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Posts tagged with Dedric Lawson

Path to Golden State roster spot will be difficult for Dedric Lawson

TCU forward Lat Mayen (11) defends as Kansas forward Dedric Lawson (1) attempts a shot in the first half of an NCAA college basketball game in Fort Worth, Texas, Monday, Feb. 11, 2019. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)

TCU forward Lat Mayen (11) defends as Kansas forward Dedric Lawson (1) attempts a shot in the first half of an NCAA college basketball game in Fort Worth, Texas, Monday, Feb. 11, 2019. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez) by Tony Gutierrez/AP Photo

There are far easier paths to an NBA career than the one Dedric Lawson must now traverse.

No one expected the offensively gifted forward who spent his redshirt junior season at Kansas leading the Big 12 in scoring and rebounding to become a lottery pick or first round pick in Thursday night’s draft. Most experts didn’t even project Lawson as a second round pick, and they were proven correct.

The undrafted Lawson at least has a shot, though, thanks to the Golden State Warriors offering him a spot on their summer league roster. And if he’s going to prove himself deserving of a regular season spot with the defending Western Conference champs or one of the league’s other 29 teams, it will likely be Lawson’s jump shot that determines his staying power.

He may be 6-foot-8.5 in shoes and weigh 233 pounds, but Lawson isn’t going to suddenly become an elite finisher at the rim or a sturdy defender of the paint. His successes, whether great or few in number, will come when he has the ball in his hands outside of the post.

Lawson proved to be a reliable 3-point shooter as a big during his one season playing for the Jayhawks, knocking down 39.3% from outside (35 for 89 in 36 games).

And, believe it or not, that particular skill actually is one that Golden State could use some more of next season. Even though the greatest shooter of all time, Steph Curry, will still be around, Kevin Durant is widely expected to bolt in free agency, and even if Durant were to re-sign with the Warriors his ruptured right Achilles’ tendon will most likely sideline him for all of the 2019-20 schedule. Then there’s the matter of sharpshooter Klay Thompson. Curry’s Splash Brother tore an ACL in the Warriors’ Game 6 loss to Toronto in the NBA Finals. Most expect Golden State to re-sign Thompson, who is a free agent, but his knee injury will force him to miss most if not all of next season, as well.

In that regard, it’s not completely absurd to talk yourself into a scenario in which Lawson excels offensively this summer, gets a training camp invite as a result and ultimately becomes a reserve forward worth keeping around on the cheap.

However, it will take Lawson looking proficient and maybe even playing above his head to make that a reality. Though the only players currently under contract with the Warriors for next season are Curry, Draymond Green, Andre Iguodala, Jacob Evans, Damian Jones, Shaun Livingston and Alfonzo McKinnie — and the contracts of Livingston and McKinnie aren’t guaranteed — there are incoming rookies who soon will join that list, and Lawson will have to either outperform them or prove he meshes well with them.

Golden State drafted shooting guard Jordan Poole late in the first round, but both of the organization’s second round choices qualify as competition for Lawson, because they are forwards and will be given a priority over a summer league roster player.

Alen Smailagic, the No. 39 pick in the draft, is a player in whom the Warriors truly are invested. A 6-10 big known for his pick-and-pop ability as well as slashing, Smailagic spent this past year playing for Golden State’s G League team, Santa Cruz.

Two picks later, Golden State snatched up another forward, 6-6 Eric Paschall, from Villanova. The hard-nosed Paschall is tough enough to defend inside even though he is undersized, and he shot 34.8% from 3-point range as a college senior.

Lawson’s chances to stick with the Warriors would seem far more feasible if Smailagic and Paschall weren’t in the mix. We don’t yet know what other forwards Golden State may add this offseason, and there already are four ahead of Lawson in the pecking order, with Green, Iguodala and the two rookies, not to mention McKinnie, if he’s back.

The good news for Lawson, though, is that he has the flexibility to end up with another franchise if he plays to his strengths with the Warriors’ summer league team. He may lack the athleticism and explosiveness of other rookies, but the 21-year-old prospect understands the game. If Lawson fits in well offensively with his summer teammates as a shooter and ball mover — and don’t forget that he can be an effective rebounder, too — that could be enough to impress other team’s scouts and coaches.

Organizations looking to spend big this summer in free agency will have to fill out their rosters with inexpensive players. And if a maxed out team ends up needing a big who can shoot and pass, that would be an ideal landing spot for the forward from Memphis with an enviable basketball IQ.

Reply 4 comments from Oddgirl2 Shannon Gustafson Dirk Medema Robert  Brock

After Hornets workout Dedric Lawson says he’d love to reunite with Devonte’ Graham

Kansas senior guard Devonte' Graham smiles with transfers Dedric Lawson and Charlie Moore after a missed chance by Mitch Lightfoot during an exhibition game Tuesday against Pittsburg State at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas senior guard Devonte' Graham smiles with transfers Dedric Lawson and Charlie Moore after a missed chance by Mitch Lightfoot during an exhibition game Tuesday against Pittsburg State at Allen Fieldhouse.

