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Oklahoma coach Lincoln Riley won’t start Baker Mayfield vs. West Virginia

The sixth-grade Hurricanes and Cougars shake hands before the coin toss. The Hurricanes got the ball first Oct. 9 at Youth Sports Inc.

The sixth-grade Hurricanes and Cougars shake hands before the coin toss. The Hurricanes got the ball first Oct. 9 at Youth Sports Inc. by natalie-flanzer

Baker Mayfield will not start and for a game not serve as team captain in Oklahoma’s regular-season finale vs. West Virginia on Saturday, Sooners coach Lincoln Riley announced at his Monday press conference.

The punishment stems from him twice grabbing his crotch and sending F-bombs across the field at the Kansas sideline.

Kyler Murray, who in a 41-3 victory over Kansas averaged 11 yards on three rushes and completed 3 of 5 passes for 55 yards, will start in place of Mayfield.

“This program has very high standards and when they’re met, there are going to be consequences,” Riley said.

When talking about the qualities he finds special in Mayfield and how proud he is to coach him, Riley grew teary-eyed and needed to take a 30-second break from talking to compose himself.

Kansas coach David Beaty holds his weekly presser on Tuesdays. It will be interesting to see how he answers questions about whether his three captains will be disciplined in any way for not shaking Mayfield’s extended right hand during the pre-game coin toss.

Beaty did not appear overly concerned about the snub after the game, but during Monday’s Big 12 conference call the third-year coach (3-32 overall, 1-31 vs FBS schools) apologized on behalf of his team and shared that he believes Dorance Armstrong, Joe Dineen and Daniel Wise “care deeply” about representing KU and the football program in a “classy” manner and that they’re “great men” who made a mistake.

Reply 12 comments from Hawkfan9675 Tom Keegan Dale Rogers Metaljhawk Brett McCabe Jmfitz85 Hawktalker5 Len Shaffer Sasquatch2310 Ronfranklin

Numbers say Kansas weakest of 65 power-five football schools

Several Baylor players celebrate over Kansas quarterback Carter Stanley (9) after sacking him during the fourth quarter on Saturday, Sept. 4, 2017 at Memorial Stadium.

Several Baylor players celebrate over Kansas quarterback Carter Stanley (9) after sacking him during the fourth quarter on Saturday, Sept. 4, 2017 at Memorial Stadium. by Nick Krug

Now that Kansas routinely is referred to as the worst of the 65 power-five football conference schools (a designation that includes independent Notre Dame), it's time to see if the numbers support the label.

It boiled down to a two-school race with Kansas edging Oregon State, thanks to the Beavers having strong back-to-back weeks in the first two games under interim coach Cory Hall, who lost 36-33 to Colorado in his first game and 15-14 to Stanford in his second. Hall took over after one of the more stunning moves by a coach in recent memory. Gary Andersen quit with a 1-5 record and in doing so walked away from a guaranteed $12.6 million.

After checking the margin between points scored and points allowed for the 65 schools, I ranked the 10 worst in that category and also tracked how many times each school has been on the wrong end of a blowout, which we'll call any loss by 38 or more points.

Illinois checks in at No. 3 and Baylor, which defeated Kansas 38-9 two weeks ago in Lawrence, is No. 4.

Just those four schools had negative margins of more than 100 points. A look at the 10 worst programs, ranked in order of margin between points scored and allowed, with conference record breaking ties:

School
Rec/Conf PF PA Margin Blowouts
(38+L's)
Coach (Record)
1 - Kansas
(1-10, 0-8)
207 463 -256
4
David Beaty (3-32)
2 - Oregon State
(1-10, 0-8)
238 447 -209 0 Cory Hall (0-5) interim
3 - Illinois
(2-9, 0-8)
178 336 -158 1 Lovie Smith (5-18)
4 - Baylor
(1-10, 1-7)
270 386 -116 1
Matt Rhule (1-10)
5 - Vanderbilt
(4-7, 0-7)
253 352 -99 1 Derek Mason (17-31)
6 - Tennessee
(4-7, 0-7)
214 307 -93
2 Brady Hoke (0-1) interim
7 - Maryland
(4-7, 2-5)
286
379
-93
1
D.J. Durkin (10-14)
8 - Rutgers
(4-7, 3-5)
209 300 -91 2 Chris Ash (6-17)
9 - Arkansas
(4-7, 1-6)
300 386 -86 0 Bret Bielema (29-33)
10 - Nebraska
(4-7, 3-5)
295 381 -86 1 Mike Riley (19-18)
Reply 12 comments from Cmdradama Hawkfan9675 Len Shaffer Jhawki78 John Brazelton Robert  Brock Bj Cassady Adam Bengtson Rockchalk1990 Jmfitz85

