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Once Marcus Garrett is ready, transition should be smooth for Jayhawks

Texas guard Courtney Ramey (3) and Kansas guard Marcus Garrett chase a loose ball during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Monday, Jan. 14, 2019, in Lawrence, Kan. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

Texas guard Courtney Ramey (3) and Kansas guard Marcus Garrett chase a loose ball during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Monday, Jan. 14, 2019, in Lawrence, Kan. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

Losing a starter for five games in February isn’t exactly ideal for a college basketball team.

It’s this time of year when a season has the potential to turn, for better or worse, and fine-tuning lineups and roles can set a team up for a March Madness run.

Considering recent personnel developments for Kansas, the past couple of weeks have gone about as well as coach Bill Self could have hoped, with the exception of the Jayhawks’ Feb. 5 loss at rival Kansas State.

KU lost starting guard Marcus Garrett to an ankle injury on the same day the team learned that the NCAA ruled big man Silvio De Sousa ineligible. And somehow, even without Garrett, who is averaging 28.8 minutes a game as a sophomore, Kansas is 4-1 since.

Now comes the tricky part, right? Garrett this week finally has been able to participate in practices as he works closer to a return. But when Garrett was out, freshmen Devon Dotson and Ochai Agbaji emerged as reliable producers for Kansas. What happens to the chemistry and flow and momentum when the Jayhawks are reintegrating Garrett into the rotation, possibly as soon as this Saturday’s crucial road test at Texas Tech?

KU can’t afford for its newest difference-makers, Dotson and Agbaji, to hit a snag at this juncture. How does the team’s dynamic change when Garrett is able to return?

Self has a two-word answer to that question.

“It doesn’t.”

Neither Dotson nor Agbaji should miss a beat when KU’s rotation gains some much needed depth with Garrett.

“That’s not Marcus' role anyway,” Self said of what Dotson and Agbaji have been able to provide of late. “Marcus should blend in better than ever now, because he should have more help around him."

Prior to Garrett’s injury and Lagerald Vick’s leave of absence, KU was probably asking too much of Garrett, an awesome role player, but not a go-to scorer by any means at this stage of his career. There was a four-game stretch in January when Garrett was averaging more than 10 shot attempts a game, beginning with his 20-point outburst in a home win over Texas.

The Jayhawks no longer need him to do that. They need Garrett’s defense, his ball handling, his ability to drive and dish, and his overall basketball IQ. But now anything Garrett provides in the scoring column will feel like a bonus. Dedric Lawson, Dotson and Agbaji have proven themselves as a trio of reliable scorers, and with Garrett’s team-first approach on the court, those roles might even become easier for them once he’s back.

Imagine if a player with the physical presence of Udoka Azubuike were returning at this point of the regular season, with March just days away. Sure, the Jayhawks would be ecstatic to have the 7-footer back, but an adjustment period would be necessary for involved.

Shifting back to lineups featuring the versatile Garrett, who can defend guards and bigs alike and even give Dotson some breathers at point guard, will be straightforward as soon as he’s deemed game-ready.

You never want to lose a starter and then plug him back in late in the season while hoping for the best, but doing so with Garrett will be painless for the Jayhawks.

Reply 10 comments from Barry Weiss Jayscott Chad Smith Hudhawk Surrealku Dillon Davis Dane Pratt Robert  Brock Mike Greer Brett McCabe

Jayhawks experience new indoor practice facility for first time

None by Kansas Football

After nine months of construction time, the Kansas football program’s new indoor practice facility was finally ready to be put to use on Tuesday.

Returning players and spring enrollees were up bright and early for a 6 a.m. conditioning session on the full-length turf, sprinting and cutting as head coach Les Miles and his staff instructed and observed.

While spring practices won’t commence until March, the Jayhawks are able to work out without footballs while out of season at this time of the year. NCAA rules allow college football players 8 hours of work per week, with no more than 2 hours in a week spent reviewing game footage or walking through plays.

The other six hours are limited to conditioning and weightlifting, and Tuesday’s early morning workout was all about speed, changing directions and building the stamina the players will need for spring football. No skill instruction is allowed at this time of year, so there aren’t any footballs or blocking sleds or the types of drills one would expect to see at an in-season or spring practice.

But such workouts still hold great value for Miles and his assistants, as the staff members get a better understanding of their players’ individual abilities and how each Jayhawk approaches all that goes into playing at this level.

While there are still more bells and whistles to come for the indoor facility, with the playing turf ready to go, the Jayhawks got a sneak peek of the pristine venue on Monday, as donors Dana and Sue Anderson welcomed them to the space where the current and future players will spend countless hours in the months and years ahead.

In a video posted to KU football’s Twitter account, a number of Jayhawks offered their reactions to being inside the practice building for the first time.

“It’s a beautiful place,” senior receiver Daylon Charlot said. “We’re thankful for the opportunity for getting this. So we’re about to come in here and work hard every day.”

Junior quarterback Thomas MacVittie, one of the top signees from KU’s 2019 recruiting class, could be seen with his iPhone in hand, letting his father, Thomas Sr., get a live look of the facility via FaceTime.

“Man, this is something special,” the KU quarterback said. “This place is going up. It’s going to be fun.”

Between the social media posts provided by the football program, Jayhawks such as Najee Stevens McKenzie, Bryce Torneden, Corione Harris, Mike Lee, Hakeem Adeniji, Carter Stanley, Miles Kendrick, Quan Hampton, Evan Fairs, Elmore Hempstead Jr., Khalil Herbert, Codey Cole, MacVittie, Ezra Naylor and Andrew Parchment could be seen taking in and/or working out in the facility.