As Dedric Lawson’s pre-draft workout tour picks up steam following this past week’s excursion to the NBA Draft Combine, a trip to the southeast this week provided Lawson with a University of Kansas reunion.

A day after Lawson, as well as Jayhawks Quentin Grimes and Silvio De Sousa, worked out for the Bulls in Chicago on Monday, Lawson was in Charlotte, N.C., the current home of his former KU roommate, Devonte’ Graham.

During a post-workout interview, Lawson said a year ago around this time he talked to Graham on quite a few occasions just to see how life on the pre-draft circuit was going for the point guard.

“He always said, ‘Man, I’m working. It’s a lot of workouts, it’s a lot of grinding,’” Lawson recalled.

Lawson said he and Graham were able to reconnect before the Hornets workout at the team’s practice facility. It was there that Graham reminded Lawson he worked out for about 15 franchises before becoming a second-round draft pick of Charlotte in 2018.

According to the KU forward who is hoping to follow in his one-time roommate’s footsteps as a draftee, Graham’s advice for the whole process was, “Just do you.”

“That’s something that got him to the point he’s at,” Lawson said. “We’ve been through tough times at Kansas in practices and things like that. So he definitely knows what I’m capable of and he knows I’m ready for the moment.”

Lawson described his session with the Hornets as both “fun” and competitive. The workout also featured Iowa State’s Marial Shayok, Seton Hall’s Myles Powell and Georgetown’s Jessie Govan, among others.

After competing against other draft hopefuls, and trying to turn that work into a job in the NBA, Lawson described what he thought he was able to showcase in front of Hornets coaches and decision makers.

“I was able to show that I can make the NBA 3, make plays for others and play defense on smaller guys, as well,” Lawson related. “So I think it was an overall pretty good day.”

Lawson, who measured out at the combine as 6-foot-8.5 in shoes and 233 pounds, led the Big 12 in scoring (19.4 points per game) and rebounding (10.3 boards a game) during his debut season with the Jayhawks this past year.

He said he interviewed with some members of the Hornets’ front office at the combine, as well, and called it a “blessing” to be in Charlotte for the workout.

“(Graham) always tells me how great the city is and stuff like that,” Lawson shared, “so I’m glad to be here.”

In a mock draft from Michael Scotto of The Athletic, Lawson projects as the 57th pick, which currently belongs to the New Orleans Pelicans.

The Hornets possess two second-round picks in the June 20 draft: No. 36 and No. 52 overall.

A longterm reunion for Jayhawks Lawson and Graham in the Queen City, Lawson said, would be great.

“I never got the chance to play with him on the court,” Lawson said of redshirting during Graham’s senior season in Lawrence. “I loved playing with him at practice. He’s a great human being to be around, a great personality, high IQ for the game. And I think he’s one of the best teammates I’ve ever been around, even though I didn’t even play with him.”

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Postgame Report Card: Auburn 89, Kansas 75

Kansas guard Quentin Grimes (5) gets up for a bucket and a blocking foul on Auburn forward Horace Spencer (0) during the second half on Saturday, March 23, 2019 at Vivint Smart Homes Arena in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Kansas guard Quentin Grimes (5) gets up for a bucket and a blocking foul on Auburn forward Horace Spencer (0) during the second half on Saturday, March 23, 2019 at Vivint Smart Homes Arena in Salt Lake City, Utah. by Nick Krug

Salt Lake City — Grades for five aspects of the Kansas basketball team’s 89-75 loss to Auburn in the second round of the NCAA Tournament.

Offense: C-

Kansas would need some form of life offensively in the first half to keep Auburn within reach, but didn’t come close to accomplishing that.

The Jayhawks’ season was all but over by halftime, after shooting 8-for-27 in the opening 20 minutes and turning the ball over 8 times. A 1-for-10 half from 3-point range derailed KU’s chances of keeping pace, too, as Auburn built an insurmountable 51-25 lead by intermission.

The offense was more tentative than assertive when KU needed to find a way to step up and match Auburn’s intensity.

While KU shot nearly 60% from the floor in the second half, it barely put a dent in the Tigers’ massive lead.

Defense: F

Auburn wanted to play fast and shoot 3-pointers, and the Jayhawks did nothing to stop the Tigers from doing so.

With Bryce Brown burying 3’s out of the gate, the SEC Tournament champions were the aggressors and KU didn’t come up with anything that would make them feel uncomfortable.

The Tigers sprinted to a 34-8 advantage in fast-break points and shot 52% from the floor to advance to the Sweet 16.

Frontcourt: C

No one in a KU uniform was ready in the first half to counter Auburn’s energy. Even Dedric Lawson, who once again finished with a double-double (25 points, 10 rebounds), went 1-for-7 from the floor in the opening 20 minutes.