Dana Anderson the stealth recruiter behind stadium renovation campaign

Dana Anderson sits courtside before the Kansas University men's basketball game Monday at Allen Fieldhouse.

Dana Anderson sits courtside before the Kansas University men's basketball game Monday at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

Most who care about the fortunes of the Kansas football program are familiar with the name Dana Anderson. His generosity enabled construction of the $32 million Anderson Family Football Complex, which houses the football coaches’ offices, player locker rooms and strength and conditioning center.

Anderson also was a big donor for the Wagnon Student Center, which is used not only for athletic training but to house the academic-support wing of the athletic department. It’s where the tutoring takes place. The student-athlete support services staff headed by Paul Buskirk has its offices there.

Anderson also wrote a $1.4 million check to support the new School of Business building. Also, along with the Mike Beatty family of Salina and David Booth was cited as a big donor for the $350 million “Raise the Chant” KU Athletics facilities-upgrade campaign.

That’s all well documented. What I never knew anything about was the key role Anderson played in recruiting the man who would a decade-and-a-half later make the biggest gift in the history of KU Athletics.

Booth, who resides in Austin, grew up in Lawrence and received an MBA from the University of Chicago School of Business, pledged $50 million toward the $350 million campaign that includes a $300 million Memorial Stadium renovation project.

“I started getting involved with KU in about 2003,” Booth told me in the moments leading up to kickoff of the West Virginia game Sept. 23 at Memorial Stadium. “I worked for years in Santa Monica. My office was in Santa Monica, just a couple of blocks from Dana’s. For whatever reason, I had kind of lost touch with KU and Dana came over with somebody from development and got me interested. Then we decided to do the (Booth Family) Hall of Athletics, Lew Perkins’ idea.”

At first glance, Booth was underwhelmed by the unveiling.

“It opens up the first day, I look at it and I go, ‘This is way too small.’ It was about a quarter the size it is now,” Booth said. “So I said, ‘OK, I’ll re-up.’ So the athletic department’s been fantastic in that regard. So that’s why I’m predisposed to do something like this (pledge $50 million). Plus the market's up so that makes it easier to do.”

Six years behind John Hadl at Lawrence High and KU, Booth watched Hadl as a running back and quarterback and watched Todd Reesing scramble and sling his way to a slew of KU passing records. Booth then hired Reesing, a fast riser at Dimensional Fund Advisors, in Austin.

Booth has visited several times with Hadl during the legendary quarterback’s time at the Williams Fund, the fundraising arm of KU Athletics.

So I figured Booth would be as good a source as anyone to ask for a Hadl-Reesing comparison.

Booth spoke to a trait shared by the two strong-armed quarterbacks who were so much harder to get ahold of than their straight-ahead speed suggested they should have been.

“One of the keys to sports and business is you have to be incredibly competitive,” Booth said. “At the same time, while you’re competing, you have to be kind of relaxed. You can’t let everybody know how hard you’re competing. Tom Brady is an incredible competitor and looks very relaxed out there, seems to me.”

In order to amass the fortunes they have through the decades, Booth and Anderson obviously have serious competitive sides, but they also both come across as very relaxed and down to earth.

Anderson’s competitive streak and relaxed exterior no doubt came in handy when he paid a visit to Booth a decade-and-a-half ago. Had Anderson not taken that step, no telling whether the current ambitious campaign ever would have taken flight.

Reply 2 comments from Bryson  Stricker Brett McCabe

Young Kansas defenders blossoming

Oklahoma fullback Dimitri Flowers (36) runs into the end zone with a touchdown in front of Iowa State's Joel Lanning (7) during an NCAA college football game in Norman, Okla., Saturday, Oct. 7, 2017. Iowa State won 38-31.