“This is beautiful right here. We love this,” redshirt junior cornerback Julian Chandler said in one of KU’s videos. “We’re ready to get some work in right here.”

Herbert, who served as the host for a live Instagram video of the players’ initial tour, enjoyed the bouncy feel to the fresh turf, as well as the prospect of staying warm and dry during workouts.

“It’s about to snow tomorrow, but that doesn’t matter to us,” Herbert said. “We’re fixing to be inside.”

Lee, who will be a senior safety this coming season, said it felt good to finally be inside the structure.

“We worked hard for this,” Lee said. “It’s about time we change this program around and get some dubs, and turn rock chalk nation to extreme.”

None by Kansas Football

Reply 2 comments from Dirk Medema Doug Roberts

Rejuvenated Dedric Lawson will be crucial in KU’s push for another Big 12 title

Kansas forward Dedric Lawson (1) drives to the bucket between West Virginia forward Derek Culver (1) and West Virginia guard Jermaine Haley (10) during the first half, Saturday, Feb. 16, 2019 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas forward Dedric Lawson (1) drives to the bucket between West Virginia forward Derek Culver (1) and West Virginia guard Jermaine Haley (10) during the first half, Saturday, Feb. 16, 2019 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

After spending much of the season’s first three months doing his best to carry the Kansas basketball team, things are finally beginning to settle down for Dedric Lawson.

Not only has the emergence of freshmen guards Devon Dotson and Ochai Agbaji meant the Jayhawks can actually win games without Lawson scoring 20-plus points and registering a double-double, KU’s leading scorer and rebounder will get some hard-earned time off in the days ahead.

During the last week of January, Kansas dropped back-to-back games at Kentucky and Texas, and Lawson spent much of both defeats getting bodied and pushed around by opposing bigs, who often doubled him inside and wore him down.

But the redshirt junior forward from Memphis, Tenn., who has spent more time on the perimeter in the five games since the loss at Texas, said he hasn’t felt as beat-up lately.

“I haven’t been as sore just after the game. I’ve been doing a lot of different things to take care of my body and things of that nature, like cold tub, hot tub, things like that,” Lawson said after contributing 14 points and 4 rebounds to KU’s 78-53 win over West Virginia on Saturday at Allen Fieldhouse. “Sometimes, we have a quick turnaround from Saturday, then to Monday. You don’t really have as much time to put your body into treatment.”

That won’t be the case this week. Lawson and the Jayhawks (20-6 overall, 9-4 Big 12) get a full seven days between their WVU win and a crucial road matchup at Texas Tech, the team with which they’re currently tied for second in the Big 12 standings, a half-game behind first-place Kansas State (19-6, 9-3).

It seems KU’s longest break in the schedule since late December couldn’t have come at a better time. Then again, is there ever a bad time to have a week off?

“That’s a good question,” Lawson said. “It’s a good time because, hopefully, it gives Marcus (Garrett, injured ankle) time to come back. I’d say it’s definitely a good time for all of our pieces to get healthy and for us to go into Texas Tech all together as a team, and go in there and be able to compete with all of our guys.”

Even if Lawson doesn’t want to admit it, his head coach, Bill Self, said several times on Saturday that he thinks KU’s multiskilled, 6-foot-9 forward has looked tired. Lawson is averaging 33 minutes a game this year, and providing Kansas with 19.2 points and 10.3 rebounds, plus 50.6-percent shooting. Between the effort he exerts and the amount of defensive attention he receives from KU’s opponents, it’s enough to overtax even a physically and mentally prepared athlete.

KU’s victory over WVU marked the team’s fifth game in 15 days. Lawson said he has felt more vigorous than may be expected because the team’s head trainer, Bill Cowgill, puts all of the Jayhawks in position to recover — “keeping guys fresh and keeping them not so banged up,” as Lawson put it.

Only five games remain now on the Jayhawks’ regular-season schedule, and running the table would qualify as an exceedingly tall task. But that’s the surest path to another Big 12 title for Kansas. And it’s far more feasible now than it looked a couple of weeks ago.

A rejuvenated Lawson, more capable of finishing inside, draining 3-pointers outside and cleaning the glass coming off a seven-day break, could carry KU to a fantastic finish to the season.

His load to bear won’t feel so heavy, either, now that he’s facing up instead of posting down low, and has Dotson and Agbaji co-starring with him in the Jayhawks’ late-season push.

Reply 7 comments from Dane Pratt Surrealku Len Shaffer Navyhawk Joe Ross Mlbenn35

Postgame Report Card: Kansas 78, WVU 53

Kansas forward Mitch Lightfoot (44) battles in the paint for a ball with West Virginia forward Andrew Gordon (12) during the first half, Saturday, Feb. 16, 2019 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas forward Mitch Lightfoot (44) battles in the paint for a ball with West Virginia forward Andrew Gordon (12) during the first half, Saturday, Feb. 16, 2019 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

Quick grades for five aspects of the Kansas basketball team’s 78-53 win over West Virginia on Saturday at Allen Fieldhouse.

Offense: B

To the Jayhawks’ credit they rarely let up or faltered in cruising to an afternoon victory. More importantly, they didn’t play down to their competition and looked like they were playing one of the Big 12’s lesser teams throughout, rather than making the types of mistakes that would benefit the underdog Mountaineers.

