Justin Gray (5) during the first half, Tuesday, Jan. 2, 2018 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

A domain so welcoming to the Kansas basketball team this season, the territory behind the 3-point line didn’t yield typical results for the Jayhawks in their Big 12 home opener Tuesday night.

KU experienced its worst 3-point shooting performance of the season — 6-for-26, 23.1 percent — in an 85-73 loss to Texas Tech at Allen Fieldhouse.

Shockingly, after opening the game 6-for-12 from long range, the home team’s final successful 3 of the game came 2:23 before the two teams left the court for halftime. The Jayhawks missed their final 14 3-point tries of the loss, which included an 0-for-12 second half.

Afterward, KU senior guard Devonte’ Graham (27 points, 2-for-8 on 3-pointers) was asked if going 0-for in the final 20 minutes had anything to do with the Red Raiders’ defense.

“Nah, just off shooting basically. I didn’t know we missed all 12, but, yeah, it was just an off shooting night,” Graham replied.

The team’s leader had reason to remain so self-assured. Even after the slump-filled night, Kansas remained ranked 21st nationally in 3-point accuracy (40.9 percent) on the season.

Still, considering No. 10 KU (11-3 overall, 1-1 Big 12) has experienced such ruts before — 8 of 28 versus Kentucky, and 5 of 20 against Washington are the other sub-30 percent performances — and the team relies on 3-pointers as a weapon (see: the Jayhawks’ double-digit makes from downtown in eight games) it seemed worthwhile to look back at the 3-pointers that did and didn’t drop for Kansas in the loss to No. 18 Texas Tech (13-1, 2-0).

Below is a sequential recap of the long-distance misfires and hits (X = miss; √ = make).


FIRST HALF

X (19:03) — On KU’s opening possession Lagerald Vick settled for a contested step-back 3 from the left wing with the shot clock approaching 5 seconds.

√ (16:54) — Off a baseline out of bounds set, Graham drove into the paint and kicked out to the right corner for a wide-open Svi Mykhailiuk.

X (15:02) — Graham rose up early in the shot clock when given too much space, and just left it short.

X (14:15) — With the shot clock around seven, Graham opted to take a contested 3-pointer up top.

Kansas guard Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk (10) puts up a three before the Texas Tech bench during the first half, Tuesday, Jan. 2, 2018 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas guard Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk (10) puts up a three before the Texas Tech bench during the first half, Tuesday, Jan. 2, 2018 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

√ (9:58) — KU beat Tech’s transition defense as Graham threw ahead for Mykhailiuk on the right sideline, in front of the Red Raiders’ bench.

X (8:50) — Garrett kicked to Vick on the left half of the floor, but Keenan Evans was right there to outstretch his left arm and contest.

√ (8:32) — Another Graham push with Mykhailiuk out in front of him on the right wing provided an open look, yet again in front of the Tech bench.

√ (7:12) — Graham saw an open window up top when Niem Stevenson gambled, trying to swipe a Mitch Lightfoot pass, and Graham stepped into a 3-pointer

X (6:13) — Malik Newman caught a Graham pass on the right wing and tried to jab-step Justin Gray to create space for a step-back 3, but Gray stayed low, then got his hand in Newman’s face

√ (4:54) — Graham, whose feet stood on the beak of the giant mid-court Jayhawk logo, simply ball-faked on a catch to give himself room, took one dribble to his left and nailed a long 3 before Gray could recover.

X (4:09) — When Tech smothered Graham with a trap in the left corner, it left Vick wide open 10 feet away. Despite the extra space, Vick’s 3 rimmed out.

Kansas guard Sam Cunliffe (3) puts up a three from the corner against Texas Tech guard Jarrett Culver (23) during the first half, Tuesday, Jan. 2, 2018 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas guard Sam Cunliffe (3) puts up a three from the corner against Texas Tech guard Jarrett Culver (23) during the first half, Tuesday, Jan. 2, 2018 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

√ (2:23) — Azubuike caught an entry pass in the paint just below the free-throw line. When Tech’s defense shifted its focus toward the 7-footer, the center spotted backup wing Sam Cunliffe open in the left corner for as open a look as he’ll see all year.

X (1:18) — Following a timeout, Graham dribbled up the floor and Mykhailiuk set a ball screen for the point guard before popping open for a quality 3, which hit the back of the iron.