Freshman big David McCormack got off to a promising start, with 5 quick points, as well as 5 rebounds in the first half. But matchups and the game’s tempo dictated that Kansas had to play smaller, with four guards, and McCormack was the odd man out.

McCormack capped his freshman year with 11 points and 6 rebounds, plus a couple of assists.

Backcourt: C-

Devon Dotson (13 points, 4 rebounds, 3 assists) tried to give KU some kind of spark early on, but couldn’t get going offensively until the second half.

Some defensive missteps by Quentin Grimes in the game’s opening minutes, as Auburn exploded to a big lead, drew the ire of Bill Self.

And Grimes (15 points, 5-for-11 shooting, 2 assists) got most of his stats in the second half, when Auburn’s ticket to Kansas City was basically already punched.

Ochai Agbaji again failed to get out of his late-season slump, going 1-for-5 from the floor and grabbing 1 rebound.

Bench: D

Marcus Garrett, too ill to join the team for Friday activities at the arena, didn’t appear to be back at full health. In 20 minutes, the sophomore guard provided 7 points and 3 rebounds, but seemed a little less quick.

K.J. Lawson was the only other substitute to score, and he put up his 2 points at the free throw line.

Mitch Lightfoot grabbed 2 rebounds in 10 minutes.

Reply 7 comments from Marius7782 Dale Rogers Cassadys Jhawki78 Layne Pierce Robert  Brock

1 win down and … how many to go for the Jayhawks?

Kansas forward Dedric Lawson falls back into his locker while laughing with his brother K.J. Lawson on Friday, March 22, 2019 at Vivint Smart Homes Arena in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Kansas forward Dedric Lawson falls back into his locker while laughing with his brother K.J. Lawson on Friday, March 22, 2019 at Vivint Smart Homes Arena in Salt Lake City, Utah. by Nick Krug

Salt Lake City — Thursday afternoon inside the Kansas locker room, shortly after the Jayhawks opened their path through the NCAA Tournament with a first-round victory over Northeastern, head coach Bill Self had a question for his players.

“Good job. Hey, guys. One down and how many to go?” Self asked.

A mixture of responses followed, with “five” being the overriding reply.

“One,” Self quickly corrected them, as seen in a video posted on KU’s social media accounts. “One down. One to go. Hey, hey. One down and one to go, OK? All right, good job.”

When it comes to March Madness, Self always prompts his teams to look at each stop along the way as its own, four-team, two-game tournament. If the Jayhawks win the first two-game tournament, they get to go somewhere else and try to win another.

Apparently at least a few players who grew up watching The Big Dance and came to KU with dreams of chasing a national championship got caught up in the moment, knowing six wins is what it takes to cut down the nets at the Final Four.

“That tells you the impact I’ve had on their lives, as far as them paying attention,” Self would joke after the fact.

None by Kansas Basketball

So who was to blame? Who said five?

“I think I said five,” a smiling Dedric Lawson admitted Friday at Vivint Smart Home Arena, ahead of KU’s second-round matchup with Auburn. “I forgot it was a two-game tournament.”

And with that response, Lawson didn’t hesitate to use the conversation as an opportunity to mess with nearby teammate Charlie Moore, teasingly throwing him under the bus.

“It was really Charlie’s fault. Charlie, he play too much. He’s the one that made me say five,” a grinning Lawson continued. “But we all know it’s a two-game tournament, one game at a time and things like that, so we can’t get ahead of ourselves.

Why was Moore at fault? What did he do?

“He play too much, man,” Lawson replied. “I ain’t even gonna say what he did.”

Learning that Lawson had just placed the blame on him, Moore provided his version of the story.

“That was definitely Dedric. I wasn’t gonna say nothing. But Dedric said five. If you’re listening closely to the video you’ll hear Dedric say it,” the smiling Moore insisted.

With Moore and Lawson cracking themselves up with their accusations, Moore’s assertion continued.

“Everybody said one. Dedric yelled five,” Moore argued. “He over-yelled everybody, ’cause he thought he was right. But he really wasn’t.”

Why did Lawson say it was Moore then?

“I was next to him. I don’t know why he said that,” Moore retorted.

As the allegations flew back and forth, the reactions from David McCormack, sitting in the locker stall between Lawson and Moore, indicated he knew something.

Asked for some insight, McCormack provided his opinion.

“I mean, you can never tell with these two. Between them, Marcus (Garrett), all of them, they all like to joke around,” McCormack said. “Maybe Charlie might have tapped Dedric … I don’t know. I wouldn’t put it past him, honestly. He probably told him the right answer was five and everybody else said one.”

What was McCormack’s response to Self’s question?

“I took the smart route and I didn’t say anything. I just whispered to myself,” the freshman big explained, “and said one after the fact. So right or wrong, I just didn’t get called out.”

Whomever was to blame, McCormack said Lawson was “by far” the loudest to give the incorrect answer. But he wasn’t sure if there were others on Team Five.

“I just know I was standing next to Dedric, so he definitely said five,” McCormack said.