Oklahoma fullback Dimitri Flowers (36) runs into the end zone with a touchdown in front of Iowa State's Joel Lanning (7) during an NCAA college football game in Norman, Okla., Saturday, Oct. 7, 2017. Iowa State won 38-31. by Sue Ogrocki/AP Photo

Assistant football coaches spend so much time watching video of opponents that they tend to refer to players by numbers instead of names.

Oklahoma’s No. 36 is fullback Dimitri Flowers, a 6-foot-2, 247-pound senior from San Antonio.

A standout blocker and a strong short-yardage back (four rushing touchdowns), Flowers does his sneakiest work as a receiver. He has 20 receptions for four touchdowns and has averaged 17 yards a reception.

“They’re not a sit there, drop-back, throw-the-ball, offense,” Bowen said. “It’s a run offense. They’re really about a 50/50 run-pass. Each personnel grouping is maybe 60-40. (No.) 36 is the hidden weapon in the whole deal.”

Why?

“He’s the guy who’s in there blocking and mixing it up and then catching the pop pass,” Bowen said. “He’s the guy. It’s a lot more of a deception offense than people give them credit for in terms of the play-action pass and stuff they do off the run game. It’s not Baker Mayfield sitting in the pocket throwing a drop-back pass.It’s a lot more of a deceptive offense.”

Deception tore the Kansas defense apart early in the season when young players routinely bit on play-action fakes.

“Early in the year we struggled obviously with everything,” Bowen said. “Eye violations is what we call them. They can’t keep their eye on their target or they keep their eye on their target and they take it off. We’ve been able to steadily improve on that all year. We’re doing things now that we obviously didn’t do earlier in the year.”

Bowen used the Kansas State game as an example of the improvement in eye discipline.

“They’re the king of the fullback pop and they tried it four times against us and didn’t complete one,” Bowen said. “We covered it every time, which had that been the first three games of the year, we would have been 0 for 4 on it. In the Ohio game we were (0 for 4). I’m proud of our guys. They’ve stuck in there and they’ve continued to listen and they’ve continued to work and they have improved.”

Bowen illustrated his point about eye violations by discussing a play the Sooners use to free Flowers.

“You’ll have a defensive end in front of 36 and a safety over the top of him in whatever coverage, quarters, whatever it is, but (a safety is) responsible for 36 if 36 goes vertical. Well, 36 is going to block that defensive end for a count, it’s going to be hard play-action right at him and then 36 is going to slip down the middle of the field.

“A young safety will see the block and run down there like a madman thinking he’s got to fit the run and then he misses him. Whereas a veteran safety will creep down there, knowing he has time to make his fit, and he’ll see him slip and go.”

And the veteran safety will go with him.

“(No.) 36, has caught a lot of balls just on those type of deals alone,” Bowen said.

Offensive coordinator Doug Meacham is more worried about No. 31, edge rusher Ogbonnia Okoronkwo, whom he called the Big 12's best defensive player.

Reply 5 comments from Hawkfanatic Dirk Medema David Robinett West_virginia_hawk Hawkfan9675

A look back at more talented football coaches who wanted Kansas job

The silliest notion that started to gather steam before Kansas chancellor Dr. Doug Girod made it clear David Beaty will be back for a fourth season was the one expressed by many who claimed no good coach would want the job.

False. Every time the job opens, good coaches pursue it. Consider a few not mentioned in Tuesday's Lunch Break.

Gus Malzahn, then offensive coordinator at Auburn, aggressively went after the opening that ultimately went to Charlie Weis.

His wife Kristi Malzahn’s embarrassing interview in which she, among other things, said that Auburn head coach Gene Chizek did not want to recruit Heisman Trophy winner Cam Newton, and if not for her husband he never would have come to Auburn, stopped Kansas athletic director Sheahon Zenger from pursuing Malzahn.

Asked about Newton, Kristi said, “He’s cute. Mmmm.”

Later in the interview, she whispered into the microphone and said of Newton: “I love him, but don’t tell Gus.”