Kansas shot 53 percent from the field, went 8 for 20 on 3-pointers and finished with 17 assists on 28 baskets.

Defense: A

Great defensive activity in the first half, both inside and out, made sure the Mountaineers didn’t get comfortable.

WVU began the game hitting just 3 of its first 15 shots, as KU’s guards and bigs opened the afternoon locked in and ready to compete.

Kansas was able to gain its first double-digit lead less than 9 minutes in as the Jayhawks contested just about every shot WVU could manage to get up early on.

The Mountaineers turned the ball over 12 times in the first half and shot 7 for 28 in the opening 20 minutes, allowing KU to hit halftime in total control, up 43-16.

WVU finished the loss shooting 34 percent from the floor, with 24 turnovers.

Frontcourt: B-

It wasn’t a banner day for Dedric Lawson, but the Jayhawks didn’t need him to dominate, either. A ho-hum game by Lawson’s standards, KU’s typical go-to guy went for 14 points, 4 rebounds and 2 assists.

Lawson was engaged, he just seemed to willingly take on a supportive role with KU rolling.

Starting for the third game in a row and for the third time in his young career, David McCormack made his presence felt on the defensive end of the floor in the first half. McCormack (10 points, 4 rebounds) swatted 2 WVU shots in the opening 5 minutes.

The big man showed some promising footwork early on, too, taking what looked to be a possible turnover on the baseline under the basket, and working his way to a tough finish and layup.

Backcourt: A-

The freshman trio of Devon Dotson, Quentin Grimes and Ochai Agbaji made a ludicrous start for Kansas possible with their efforts on the defensive end of the floor. Between ball pressure and staying assignment sound the Jayhawks’ guards kept WVU in check throughout the first half.

Dotson (15 points, 8 assists, 5 rebounds) picked up on Saturday right where he left off at TCU this past Monday, going for 13 points in the first half. With Dotson taking an assertive approach at point guard, it was easy for the rest of the Jayhawks to follow his lead.

Even when Agbaji (10 points, 3 rebounds) wasn’t scoring consistently in the first half, he made KU better offensively just by pushing the ball in the open floor when he could and driving hard into the paint against poor closeouts.

Grimes (4 points, 2 assists) missed all four of his 3-point attempts, but helped KU out a great deal with his perimeter defense and passing in the first half.

Bench: A-

K.J. Lawson, like Dotson, kept his positive momentum rolling from KU’s road win in Fort Worth, Texas, earlier in the week.

K.J. (15 points, 3 rebounds) drained a 3 from the left corner on the way to 7 first-half points.

Mitch Lightfoot didn’t start but KU relied on its backup big man more than it did McCormack, and Lightfoot delivered his typical energy and hustle plays on both ends of the floor. Lightfoot (5 points, 7 rebounds, 3 blocks), with his activity, even if it was just coming through with a hard foul to make sure WVU didn’t get an easy basket inside, continued to be a vital part of the Jayhawks’ rotation.

Reply 4 comments from Cassadys Kall3742 Brad Avery Gary McCullough

New starting role doesn’t mean David McCormack trying to play like ‘superstar’

Kansas forward David McCormack (33) is hounded by Oklahoma State forward Duncan Demuth (5) and Oklahoma State forward Cameron McGriff (12) during the first half, Saturday, Feb. 9, 2019 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas forward David McCormack (33) is hounded by Oklahoma State forward Duncan Demuth (5) and Oklahoma State forward Cameron McGriff (12) during the first half, Saturday, Feb. 9, 2019 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

Before the season began, not a whole lot was expected out of David McCormack during his freshman year with the Kansas basketball program.

It wasn’t that the 6-foot-10 forward from prep powerhouse Oak Hill Academy lacked potential. It was just that McCormack was joining what looked like a very crowded frontcourt, with 7-footer Udoka Azubuike, 6-9 forwards Dedric Lawson and Silvio De Sousa and 6-8 Mitch Lightfoot all possesing more experience than the freshman.

Of course, McCormack’s expectations have changed significantly since then. Azubuike suffered a season-ending wrist injury and De Sousa was ruled ineligible by the NCAA. What’s more, as KU lost two potential starting guards for an unknown amount of time due to Marcus Garrett’s injured ankle and Lagerald Vick’s leave of absence, all of the sudden Kansas needed McCormack — now.

After not playing a single minute in KU’s road loss at Kansas State on Feb. 5, McCormack was thrust into the starting lineup. The freshman big man went from rarely playing 10 minutes in a game to hearing his name called during pre-game introductions.

The Jayhawks (19-6 overall, 8-4 Big 12) are 2-0 with McCormack in the starting five, with wins against OSU and TCU. But that doesn’t mean his transition to a new role has been easy.

As McCormack continues getting used to starting he said both Azubuike and De Sousa have helped him out by offering up some advice.

“Don’t try to go out and make home run plays and be a superstar,” said McCormack, relating their message. “Just do what you know how to do and do what you do best, and you can work your way up to doing things like that. That’ll benefit the team in the times that it counts.”

Playing alongside more established members of KU’s rotation, McCormack hasn’t been asked to do much. Through his first two starts he’s scored 4 total points (with all of them coming at TCU) while playing a combined 31 minutes. He’s just 1 for 6 from the floor as a starter, but is averaging 4.0 rebounds a game, plus 1.0 blocks and no turnovers.