Surely veteran Mitch Lightfoot didn’t fail Self’s postgame locker room test, right?

“I don’t know what I said, to be honest,” Lightfoot claimed. “I’m not gonna self-incriminate, either. The next time he asks, we’ll be locked in on one.”

Of course, in order to do that the Jayhawks will have to get past Auburn on Saturday night.

“We’ve got to lock in for our second game of this one,” Lightfoot said, “and hopefully get to the next one.”

You can’t knock any of KU’s players for having large scale goals this time of year. The vibe the Jayhawks gave off in their locker room was one of confidence. They believe in themselves and their ability to make a deep run.

The incorrect “five” response that popped to the front of some players’ minds allowed them to have some fun along the way, too. But they all understand the crux of Self’s one down, one to go message.

“You can’t win five games if you don’t win one game,” Lightfoot said. “Slight issue.”

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Postgame Report Card: Kansas 87, Northeastern 53

Kansas guard Devon Dotson (11) gets under the Northeastern defense for a bucket during the first half, Thursday, March 21, 2019 at Vivint Smart Homes Arena in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Kansas guard Devon Dotson (11) gets under the Northeastern defense for a bucket during the first half, Thursday, March 21, 2019 at Vivint Smart Homes Arena in Salt Lake City, Utah. by Nick Krug

Salt Lake City — Quick grades for five aspects of the Kansas basketball team’s 87-53 win over Northeastern on Thursday at Vivint Smart Home Arena.

Offense: B

Though the Jayhawks missed shots in the opening minutes, they were able to get out in front by securing second chances on the glass and getting out in the open floor for transition opportunities.

The Jayhawks’ burst of 7 consecutive fast-break points helped them lead 18-11 a little more than 8 minutes in.

KU’s clear advantage inside assured the No. 4 seed and favorite of easy points much of the first half.

After a low-turnover opening 20 minutes, KU coughed it up three times in the first three minutes of the second, allowing NU to trim KU’s lead to 7 quickly. However, the Jayhawks gave the Huskies a dose of their own medicine after a timeout, as both Quentin Grimes and Dedric Lawson drained a 3-pointer, and Lawson got back to work inside to give KU a 15-point advantage, its largest lead of the game at that point.

The Jayhawks dissected NU’s defense, shooting 56 percent from the field in a win that advanced them to a Saturday matchup with Auburn.

Defense: A

The Huskies’ 3-point attack proved effective right out of the gate in the first-round matchup, with Jordan Roland draining a couple and big man Tomas Murphy another to give the Vegas underdogs the start they wanted and a 3-for-5 mark from deep early.

Bill Self didn’t stick with his starting lineup or two-big look for long, though, and with four guards capable of defending the perimeter on the court, KU did a solid job in the first half of keeping Northeastern from getting hot from long range.

While the Huskies were able to get inside for looks, KU’s bigs did a nice job of staying active and making it less than automatic for NU in the paint, and the CAA postseason champs went 1-for-9 on layups and dunks in the first half.

NU’s season ended as KU limited the would-be Cinderella to 6-for-28 3-point shooting and 28-percent shooting overall.

Frontcourt: B

Other than a defensive misstep here or there in the first half, Dedric Lawson gave KU exactly the type of first half it wanted out of its best player.

Lawson had 16 points and 7 boards by intermission, as well as a block and a steal as KU led 37-25 at the break.

KU’s go-to big entered the second half ready to resume his takeover. And once the Jayhawks got back on track by following his lead, Lawson was able to rest longer than usual for a stretch in the second half, en route to experiencing his first NCAA Tournament win in style, producing 25 points and 11 rebounds.

David McCormack started the game but only logged 11 minutes, many of them with the game basically over. KU played variations of its four-guard lineup through much of what turned into a rout and didn’t need its freshman big man much.

McCormack went scoreless but provided 5 rebounds and 2 assists.

Backcourt: B

It became evident within a few minutes that NU didn’t have a defensive answer for Devon Dotson, especially in the open floor.

The freshman point guard’s confidence and assertiveness with the ball in his hands allowed KU to avoid any real first-half scare or nerves.

Dotson routinely sped by defenders, both in transition and in the half court. Just the threat of what he could do opened up the floor for his teammates, as well.

Though Quentin Grimes went scoreless in 18 first-half minutes, his defense was usually spot on and he continued to be an important passer offensively. The freshman shooting guard finished 1-for-5 from 3-point range and provided 3 points and 3 assists.

Ochai Agbaji’s best energy plays came when he crashed the offensive glass for tip-ins in the second half as KU was in the process of putting Northeastern away.

While Agbaji started, he played 20 minutes, coming through with 13 points and 5 rebounds.

Bench: A

Marcus Garrett didn’t start, but it only took a couple minutes for Self to turn to his team-first glue guy and sixth man. One of KU’s smarter players on both ends of the court, Garrett gave the Jayhawks their first separation of the afternoon when he scored back-to-back layups, the second of which he created by stealing the ball near midcourt.