Zenger scratched Malzahn off his list. That didn’t stop Arkansas State and then Auburn from hiring him as head coach. He only stayed at Arkansas State one year and maybe he would have bolted KU as quickly, it still would have been better than hopping on the Weis train.

Glen Mason could have been had and would have had the tools to turn around the program, doing it with a run-first philosophy that would have stood out as unusual in the Big 12 and his Big 10 region recruiting ties could have come in handy.

Might Mike Leach have chosen to work for his friend Zenger instead of Washington State? We’ll never know. Zenger had to wait for an opening in Bernadette Gray-Little’s schedule to arrange a meeting with Leach. Washington State AD Bill Moos had the authority to interview Leach without including the chancellor and made it clear Leach would be working for the AD, not the AD's boss.

The great Terry Donahue, former UCLA coach who has always had a strong feelings for KU since his days as a young assistant coach, could have been talked out of retirement had Lew Perkins thought of him.

Oh well, at least once Girod decided Beaty would return he had the good sense to announce it this week instead of waiting until after the season, which would have been bad for recruiting.

Reply 17 comments from Forever2008 Jeff Coffman Jmfitz85 John Brazelton Keithii Brett McCabe Cary Ediger Davidbeatyrcjh Halogenlampss Phil Leister and 2 others

Impressive football coaches have wanted Kansas job for past three openings

Richard Gwin/Journal World.Northern Illinois coach Dave Doeren keeps a eye on the plays as KU tied up the game late in the 2nd quarter.

Richard Gwin/Journal World.Northern Illinois coach Dave Doeren keeps a eye on the plays as KU tied up the game late in the 2nd quarter.

So how did it come to this? How did a Kansas football program that won the Orange Bowl with a 12-1 record just 10 seasons ago, tumble so far?

One wrong-headed coaching firing and one poor hire by former athletic director Lew Perkins and two poor hires by current AD Sheahon Zenger caused the avalanche.

Well, no kidding, Captain Obvious.

Perkins met with Jim Harbaugh, who has said that the AD would not let him coach Stanford in its bowl game. Perkins has denied that to friends. So Perkins, who could have had former Tennessee coach Phillip Fulmer, hired Turner Gill and Zenger fired him with a 5-19 record.

A number of qualified coaches expressed interest at that point. Dave Doeren, who recruited Aqib Talib, James McClinton and many other standouts working for Mark Mangino, desperately wanted his dream job. He not only had Wisconsin defensive coordinator on his resume, but he was winning big at Northern Illinois. Zenger made the mistake of not hiring him and Doeren’s now 7-3 at North Carolina State, heading for his fourth consecutive bowl game, after inheriting a poor roster that went 3-9 his first season. I always felt as if Doeren’s aggressiveness in pursuing the job was held against him when it should have counted in his favor.

Instead of Doeren, Zenger hired Charlie Weis and fired him with a 6-22 record. Doeren took great satisfaction in beating Weis' Jayhawks in 2012.

Zenger had worked with Justin Fuente at Illinois State and might have hired him to replace Weis. We’ll never know. What we do know is that the then-chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little took that option away from him because she decided Kansas would not be paying any buyouts for football coaches. Fuente’s buyout was $500,000. He’s now doing very well at Virginia Tech, where his buyout is $15 million.

Former Mark Mangino assistant Ed Warinner wanted the Kansas job and Zenger appeared super high on him after having dinner with him in Columbus, Ohio, during a Kansas basketball trip. Warinner then was co-offensive coordinator under Urban Meyer and now is offensive line coach at Minnesota.

Somewhere along the way, Beaty passed Warinner on Zenger's list of prospects. A strict disciplinarian with a head coach's personality who produced phenomenal rushing numbers as OC at Army and record-breaking passing numbers as OC at Kansas, doesn't interview well, but knows how to communicate with football players to make them produce efficiently and cleanly. He will win as a head coach if ever given the chance.

Zenger’s final decision came down to Troy Calhoun of Air Force and Beaty. In the end, Beaty’s potential to recruit the state of Texas was the deciding factor in Zenger selecting him.