Sometimes McCormack is running so hard or such a ball of energy inside while positioning for a rebound or posting up that it appears he’s trying to do too much. His shots inside have looked hurried, too, and sometimes the ball gets away from his hands as he goes after a rebound or entry pass.

Effort and want-to clearly aren’t issues for him. McCormack said what he must continue to work on is slowing things down.

“I know right now I’m not the playmaker type, the go-to guy,” he said. “But I know if I need to set a ball screen or get a specific rebound that’s my job to do and make sure I do that properly.”

KU coach Bill Self has praised one such aspect of McCormack’s impact repeatedly. The freshman’s footwork allows him to defend ball screens effectively on the perimeter.

The 6-10, 265-pound forward said he’s been working on his ball screen defense “a while,” predating his time at KU.

“I knew that was going to be a big thing, coming into college, just working on my lateral movement and speed,” McCormack said, adding coaches and Azubuike talk with him regularly about little things that can make him even more functional in that role. “Getting out and hedging the ball screen but making sure I get back quick, as well.”

With only six games left in the regular season, McCormack is currently one of four freshmen starting for KU — though that could change when Garrett is cleared to play.

Self and his staff ask much more of guards Devon Dotson, Ochai Agbaji and Quentin Grimes than they do of McCormack. But the big man who was a McDonald’s All-American just a year ago is happy to be contributing with his fellow freshmen.

“Other than youthfulness I think we all bring energy in our own way,” McCormack said. “Devon is just speedy, fast. You know, he does what he can in leading. And as you can see, Ochai, coach says he has like a model-type smile. He always has great energy, great positivity. I just bring as much energy as I can as far as rebounding. And Q just tries to bring people together, as well. So I think we just connect people in our own way.”

At some point, everything will begin clicking for McCormack, and he’ll provide KU with even more. Maybe it will happen this season, or maybe it will show when he’s a sophomore. In the meantime, he’ll keep doing the little things that can help, as advised by the big men who were supposed to be playing in front of him this season.

Reply 12 comments from Ndomer70 Surrealku Boardshorts Jim Stauffer West_virginia_hawk Shannon Gustafson Allin Herring Layne Pierce Robert  Brock Jaylark and 1 others

Even without Lagerald Vick, Jayhawks capable of producing from 3-point range

Kansas forward Dedric Lawson (1) puts up a three over Oklahoma State forward Cameron McGriff (12) during the first half, Saturday, Feb. 9, 2019 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas forward Dedric Lawson (1) puts up a three over Oklahoma State forward Cameron McGriff (12) during the first half, Saturday, Feb. 9, 2019 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

At no point in the past couple of weeks did Bill Self give his team a directive to shoot more 3-pointers.

But since the calendar flipped to February, the Jayhawks have definitely been more ready and likely to fire away from beyond the arc.

On the season, KU is averaging 20.7 3-point attempts per game with a 35.9% success rate. Through 12 Big 12 games, the Jayhawks are averaging 21.4 3-point tries and hitting 35.8%. But in the past four games, KU is hoisting 27.3 per game from downtown and connecting on 36.7% of those looks.

The upward trend began after Kansas only took 18 3-pointers in its double-digit loss at Texas. As Self pointed out during his weekly press conference on Thursday, the escalation in attempts wasn’t as much a shift in philosophy as it was a byproduct of another type of adjustment.

“We will shoot more 3’s if Dedric plays away from the basket,” Self said, “because that’s another guy that can shoot a 3 away from the basket. We’ve shot more. But I do believe that Dedric has contributed to that, because he’s probably shooting four or five a game himself, where he was probably averaging one a game before that. That could be it.”

Indeed, since Self tweaked the offense to relocate Lawson to the perimeter, the redshirt junior big man has shot 9 for 19 from 3-point range in the past four games. In the 21 games before that Lawson went a combined 11 for 39, attempting only 1.9 3-pointers a game.

With Lawson providing No. 14 Kansas (19-6 overall, 8-4 Big 12) with a new offensive wrinkle, the Jayhawks made a season-high 13 from deep in beating Texas Tech, and with 11 makes against Oklahoma State, KU hit double figures in 3-pointers for just the fifth time this season.

Kansas guard Ochai Agbaji (30) puts up a three from the corner over Oklahoma State guard Isaac Likekele (13) during the second half, Saturday, Feb. 9, 2019 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas guard Ochai Agbaji (30) puts up a three from the corner over Oklahoma State guard Isaac Likekele (13) during the second half, Saturday, Feb. 9, 2019 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

Obviously Lawson hasn’t done this all by himself. As the Jayhawks also have adjusted to playing without Marcus Garrett (injured ankle) and Lagerald Vick (leave of absence), Lawson and three oh his teammates have put up between four and five 3-pointers apiece during the past four games:

  • Lawson, 9 for 19

  • Ochai Agbaji, 8 for 19

  • Devon Dotson, 8 for 17

  • Quentin Grimes, 7 for 21

  • Rest of the team, 8 for 33

Self isn’t complaining about his team’s increased reliance on the 3-point arc. Even though freshman guard Grimes, as KU’s coach put it, “hasn’t really gotten on a roll yet offensively,” Grimes took a team-high eight 3-pointers at TCU earlier this week.

It was the second-most long-range attempts in a game for Grimes this season, a campaign that began with him going 6 for 10 against Michigan State.

“But they were good looks,” Self said of Grimes’ 1-for-8 night at TCU. “They were open.”