While Garrett (8 points, 5 rebounds) was solid it was K.J. Lawson who stole the show off the bench.

K.J.’s first few minutes off the bench weren’t great, but that didn’t discourage him one bit. His assertiveness picked up when NU totally ignored him on a fast break for an easy layup in the first half and that seemed to empower him.

KU needed an offensive boost from someone off the bench and, boy, was K.J. the man for that job. The tough-nosed redshirt sophomore contributed 13 points and 3 rebounds.

KU’s old man, junior big Mitch Lightfoot, gave the victors 5 points and 7 rebounds.

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Jayhawks get 4-guard do-over to open NCAA Tournament

Iowa State guard Nick Weiler-Babb (1) gets in for a bucket as the Jayhawks watch during the second half, Saturday, March 16, 2019 at Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo.

Iowa State guard Nick Weiler-Babb (1) gets in for a bucket as the Jayhawks watch during the second half, Saturday, March 16, 2019 at Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo. by Nick Krug

On Saturday night in Kansas City, Mo., shortly after Kansas lost to Iowa State in the Big 12 tournament championship game, freshman point guard Devon Dotson sat in the Jayhawks’ Sprint Center locker room answering questions about what went wrong.

As he detailed both the positives and negatives of the defeat from KU’s perspective, Dotson emphasized that the disappointing result came with some important lessons, especially when it came to defending a team such as ISU, which plays four guards and one big man.

“They ran some stuff that I think got us tricked up a little bit, but for the most part, I feel like we can learn from this — how to defend four guards better,” Dotson said. “And how we can score on the other end easier when our shots aren’t falling. We can find other ways to get the ball in the basket.”

Thanks to the NCAA Tournament selection committee, the Jayhawks don’t have to wait long for a do-over.

Five days after their four-guard counter failed to topple the Cyclones, they’ll take on Northeastern’s four-guard attack in Salt Lake City, Utah, on Thursday afternoon.

Iowa State’s guards possess their specific strengths and weaknesses and it’s overgeneralizing to say the Huskies will challenge KU in exactly the same fashion. For one, Northeastern’s top four guards rely even more on 3-pointers. According to hoop-math.com, among NU’s four starting guards, three take more than half of their shots from downtown, while the other came up just shy of that cutoff.

Jordan Roland takes 66.7 percent of his shots from 3-point range, Donnell Gresham Jr. comes in at 60.6 percent, Bolden Brace is at 58.7 percent and even Vava Puscia attempts 47.3 percent of his field goals from behind the arc.

After the brackets revealed KU (25-9) would play as the No. 4 seed in the Midwest, head coach Bill Self was asked Sunday evening whether the previous day’s matchup with ISU would help the Jayhawks in any way against No. 13 seed Northeastern (23-10), the Colonial Athletic Association’s postseason champions.

"In theory, yes. But we prepared to play Iowa State with one walkthrough, so it wasn't like we practiced to play Iowa State,” Self noted. “We practiced last week for Texas, with actually a thought we would play Texas Tech (in the Big 12 semifinals, instead of West Virginia, which upset the Red Raiders). It will probably help more than it would hurt, but hopefully we'll be better prepared to be better at it with three days of practice."

Against Iowa State, KU began the game as it usually does, playing with two bigs, Dedric Lawson and David McCormack. But the Cyclones gave KU too many issues and Self went with four guards during much of the title game.

Don’t expect to see Self start Marcus Garrett in the NCAA Tournament’s first round just because Northeastern plays four guards, though. The Jayhawks figure to stick with two bigs to have an advantage inside offensively. And then if and when necessary they can play four guards and do so comfortably after having days to go over actions and strategies designed to overcome Northeastern.

| PODCAST: Breaking down the big bracket and KU's road this March |

Before the Jayhawks had much time to get into scouting reports or watch video of Northeastern, Lawson indicated Sunday night KU could play with four guards or three against Northwestern in its tournament opener.

“Coach, he already talked about he’s been in the business a long time and he knows what it takes to win. So he basically talked about sometimes play two bigs, sometimes play one big,” Lawson related. “Whatever the case may be, we all just have to buy into that role and that scouting report.”

Should the game dictate that McCormack spend less time on the court and more minutes on the bench, the 6-foot-10 freshman won’t get his feelings hurt. He explained after KU’s loss to Iowa State why logging 8 minutes didn’t catch him off guard or greatly trouble him.

“We have a full understanding of knowing how the other team plays and that they might want to play small — well, not even might — they’re gonna play small. You’re a big man and when you want to play to the advantage of your team, you understand that. It’s not an individual sport. It’s about the team and what we can do to win,” McCormack said. “So the variation in minutes didn’t affect me.”

If McCormack is forced off the floor, it won’t be because of any shortcoming of his, but the result of Northeastern’s shooting and KU’s need to have Lawson on the court as much as possible.