Reply 25 comments from Kujayhawk79 Jim Stauffer Cgartner Runningbeakers84 Jmfitz85 Layne Pierce John Brazelton Dave Coen Gunnarhays Spk15 and 9 others

Six turnovers key to last season’s upset vs. Texas

Kansas defensive end Dorance Armstrong Jr. (2) puts Texas running back D'Onta Foreman (33) on the ground after recovering a fumble during the second quarter on Saturday, Nov. 19, 2016 at Memorial Stadium.

Kansas defensive end Dorance Armstrong Jr. (2) puts Texas running back D'Onta Foreman (33) on the ground after recovering a fumble during the second quarter on Saturday, Nov. 19, 2016 at Memorial Stadium. by Nick Krug

Raise your hand if you think Kansas will emerge victorious from its 5 p.m. kickoff Saturday in Austin against heavily favored Texas.

Anybody not wearing a Kansas uniform or coaching for the visitors?

OK, now raise your hand if after the first play from scrimmage in last season’s game vs. Texas in Lawrence you thought the Jayhawks would emerge victorious. A refresher: On the game’s first play from scrimmage, Jacorey Warrick scored on a 75-yard pass play, covering the final 71 yards after the catch on the short pass from Shane Buechele.

Kansas went on to win 24-21 in overtime for David Beaty’s first and to date only victory against an FBS school.

Can Kansas do it again? If it can cause six Texas turnovers again it can. It was the highest turnover total by a team in a Big 12 conference game since the Longhorns turned it over six times vs. TCU in 2014. No Big 12 school has that many miscues in a game this season. Texas has turned it over seven times in nine games.

In the stunning upset, KU had as many interceptions (three) as it has in nine games this season. Brandon Stewart returned his 55 yards for a touchdown and Fish Smithson and Mike Lee also picked off passes, Lee’s leading to the winning field goal.

D’Onta Foreman, now with the Houston Texans, rushed 250 yards and two touchdowns on 51 carries, but also lost two fumbles. Tyrone Swoopes also lost a fumble.

Dorance Armstrong was in on 11 tackles, three for a loss, two sacks, forced a fumble and recovered one, then famously stiff-arming the 235-pound Foreman to the ground. Armstrong called it, "the best game of my college career so far."

Reply 5 comments from Jeff Coffman John Brazelton Jhawki78 Brett McCabe Jmfitz85

Lone-star road losing streak stands at 17 for Kansas

Kansas cornerback Kyle Mayberry (16) watches as TCU wide receiver Taj Williams (2) and TCU wide receiver Ty Slanina (13) celebrate Williams' touchdown catch during the third quarter, Saturday, Oct. 21, 2017 at Amon G. Carter Stadium in Fort Worth.

Kansas cornerback Kyle Mayberry (16) watches as TCU wide receiver Taj Williams (2) and TCU wide receiver Ty Slanina (13) celebrate Williams' touchdown catch during the third quarter, Saturday, Oct. 21, 2017 at Amon G. Carter Stadium in Fort Worth. by Nick Krug

Listening to former Oakland Raiders quarterback and Oakland and Los Angeles Raiders coach Tom Flores in a recent radio interview, it struck me as interesting that he mentioned that he anticipated the Raiders playing well in Miami because a lot of Raiders came from that region of the country and would have a lot of friends and family members in attendance.

It never occurred to me that would be a factor in an NFL game, but it is mentioned often by college players.

Dorance Armstrong and Daniel Wise both brought that up during their interviews this week in preparation for KU’s trip to Austin to play Texas, which the Jayhawks defeated in overtime, the school’s first victory against Texas since 1938.

Plus, being overlooked by Texas and other Texas universities plays a role in their motivation. Armstrong was a unanimous first-team All-Big 12 player in 2016 and Wise surely will earn first-team honors this season, so all of the Texas schools, if they had it to do over again, would have offered scholarships to both players. But so far, they haven’t been able to win a game in their home state.

A second consecutive upset victory against the Longhorns would keep Kansas from breaking the streak for consecutive road losses at football’s highest division. At the moment, KU is tied with Western State (Colorado), which lost 44 in a row from 1926 to 1936.