In that same Big Monday victory, Dotson delivered a career-high four 3-pointers on a career-high seven attempts. And the third freshman guard in the starting lineup, Agbaji, went 2 for 6.

Overall, KU went 9 for 30 from distance in Fort Worth, Texas. It was just the second time this season the Jayhawks attempted 30 3-pointers, and the other came three games earlier, in a home win over Texas Tech (13 for 30).

“Maybe confidence with the young guys is probably a reason why,” Self hypothesized of another factor in KU’s 3-point attempts being on the rise. “But I also think Dedric playing away from the basket.”

Kansas guard Quentin Grimes (5) puts up a three over Kansas State guard Kamau Stokes (3) during the first half, Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2019 at Bramlage Coliseum.

Kansas guard Quentin Grimes (5) puts up a three over Kansas State guard Kamau Stokes (3) during the first half, Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2019 at Bramlage Coliseum. by Nick Krug

Perhaps the Jayhawks are just riding the wave created by a pre-game video message from Devonte’ Graham, who told them before the Texas Tech win something along the lines of, “I don’t care what coach says. Shoot the ball.”

Whatever it is, it seems to be working for these Jayhawks. As they head into the home stretch of the regular season, while they’ll need to connect at a better clip than the 30% that they shot in their win at TCU, the absence of their best 3-point shooter, Vick (66 for 145), hasn’t led to a noticeable dropoff in productivity in that category.

In part, that’s because KU’s other 3-point threats are more likely to take open looks now than they were earlier in the season.

“I feel like everybody’s getting a lot more comfortable with the offense,” Grimes said, “and what we can do out there from a standpoint of what coach wants, and then from an individual standpoint of what we can do out there on the court.”

Grimes, who is 33 for 100 on the season and 17 for 53 in Big 12 play, said the Jayhawks just need to take good shots. That means not rushing their 3-pointers, or taking them early in the shot clock, or when two defenders are closing and an extra pass is available.

“I feel like all the shots that we’ve been taking have been pretty good shots, even if they’re misses,” Grimes said of KU’s recent 3-point shot selection.

His teammates have said all season that Grimes is one of the best shooters on the team. And he may in fact prove himself to be one in the weeks ahead.

In the meantime, with no timetable for Vick’s return in place, it is becoming clear that KU has other reliable shooters. As Nick Schwerdt, host of KLWN’s “Rock Chalk Sports Talk” recently pointed out, Vick isn’t the only Jayhawk ranked among the Big 12 leaders in 3-point shooting during conference play.

None by Nick Schwerdt

Three active Jayhawks, in fact, are shooting 40% or better in league games:

  • Dotson, 13 for 30 (43.3%)

  • Agbaji, 14 for 33 (42.4%)

  • Lawson, 14 for 35 (40%)

With or without Vick, Kansas has capable 3-point shooters. And, more importantly, they are more comfortable and confident in taking those shots now.

When Dotson, Agbaji and Lawson are open beyond the arc, consider it a successful offensive possession every time they shoot.

And remember: open 3-pointers for Grimes are good shots, too. KU needs to get the freshman into a groove sooner rather than later, and he’s never going to get there without being assertive.

The Jayhawks are going to need 3-pointers to peak offensively, so they may as well embrace the concept of taking them when they’re open.

Reply 2 comments from Ronfranklin Surrealku

Jayhawks showed some vital mental toughness by winning on road

Kansas guard Devon Dotson, top, and TCU guard Alex Robinson, bottom, wrestle for control of a loose ball in the first half of an NCAA college basketball game in Fort Worth, Texas, Monday, Feb. 11, 2019. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)

Kansas guard Devon Dotson, top, and TCU guard Alex Robinson, bottom, wrestle for control of a loose ball in the first half of an NCAA college basketball game in Fort Worth, Texas, Monday, Feb. 11, 2019. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez) by Tony Gutierrez/AP Photo

As currently comprised, the Kansas roster is too flawed overall for the Jayhawks to play the type of aesthetically pleasing basketball that has characterized so many of their predecessors coached by Bill Self.

But they have now proven, most importantly to themselves, that they can offset some of their depth, ball handling and shooting deficiencies with one of the qualities that their coach appreciates most.

By winning on the road for a change Monday night at TCU, and withstanding the Horned Frogs’ late rally when they’ve collapsed under similar circumstances earlier this season, the Jayhawks displayed some true mental toughness.

When so many other away games took turns in the wrong direction for KU in the final minutes of regulation, scrapping to overcome those potentially haunting memories made what the group accomplished while plagued by foul trouble late in Fort Worth, Texas, all the more extraordinary.

A familiar KU imperfection reared its ugly head late in the second half, as what was once a 12-point lead with 9 minutes to go completely disappeared by the 2:48 mark of regulation, with the Jayhawks gift-wrapping the Horned Frogs’ surge with 7 turnovers in a little more than 6 minutes.

“We knew the crowd was getting into it,” freshman point guard Devon Dotson said of what had all the trademarks of a devastating, outcome-swinging run for TCU, “and, you know, we made some silly mistakes, myself included. But we just wanted to stay together. We said all week, just keep trusting in one another and keep battling and everything will work out.”

Even down 4 with 2:07 left in regulation, this team, which prior to Monday had only won on the road this season by building a massive second-half lead at Baylor, found a way to crawl out of a self-dug hole during crunch time on an opponent’s court. Huge, must-have rebounds from Quentin Grimes and Dedric Lawson set the stage for clutch scores from both Lawson brothers, Dedric and K.J., to force overtime.