Between 6-foot-1 redshirt junior Roland (.408 3-point shooter), 6-1 redshirt junior Gresham (.393), 6-5 redshirt senior Puscia (.401) and junior Brace (.415), the Huskies may prove to have the fire power to force an adjustment.

If KU spends any time using Garrett, Dotson, Quentin Grimes, Ochai Agbaji and Lawson as its lineup, the Jayhawks are confident in that group, even though it couldn’t rally past the Cyclones this past weekend.

“I felt like we rebounded the ball good for having four guards out there,” Garrett said of one positive, after KU had a 41-36 advantage on the glass against ISU. “We’ve just got to go back to the drawing board, and just learn how to defend at the end of the shot clock.”

Immediately after KU lost to a four-guard lineup in K.C., Lawson predicted the Jayhawks would handle any opponent of that ilk better in the NCAA Tournament.

“Just keep the competitiveness,” he said. “I think guys definitely competed. We keep that competitive nature we’ll be good.”

The Jayhawks obviously have the personnel to handle the Huskies, and by the time the game tips off on Thursday afternoon they’ll be well versed in what each member of the potential Cinderella team from Boston brings to the floor.

KU’s players seem confident. And they’re saying all the right things. Now they just need to prove that they absorbed the wisdom ISU’s four guards made available to them.

Reply 7 comments from Carsonc30 David Howell Cassadys Chad Smith Buddhadude Dirk Medema Surrealku

Postgame Report Card: Iowa State 78, Kansas 66

Kansas guard Marcus Garrett (0) grabs an offensive rebound from Iowa State forward Michael Jacobson (12) during the first half, Saturday, March 16, 2019 at Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo.

Kansas guard Marcus Garrett (0) grabs an offensive rebound from Iowa State forward Michael Jacobson (12) during the first half, Saturday, March 16, 2019 at Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo. by Nick Krug

Kansas City, Mo. — Quick grades for five aspects of the Kansas basketball team’s 78-66 loss to Iowa State on Saturday night in the Big 12 title game.

Offense: C-

KU couldn’t immediately settle in offensively in the first half, with a rowdy bunch of ISU fans screaming in support of every play that went the Cyclones’ way. The Jayhawks didn’t appear anything close to rattled. But they definitely weren’t crisp, and ISU jumped out to a 13-8 lead.

Still, the slow offensive start seemed contagious at times, as KU missed layups, 3-pointers and free throws throughout most of the first half. With 4:12 left before halftime, the Jayhawks were 10 for 31 from the floor (8 for 16 on layups), 0 for 7 on 3-pointers and 1 for 6 at the foul line. At that point, ISU led 27-21.

The Cyclones’ lead would grow to 11 before KU could get out of the miserable half and head to the locker room. The Jayhawks went almost 6 full minutes without even scoring late in the half, before Dedric Lawson went 1-for-2 at the foul line with 0:38 to go. Devon Dotson accounted for the last field goal of the half with 6:34 on the clock.

KU shot 10 for 36 in the first half, turned it over 7 times, was 0 for 9 on 3-pointers and 2-for-8 on free throws. In summation: ouch.

Down 32-22 entering the second half, KU’s offense improved. But how could it have been worse?

Even though KU made much better use of its trips into the paint in the second half, they spent basically the entirety of the half trailing by double figures, because it was going to take a borderline miraculous offensive display to catch up once the Jayhawks squandered a handful of early possessions out of halftime.

KU finished the loss 39.4% from the floor, 3 for 18 on 3-pointers and 7 for 13 at the foul line.

Defense: C

Early on the defensive energy came in the form of blocked shots from Quentin Grimes and a steal and layup for Devon Dotson. In the meantime, the Jayhawks often were fortunate that ISU missed some open looks from 3-point range.

Luckily for KU, and you have to give at least partial credit to the defense for this, the Cyclones weren’t exactly on point offensively in the first half either. ISU has the potential to explode with 3-point shooting and strong guard play. But the Cyclones were 3 for 11 from deep and 13 of 31 overall before intermission.

The defense just wasn’t there in the second half, though. The Cyclones led by as many as 17 points fewer than 3 minutes into the half.

ISU spent much of the decisive half scoring at will and shot 56.5% in the final 20 minutes, while making 4 of 8 3-pointers.

Frontcourt: D

Although Dedric Lawson scored a couple of baskets in the first few minutes, he hit a serious funk soon after, even short-arming a wide-open layup attempt. He finished the half 2 for 11 and didn’t get his third hoop of the night until making an and-one layup inside with KU down 17, minutes into the second half.

Lawson finished a forgettable night with 18 points, 8 rebounds and shot 8 for 21.

Freshman David McCormack, meanwhile, was hardly a factor much of the game. ISU’s four-guard lineup made it difficult for Kansas to play both Lawson and McCormack, because one of them would inevitably be a defensive liability from a matchup standpoint.

McCormack contributed 4 points and 2 boards in 8 minutes.