During that streak 17 of the losses have come in Texas. A look at the Lone Star-state losing streak:

Opponent
Attendance Date Score
Margin Kansas coach
Texas Tech
47,291 Oct. 31, 2009
42-21 21 Mark Mangino
Texas 101,357 Nov. 21, 2009
51-20 31 Mark Mangino
Baylor 35,405 Oct. 2, 2010
55-7 48 Turner Gill
Texas 99,211
Oct. 29, 2011
43-0 43 Turner Gill
Texas A&M
86,411
Nov. 19, 2011
61-7 54
Turner Gill
Baylor 39,039 Nov. 3, 2012
41-14 27 Charlie Weis
Texas Tech
55,052
Nov. 10, 2012
41-34, 2OT
Charlie Weis
Rice 22,974 Sept. 14, 2013
23-14 9 Charlie Weis
TCU 41,894 Oct. 12, 2013
27-17 10 Charlie Weis
Texas 97,105 Nov. 2, 2013
35-13 22 Charlie Weis
Texas Tech
54,071 Oct. 18, 2014
34-21 13 Clint Bowen
Baylor 45,754 Nov. 1, 2014
60-14 46 Clint Bowen
Texas 92,529 Nov. 7, 2015
59-20 39 David Beaty
TCU 44,375 Nov. 14, 2015
23-17 6 David Beaty
Texas Tech
56,494 Sept. 29, 2016
55-19 36 David Beaty
Baylor 47,598 Oct. 15, 2016
49-7 42 David Beaty
TCU 42,969 Oct. 21, 2017
43-0 43 David Beaty
Reply 5 comments from West_virginia_hawk Tom Keegan Chris Condren Leikness

Class-by-class scholarship breakdown for Kansas football

Kansas linebacker Kyron Johnson sweeps aside an obstacle during spring football practice on Tuesday, March 28, 2017.

Kansas linebacker Kyron Johnson sweeps aside an obstacle during spring football practice on Tuesday, March 28, 2017. by Nick Krug

Counting scholarships in college football is somewhat of a moving target. Asked a few weeks ago how many scholarship players Kansas has on the roster, coach David Beaty said 84, but that total counted walk-ons given scholarship because KU wasn't at its limit of 85.

Tallying how many players originally came to the program on scholarship is a better measure of a team's scholarship numbers. Beaty declined to reveal how many such players Kansas has. The best guess, not counting dismissed players LaQuvionte Gonzalez and Maciah Long, is 67, a figure that includes unofficially suspended right tackle Charles Baldwin and nickel back Derrick Neal. It also includes running back Octavius Matthews, whose heart-test results ended his football career and potentially saved his life, and Denzell Evans, who suffered a career-ending injury during training camp.

Part of the scholarship shortage can be attributed to recruiting too many transfers from four-year schools and junior colleges, instead of sticking to his original plan of bringing in huge high school classes every year. Transfers, such as quarterbacks Montell Cozart and Ryan Willis, guard Aaron Garza and tight end Jace Sternberger, also have thinned the ranks.

An educated guess at the players who originally came to Kansas on scholarship,:

Freshmen (17): Shola Ayinde, Earl Bostick, Jay Dineen, Joseph Gilbertson, Quan Hampton, Chris Hughes, Kyron Johnson, Liam Jones, Travis Jordan, Ian Peterson, Dru Prox, Tyriek Starks, Kenyon Tabor, Kyle Thompson, Robert Topps III, Dom Williams, Takulve Williams.

Sophomores (18): Hakeem Adeniji, Isaiah Bean, Julian Chandler, Daylon Charlot, Malik Clark, Hasan Defense, Cam Durley, Evan Fairs, Antione Frazier, Chase Harrell, Khalil Herbert, Mike Lee, Kyle Mayberry, Clyde McCauley III, Shaq Richmond, Carter Stanley, Bryce Torneden, Andru Tovi.

Juniors (24): Dorance Armstrong, Charles Baldwin, Peyton Bender, Jeremiah Booker, Jacob Bragg, Antonio Cole, Joe Dineen, Josh Ehambe, Denzel Feaster, Isi Holani, J.J. Holmes, Larry Hughes, Kerr Johnson, Taylor Martin, Octavius Matthews, Willie McCaleb, Tyrone Miller, Emmanuel Moore, Osaze Ogbebor, Tyler Patrick, Keyshaun Simmons, Steven Sims, Shakial Taylor, Daniel Wise.