And even though KU got out in front by 5 midway through OT, the outcome wasn’t sealed until the breakout star of the night, Dotson, willed his team to a victory.

Attacking off a ball screen set by David McCormack (bigs Dedric Lawson and Mitch Lightfoot both already had fouled out), Dotson attacked the paint with Kansas up 1 in the final minute of the extra period. While drawing a foul en route to the hoop, Dotson landed on his backside, where he grimaced in pain, letting out a brief scream.

“I was kind of scared,” Ochai Agbaji shared of his initial reaction to seeing Dotson down on the floor with the game in the balance. “But I knew he has cramped, like, earlier in the season, before, but he’s played through it. He’s tough.”

Indeed, the pain Dotson felt from the fall was accompanied by some cramping, what with Dotson being the only player on either roster to take part in all 45 minutes of the conference battle.

The freshman point guard said Self told him in that moment, “You got it. Knock ’em down.”

And the point guard did just that, burying both free throws for a 3-point lead.

“I just wanted to get the win,” Dotson said. “Just lock in and take it one at a time, just knock it down.”

His desire to make that happen showed up two more times in OT, as Dotson finished 6 for 6 at the foul line in the final 40 seconds.

“That's a big momentum swing,” Dotson said of the pressure free throws that he considered a necessity while not allowing the moment to overwhelm him. “If they foul us and we miss those, that’s basically just giving them the ball.”

The resolve shown by Dotson and his teammates allowed Kansas (19-6 overall, 8-4 Big 12) to snap its four-game road losing skid and stay in the thick of the hunt for the Big 12 title.

Kansas head coach Bill Self instructs his team in the first half of an NCAA college basketball game against TCU in Fort Worth, Texas, Monday, Feb. 11, 2019. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)

Kansas head coach Bill Self instructs his team in the first half of an NCAA college basketball game against TCU in Fort Worth, Texas, Monday, Feb. 11, 2019. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)

So just how positive was Self feeling about the players’ toughness?

“I feel good that we came back after we gave it up. But I didn’t feel good that the toughness was so good as we gave it up,” Self pointed out.

Even so, Self admitted KU had a “pretty makeshift lineup” on the floor after Dedric Lawson, Lightfoot and Grimes had fouled out: Dotson, Agbaji, Charlie Moore, McCormack and K.J. Lawson.

“And those guys hung in there,” Self said. “They did some good things.”

No one looked mentally tougher in the critical road victory than redshirt sophomore K.J. Lawson. The man was averaging only 9 minutes a game before circumstances allowed him to be on the floor in crunch time. And he wasn’t remotely scared of the spotlight, scoring the shot that forced OT in the final 30 seconds of the second half and putting Kansas ahead for good with another basket in the extra period.

K.J. said the Jayhawks’ second road win on the season has the potential to make them a mentally tougher team moving forward.

“That’s definitely like a motivational builder for the road,” he said. “When you win one on the road, you believe you can win one. But when you lose, you get a little doubt in your mind, when you’re coming down the stretch and you blew a couple games — any player will tell you that.”

Only six games remain for KU in the regular season, and half of them will be on the road: at Texas Tech, Oklahoma State and Oklahoma. Now that they’ve fought their way to a conference victory in an opposing arena, the Jayhawks have that experience to fall back on, that reminder that they are tough enough to endure the home team’s counterpunch and come out on the other side successfully.

If the Jayhawks end up clawing their way to another Big 12 championship by the end of the regular season, their overtime win at TCU will stand out as a defining turning point that made it possible, because it was on that Big Monday stage that the players proved to themselves that they have more tenacity about them than it once seemed.

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Postgame Report Card: Kansas 82, TCU 77 (OT)

TCU guard RJ Nembhard, front, and Kansas guard Charlie Moore (2) wrestle on the floor for control of a loose ball in the first half of an NCAA college basketball game in Fort Worth, Texas, Monday, Feb. 11, 2019. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)

TCU guard RJ Nembhard, front, and Kansas guard Charlie Moore (2) wrestle on the floor for control of a loose ball in the first half of an NCAA college basketball game in Fort Worth, Texas, Monday, Feb. 11, 2019. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez) by Tony Gutierrez/AP Photo

Fort Worth, Texas — Grades for five aspects of the Kansas basketball team’s 82-77 overtime win over TCU on Big Monday at Schollmaier Arena.

Offense: B-

The offense was just effective enough for the Jayhawks to get out of their third trip to Texas this season with their second road victory to date.

KU hit 9 of its 30 3-pointers while connecting on 19 of its 38 2-pointers.

The visitors helped themselves out by keeping pace with TCU inside, where Kansas was only outscored 36-34 in the paint.

As we’ve seen on a number of occasions this year, KU finished with more turnovers (15) than assists (13).

The key, of course, proved to be timely baskets and some crunch time free-throw makes, the latter coming courtesy of freshman point guard Devon Dotson.

KU made 17 of 23 at the foul line in the win.

Defense: B+

The biggest defensive accomplishment for KU in this one might have been the way the Jayhawks kept a potential 3-point killer from going off.

While Kouat Noi scored 14 points, the Horned Frogs’ best shooter struggled from 3-point range, making only 1 of 9.

TCU never was able to deliver the type of prolonged outburst it needed to win, and give KU’s defense credit for that.

The Frogs only shot 38% from the field on 71 attempts for the night. KU held TCU to 36.4% shooting in the second half, as well as a 1-for-7 performance in overtime.