X (0:43) — Graham tried to exploit Tech’s retreating transition defense by pitching the ball to Mykhailiuk on the perimeter for a third time. When Tech closed out and forced him to drive, the senior from Ukraine kicked to Vick, who had a great look from the right side rim out.

SECOND HALF

X (16:59) — Mykhailiuk effectively slipped a ball screen for Graham and found an opening in the right corner. A pump fake sent Jarrett Culver flying by Mykhailiuk, who rose up and missed a high-percentage shot, leaving it short.

X (15:45) — A ball screen at the top of the key courtesy of Azubuike allowed Mykhailiuk to reach the apex of his jumper before his defender could recover. However, the 3 only made it as far as the front of the rim.

X (14:57) — Vick’s baseline drive gave him a lane to make a skip pass out to the right wing for Mykhailiuk, who missed his fourth 3 in a row.

X (10:04) — KU tried running Mykhailiuk off an Azubuike pick near the right block, and the 280-pounder gave the Ukrainian senior ample space for a right-corner 3, which refused to fall through the cylinder during a tough second-half stretch for Mykhailiuk.

X (7:03) — Thinking he might have caught Brandone Francis off guard as Marcus Garrett attempted to get open a few feet away, Graham pulled up with 21 seconds on the shot clock and misfired while fading away from Francis on a 3.

X (5:41) — Utilizing no action, Newman attempted to go one-on-one versus Francis on the left side of the floor, settled for a well-defended 3 with 17 left on the shot clock and missed to the left.

X (5:19) — A hard dribble and step-back gave Mykhailiuk the clearance he desired near the right corner momentarily, but Culver regrouped to get a hand in the shooter’s face.

X (5:17) — Mykhailiuk’s long offensive rebound of his own missed 3 allowed him to shovel a pass out to an open Graham at the top of the arc, but his fellow senior missed as a defender flew past him.

X (4:11) — Newman drove and passed to nearby Vick on the left wing. Though the junior from Memphis made a quick dribble to get more open, Francis’ extended arm obstructed Vick’s look at the 3.

X (1:54) — Down eight with less than two minutes to play, Graham tried to deliver a needed 3 from the right corner off a Newman pass. But he did so knowing Zhaire Smith was right there, and left the attempt short.

X (1:07) — With the Red Raiders’ lead up to 10, Vick dribbled into a pull-up 3 on the right side, but Culver went up to defend it and make sure KU got nothing easy.

X (0:11) — The game was all but over, and Graham raced up the floor and missed a 3 defended by Culver.


Unsurprisingly, KU fared far better when it found quality looks at 3-pointers (6-for-10 in the first half, 6-for-15 overall), as opposed to attempts that qualified as less-than-ideal (0-for-4 in the first, 0-for-11 overall).

Asked for his assessment of what his Red Raiders — now 14th nationally, with a 29.3 percent 3-point defense — did to take away one of KU’s strengths, Chris Beard said some good luck played a part in it.

“They got some good looks. We made some mistakes on some switches, so we were fortunate tonight,” Beard said. “But I think you’ve got to give our players credit. I do feel like there was an urgency to guard the 3-point line. With that came the opportunity for Kansas to drive the ball against us in the second half. But luckily we had a lead big enough to where we could sustain that.”

Bill Self, when discussing how Tech’s defense of the 3-point line might have differed from other opponents, cited how the Red Raiders defended ball screens. Beard’s players iced or downed in those situations at times — a strategy that, when successful, takes away the potential to even attempt a 3-pointer, because the defenders aren’t going under picks, gifting shooters with clear lines of vision.

“They are a pressure defensive team. Chris has done a great job of getting them up the floor and playing their man before he catches it and all that stuff. So I would say they did a good job of playing higher on the floor and not letting us get a lot of wide-open looks,” Self said.

“To me, the first half we made six 3’s and I thought three of them were awful shots, they just happened to go in,” KU’s coach added.

Mykhailiuk, who went 3-for-4 from 3-point distance in the first half and 0-for-5 in the second, said the Red Raiders’ defensive activity made them unique.

“Definitely. It started with denying the ball,” said Mykhailiuk, who is shooting 38-for-84 (45.2 percent) on 3’s this year. “They didn’t let us catch anything. It was breaking down everything.”

The Jayhawks will look to rediscover their 3-point touch Saturday at No. 16 TCU (13-1, 1-1). The Horned Frogs have held opponents to 33.3 percent 3-point shooting (128th in the country).

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