Backcourt: C-

Dotson was the only player in a KU uniform consistently making winning plays on both ends of the floor for much of the title game.

The freshman point guard’s solid efforts (17 points, 3 rebounds) couldn’t make up for the way the team played as a whole, though.

After a hot shooting night in the semifinals, Grimes couldn’t keep it going in the title game, finishing with 10 points and going 0 for 6 on 3-pointers.

Ochai Agbaji, too, struggled more than he prospered, providing the most help he could with his 6 rebounds, while scoring 5 points.

Bench: C

Marcus Garrett deserved a ton of credit for ISU not completely running away with this game, and he played so well that Bill Self started him in the second half instead of McCormack.

Garrett killed it on the defensive glass, and had 9 total rebounds by halftime. The sophomore guard finished with 7 points, 15 boards and 4 assists while also providing his characteristically smart and effort-driven defense.

When Dotson got into foul trouble in both halves, Charlie Moore came through with a few positive moments, and totaled 5 points and 1 assist in 14 minutes.

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Postgame Report Card: Kansas 88, West Virginia 74

Kansas forward Dedric Lawson (1) turns for a shot over West Virginia forward Lamont West (15) during the first half, Friday, March 15, 2019 at Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo.

Kansas forward Dedric Lawson (1) turns for a shot over West Virginia forward Lamont West (15) during the first half, Friday, March 15, 2019 at Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo. by Nick Krug

Kansas City, Mo. — Grades for five aspects of the Kansas basketball team’s 88-74 win over West Virginia on Friday night in the Big 12 semifinals.

Offense: B+

If KU hadn’t turned the ball over 16 times there wouldn’t have been much to complain about on the offensive end.

The Jayhawks scored 46 points in the paint, shot 40% from 3-point range (8 for 20) and made 52.4% of their field goal attempts overall.

Defense: C+

Bill Self hated KU’s defense on this night, harping on WVU’s ability to easily score early on in the first half.

The Mountaineers shot 27.3% on 3-pointers and only scored 9 second-chance points. But they did make 43.5% of their shots overall, scored 40 in the paint and turned the ball over 11 times on the night.

Frontcourt: B+

David McCormack didn’t dominate in stretches like he did in the quarterfinals versus Texas, but the freshman big man still had his effective moments on offense, on the glass and with his effort, finishing with 7 points and 8 boards.

Dedric Lawson, on the other hand, was just as efficient as anyone could hope for. The junior forward shot 9 for 13 from the field, made 2 of 3 from 3-point range and connected on all 4 of his free throws.

Backcourt: B+

Quentin Grimes caught fire in the first half, giving KU the momentum it needed to advance. Grimes drilled 5 of 8 3-pointers on the night and added 8 rebounds and 4 assists for a remarkable evening overall.

Devon Dotson, too, proved more than WVU defenders could handle on several occasions, and finished with 13 points, 5 rebounds and 6 assists.

Ochai Agbaji went for 9 points and 3 boards in 21 minutes.

Bench: B-

Marcus Garrett keeps looking more mobile and comfortable on the ankle that hobbled him earlier this season. His defense and drives to the paint made him as valuable as anyone for KU, as he finished with 11 points, 5 rebounds and 2 assists.

Mitch Lightfoot also had his moments, though not as often as Garrett. The junior blocked 4 shots in just 15 minutes and scored 4 points.

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Dedric Lawson repeatedly reminded of painful March Madness memory from his childhood

Kansas forward Dedric Lawson (1) turns around for a shot over Texas forward Jericho Sims (20) during the second half, Thursday, March 14, 2019 at Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo.

Kansas forward Dedric Lawson (1) turns around for a shot over Texas forward Jericho Sims (20) during the second half, Thursday, March 14, 2019 at Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo. by Nick Krug

Kansas City, Mo. — Prompted Thursday night after his Big 12 tournament debut to take a trip down his personal March Madness Memory Lane, Dedric Lawson’s roots popped up.

A native of Memphis, Tenn., and, of course, a former Memphis Tiger himself, it came as no surprise that his hometown college basketball program left quite an impression on him as a child.

Though Lawson said he didn’t run around Memphis as a youngster wearing a Derrick Rose or Chris Douglas-Roberts jersey, those were his two favorite players when he first started following the game closely.

The Memphis basketball program really began to take off under then-head coach John Calipari when Lawson was in elementary school, and Lawson found himself drawn most to Douglas-Roberts, a versatile small forward not too dissimilar from the player Lawson would grow to become.

“He was more of like a 3,” Lawson said of why as a child he chose the 6-foot-7 Douglas-Roberts as his favorite player instead of the explosive point guard, Rose. “I met those guys when they were at Memphis. We used to go around the program and things like that. They was real cool. Robert Dozier (a Tigers big man), he was real, real cool, too.”

Years later, when Lawson was a member of the Memphis program, playing his first season under coach Josh Pastner and his second for Tubby Smith, some of those Tigers he grew up admiring would come back around.