The Jayhawks won the battle of the glass, too, outrebounding TCU 49-43 in the crucial road victory.

Frontcourt: C+

It wasn’t one of Dedric Lawson’s more impressive games, and he still finished with a double-double (14 points, 10 rebounds).

But it took him a while to get going and he shot 6 for 16 from the field before fouling out with 2:26 left in OT.

Freshman David McCormack started again. And he once again played hard. But his energy only translated to 4 points and 4 rebounds in 17 minutes — and he only played several of those minutes due to foul trouble for Lawson and Mitch Lightfoot.

Backcourt: B+

Freshmen Dotson (career-highs of 25 points and 10 rebounds to go with 5 assists) and Ochai Agbaji (20 points, 10 rebounds) were the stars of the night for Kansas.

Agbaji’s activity in everything he did gave KU energy and confidence, while Dotson’s ability to handle 45 minutes and only show fleeting signs of weakness keyed a win that feels like it could help the team turn a corner.

Quentin Grimes chipped in with 4 assists, but only scored 5 points on 2-for-11 shooting as KU played without injured Marcus Garrett again.

Bench: A-

KU couldn’t have won without K.J. Lawson, who scored the basket that sent it to overtime, as well as the one that gave the Jayhawks the lead for good in the extra period. And he looked poised and confident in doing so.

Lawson’s 10 points and 3 rebounds in 16 minutes made him a standout performer, even though he rarely gets much of an opportunity to play.

Lightfoot again started the second half, and his interior defense helped KU build a double-digit lead in the second half. The junior added 4 points and 6 boards before fouling out in 22 minutes.

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Postgame Report Card: Kansas 84, Oklahoma State 72

Kansas forward David McCormack (33) is hounded by Oklahoma State forward Duncan Demuth (5) and Oklahoma State forward Cameron McGriff (12) during the first half, Saturday, Feb. 9, 2019 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas forward David McCormack (33) is hounded by Oklahoma State forward Duncan Demuth (5) and Oklahoma State forward Cameron McGriff (12) during the first half, Saturday, Feb. 9, 2019 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

Quick grades for five aspects of the Kansas basketball team’s 84-72 win over Oklahoma State on Saturday at Allen Fieldhouse.

Offense: B+

A slow start from 3-point range kept KU from building anything larger than a 6-point lead in the first half. Then the Jayhawks needed some late-half 3-pointers from Ochai Agbaji to head into the locker room tied with the Cowboys.

KU wasn’t finding a lot of easy baskets in the paint in the first 20 minutes, when they scored just 12 inside, leading to the tight game against the Big 12’s ninth-place team.

But the Jayhawks opened up the second half by establishing Dedric Lawson as a focal point and high-percentage looks and some needed energy followed for the Jayhawks.

KU shot 51.5 percent from the floor in the final 20 minutes.

Defense: B-

Some defensive breakdowns late in the first half allowed OSU to score easily and head to halftime with some confidence.

While Kansas didn’t allow OSU to take a ton of 3-pointers, the defense often left the Cowboys’ most capable shooters open for great looks when they did take them. The Cowboys shot 9 for 20 from long range and the makes always seemed timely.

Ultimately OSU wasn’t able to hoist enough 3-point bombs to keep pace with the home team, and the Cowboys shot 38 percent from the floor in the second half.

Frontcourt: B+

Although David McCormack made the first start of his career, it was, of course, Dedric Lawson who did most of the damage inside for Kansas.

Lawson began to take over in the second half, exactly when KU needed him to. His smooth finishing and shooting touch were on full display, but so was his passing, decision-making and feel for the game, as the Jayhawks’ most talented player put up 25 points, 7 rebounds and 5 assists.

McCormack had trouble making much of an impact early, though his energy and effort and want-to was plenty evident.

The freshman’s 10 first-half minutes netted 1 rebound and 0 points. By the end of the game, McCormack had played just 4 more minutes and had 0 points and 5 boards to show for his starting debut.

Backcourt: B+

Playing without two potential starters in Marcus Garrett (injured ankle) and Lagerald Vick (leave of absence), Kansas went with a three-guard lineup versus the Cowboys.

Devon Dotson’s innate ability to find steals and take off the other way for a bucket reached new heights in the first half, when the freshman delivered the first dunk of his KU career. A few minutes later he had an even more impressive finish on a layup, because he was challenged this time, by OSU big Yor Anei, and finished off glass over the 6-foot-10 freshman.

With Vick out of the mix, Kansas definitely needs someone stepping up in the scoring department and Dotson did his part Saturday, putting up 18 points to go with his 4 assists and 5 rebounds.

Fellow freshman Ochai Agbaji, one of four freshmen in the starting lineup, was even better in that department, providing the offense with a real boost, as well. Agbaji (23 points, 5-for-7 on 3-pointers, 6 rebounds) drained 3 of 4 from 3-point range in the first half, as KU entered the locker room tied with the Cowboys at 36.

Freshman Quentin Grimes (6 points, 4 rebounds) had a difficult start to his day, twice called for a charge while trying to be aggressive off the dribble. He didn’t score until the 12:20 mark of the second half, but his contributions proved timely, as a pair of 3-pointers in a little more than a minute, out of a timeout, pushed KU’s lead to 8.

Bench: B

Mitch Lightfoot and Charlie Moore were the first players off KU’s bench, and got in much earlier than they would have a couple of weeks back, when they were at the end of the rotation.

Lightfoot (6 points, 9 rebounds, 2 blocks) pleased the crowd in the first half by going all out for a tough defensive rebound at one point and later on challenging Cameron McGriff for a would-be highlight dunk that ended a foul.

Lightfoot, who started the second half in place of McCormack, got the half off to an electric start on defense by smothering a would-be Anei dunk attempt up in the air.

Moore came out firing off the bench, but was 1 for 5 in the first half and missed all 3 of his 3-point tries. The redshirt sophomore finished with 4 points.

Reply 3 comments from Dane Pratt Roger Ortega Dirk Medema

Trials and tribulations piling up for Jayhawks this season

Kansas head coach Bill Self gets heated after a call agains the Jayhawks during the second half, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas head coach Bill Self gets heated after a call agains the Jayhawks during the second half, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

Perhaps because he’s spent so much of this season in college basketball’s version of crisis management mode, Bill Self on Friday afternoon turned one question about the at times tedious nature of a season into a nearly 3-minute long public service announcement about the state of the Kansas basketball team.

Whether it was the Jayhawks’ four losses in their last six games (with all the defeats coming on the road), dealing with another injury to a starter, having a senior guard take a leave of absence in February, or, you know, the whole Silvio De Sousa fiasco that had him revved up, Self’s state of mind during an otherwise typical media session fueled a monologue.

In his career, Self was asked outside the locker room in Allen Fieldhouse, when he has sensed that basketball has become tedious to his players, how does he help them recapture “the joy?”

“It happens with every team. And I think that’s kind of an unfair question, because you’re stating it right after losses, and that’s when everything is magnified,” Self began in his response. “Positively it can be magnified if you win and negatively it can be magnified if you don’t. And 50 percent of the teams that play each and every night lose. So the whole thing is you can’t let things become situations because of disappointment in a short-term deal. Is it hard to get players to understand that and do that? Absolutely. We haven’t experienced that a lot here. But it is a situation where all teams go through something — they all go through something.”

The trials and tribulations seem to keep piling up on the perennial Big 12 champions this season, Self’s 16th at KU.

From the significant fallout to De Sousa’s recruitment, to Udoka Azubuike’s season-ending wrist injury, to Marcus Garrett’s less serious ankle injury that is expected to keep him out yet again as the Jayhawks play host to Oklahoma State, to Lagerald Vick’s out of the blue leave of absence, there have been no shortage of pitfalls in the chase for the program’s 15th consecutive conference title.

By the way, don’t even bring that up. Not right now anyway.

“It’s not right to talk about the league race, because right now we’re not even in the league race — at least the way I see it,” Self said. “Until we start, you know, doing some things to create some positive energy and wins moving forward, because there’s so little margin for error.”

Kansas forward Dedric Lawson (1) reacts after being called for a charge during the first half, Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2019 at Bramlage Coliseum.

Kansas forward Dedric Lawson (1) reacts after being called for a charge during the first half, Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2019 at Bramlage Coliseum. by Nick Krug

No. 13 KU (17-6 overall, 6-4 Big 12) enters the weekend sitting 1.5 games behind the Big 12’s current leader, Kansas State, 1 game behind second-place Iowa State, a half-game behind third-place Baylor and tied for fourth with Texas Tech in the five-team jumble atop the standings.

A win against Oklahoma State (9-13, 2-7) is a must for the Jayhawks, but it won’t do anything to improve the national perception of this team. Kansas has dropped in the AP Top 25 each of the past four weeks, and next week will be no different, regardless of Saturday’s outcome.

The constant unrest that has characterized this season, Self wanted to remind everyone, has pushed KU out of college basketball’s upper echelon.

“The thing about it is that I don’t think people understand on the outside: we’re not the same team we were when we were preseason No. 1 in the country,” Self said. “I mean, we’re not. We’ve got four of our top seven players (Azubuike, Garrett, Vick, De Sousa), most talented players, who are not going to be in uniform tomorrow. So naturally we’re not the same team. So do we temper expectations? I’m not sure I buy into that. But we’ve also got to be a little bit realistic knowing that when you have less margin for error there’s a greater chance that something negative can happen, such as not winning the game.”

In KU’s current reality, which at least will get a boost when Garrett is able to return, perhaps in a week, a Big 12 title isn’t a foregone conclusion for a change. You can talk yourself into this being the year the streak ends as easily as you can that it will continue.

The challenge for Self, who said they can’t make excuses, will be getting the players to tighten up every aspect of what they do, what with those aforementioned slim margins.

And when KU inevitably endures another loss?

“You can’t approach the next day like it’s the end of the earth,” Self said, “because there’s a pretty good chance that could’ve happened anyway.”

It’s not as if, Self pointed out, KU has the personnel of the Boston Celtics. If he was coaching that type of talent, he would be more concerned about the team’s 1-5 road record.

“But we don’t have that right now,” he said. “And certainly you can’t hold the players accountable to a level that when the other team tries just as hard and they have all their pieces and they’re already just as good, something bad could potentially happen.”

Those negative outcomes have become a road-game trend for this team during what has been a tumultuous first few months to the season by KU basketball standards. The Jayhawks shouldn’t have much trouble getting another home win on Saturday. But until they start proving they can play with the type of consistency that has lacked throughout the season’s first 23 games, the ceiling for this team will keep looking lower and lower.

“In order to win games that are against good teams you have to play on that particular night, at that particular moment, on that particular possession,” Self said. “And we just haven’t been doing that enough.”

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