“We played pickup together and things like that. Those were cool people,” Lawson said.

And with Memphis basketball so much a part of his DNA, Lawson couldn’t help but laugh about the fact that his favorite childhood team lost to Kansas in the 2008 national championship game.

Lawson was 10 years old when the man who is now his head coach, Bill Self, guided the Jayhawks to an overtime victory against Calipari and Memphis.

Was he bitter at the time?

“I definitely was,” a smiling Lawson admitted, adding he remembers it like it was yesterday.

Kansas guard Mario Chalmers elevates for the three-pointer that put the game into overtime. Chalmers connected with 2.1 seconds left to tie it at 63, and the Jayhawks went on to win, 75-68 in overtime, April 7, 2008, in San Antonio.

Kansas guard Mario Chalmers elevates for the three-pointer that put the game into overtime. Chalmers connected with 2.1 seconds left to tie it at 63, and the Jayhawks went on to win, 75-68 in overtime, April 7, 2008, in San Antonio. by Nick Krug

Perhaps unfortunately for Lawson and those old March Madness scars from his time as a fan, he gets a reminder of that pain before every KU home game, when the hype video plays a clip of Mario Chalmers’ iconic 3-pointer that sent the 2008 title game to OT.

“I’m cool with it now,” a laughing Lawson shared. “I’m a part of both cultures. There’s not really too much bitterness no more. And Mario, he’s a cool guy, as well. It was great for Mario. It was something great that happened for him, something sad that happened for Memphis.”

Of course, Lawson and the Jayhawks aim to create their own March Madness memories this weekend and beyond. And right now, their focus is on Friday night’s semifinal at Sprint Center, where they will meet up with an unlikely foe, No. 10 seed West Virginia.

Lawson couldn’t have imagined before the Big 12 tournament began that KU would be facing the Mountaineers.

“Nah. We was definitely expecting Tech,” Lawson said. “Of course, everybody probably was. Just to kind of play them again — we lost to them by like 20 — so we wanted to play against them guys again,” he added, referencing KU’s 91-62 loss at Texas Tech on Feb. 23.

“But it’ll definitely be a competitive game,” Lawson said of facing a WVU team that upset Kansas in Morgantown, W.Va., back in January. “They’re not gonna quit. They’re gonna come out playing with a lot of intensity and very hard.”

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Postgame Report Card: Kansas 65, Texas 57

Kansas guard Quentin Grimes (5) and Texas guard Elijah Mitrou-Long (55) dive for a ball during the second half, Thursday, March 14, 2019 at Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo.

Kansas guard Quentin Grimes (5) and Texas guard Elijah Mitrou-Long (55) dive for a ball during the second half, Thursday, March 14, 2019 at Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo. by Nick Krug

Kansas City, Mo. — Grades for five aspects of the Kansas basketball team’s 65-57 win over Texas on Thursday night at Sprint Center.

Offense: B-

The offense was at its best when Devon Dotson was blowing past perimeter defenders to get to the paint, but not even his flashes of dominance were enough to keep Kansas firing on all cylinders for a full 40 minutes against a Texas team operating in NCAA Tournament bubble territory these days.

Remarkably, KU outscored Texas 17-0 in fastbreak points. It often had Dotson to thank for those high-percentage, energy-lifting scores.

Those numbers also set the Jayhawks up for a 34–20 advantage in points in the paint.

Kansas shot 41.8% from the field and only made 3 of 11 3-pointers, but helped itself out by going 16 of 22 at the foul line.

Defense: B

UT big Dylan Osetkowski (18 points, 3 for 7 on 3-pointers) was the only Longhorn that seemed too much for KU to handle.

The other Longhorns combined to shoot 14 for 43 from the floor.

It seemed UT would need to catch fire from long range to pull off a quarterfinal victory, but the Jayhawks held them to 8 for 25 on 3-pointers.

Frontcourt: B+

David McCormack spent stretches of his Big 12 tournament debut posting up like a man possessed, and with him overpowering UT bigs at times, his 13 points and 9 boards were critical components of the win.

Dedric Lawson didn’t have his most efficient night, shooting 6 for 15 on the way to 16 points. But he’s the type of offensive threat that just his presence on the court benefits those around him. And he hit a timely 3-pointer as a trailer during the second half, plus he chipped in 6 boards and a couple of steals and one block.

Backcourt: B-

Dotson (17 points, 4 assists) controlled the game more often than not offensively, and his assertiveness propelled KU into the semifinals.

Grimes’ shot was off much of the night (2 for 10). But he reached double figures with the help of a crucial second-half 3-pointer and a 7-for-8 showing at the foul line.

Ochai Agbaji was the low scorer among the starters, finishing with 2 points, 3 rebounds and 2 assists in 26 minutes.

Bench: C

Marcus Garrett accounted for all 5 of KU’s bench points and drew the praise of Bill Self after the win. Garrett also pitched in 8 rebounds and an assist in 20 minutes.

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