Seniors (8): Kellen Ash, Jacky Dezir, Denzell Evans, DeeIsaac Davis, Zach Hannon, Bobby Hartzog, Ben Johnson, Jayson Rhodes.

Reply 30 comments from Brad Sherp Bryson  Stricker Lucas Town Drew425 Jeff Coffman Dirk Medema Jmfitz85 John Brazelton Tom Keegan Chrisdeweese and 3 others

Assistant football coach offices equipped with revolving doors at Kansas

Kansas wide receiver coach Eric Kiesau participates in drills during a KU football practice Saturday, April 5, 2014, at Memorial Stadium.

Kansas wide receiver coach Eric Kiesau participates in drills during a KU football practice Saturday, April 5, 2014, at Memorial Stadium. by Mike Yoder

During our KU Sports Hour football podcast Monday, Matt Tait asked me to throw out a guess off the top of my head as to the number of assistant football coaches Kansas has had in the eight seasons since Mark Mangino was forced to resign.

I guessed 35. Pretty close. The correct answer is 38, including three men who were assistants under Mangino. David Beaty was Turner Gill's wide receivers coach in 2011. Clint Bowen was hired as special teams coach by Charlie Weis in 2012 and took over as defensive coordinator in Weis' following seasons and has remained in the position under Beaty. In 2014, John Reagan was Charlie Weis' offensive line coach and his offensive coordinator, the latter a responsibility Reagan lost a couple of weeks into Bowen's time as interim head coach after Weis was fired four games into the season.

KU has had a great deal of staff turnover in recent seasons at certain positions. For example, six different men have served as the program's offensive coordinator in the past five seasons. KU has had five wide receiver coaches in five seasons and four defensive line coaches in the past four seasons.

Kansas went 50-48 in eight seasons under Mangino and with three games left in the eighth post-Mangino season has a 15-78 record.

If Kansas makes a change at head coach, it will be interesting to see if the next head coach is someone who has had the majority of his staff together for a number of years, which would save the step of a coaching staff meshing and assistants growing familiar with the head coach's way of conducting business.

Position
2010 (Turner Gill)
2011 (Turner Gill)
2012 (Charlie Weis)
2013 (Charlie Weis)
2014 (Charlie Weis)
Clint Bowen
interim

2015 (David Beaty)
2016 (David Beaty)
2017 (David Beaty)
Offensive coordinator
Chuck Long
Chuck Long
Charlie Weis
Charlie Weis
John Reagan
then Eric Kiesau
Rob Likens
David Beaty
Doug Meacham
Defensive coordinator
Carl Torbush
Vic Shealy
Dave Campo
Clint Bowen
Clint Bowen
Clint Bowen
Clint Bowen
Clint Bowen
Special teams
Aaron Stamn
Aaron Stamn
Clint Bowen
None None Gary Hyman
Joe DeForest
Joe DeForest
Offensive line
J.B. Grimes
J.B. Grimes
Tim Grunhard
Tim Grunhard
John Reagan
Zach Yenser
Zach Yenser
Zach Yenser
Defensive line
Buddy Wyatt
Buddy Wyatt
Buddy Wyatt
Buddy Wyatt
Buddy Wyatt
Calvin Thibodeaux
Michael Slater
Jesse Williams
Running backs
Reggie Mitchell
Reggie Mitchell
Reggie Mitchell
Reggie Mitchell
Reggie Mitchell
Reggie Mitchell
Tony Hull
Tony Hull
Linebackers
Carl Torbush
Vantz Singletary
DeMontie Cross
Clint Bowen
Clint Bowen
Kevin Kane
Todd Bradford
Todd Bradford
Wide receivers
Darrell Wyatt
David Beaty
Rob Ianello
Rob Ianello
Eric Kiesau
Klint Kubiak
Jason Phillips
Dough Meacham
Defensive backs
Vic Shealy
Robert Wimberly
Clint Bowen
Dave Campo
Dave Campo
Kenny Perry
Kenny Perry
Kenny Perry
Tight ends
Jeff Blasko
Jeff Blasko
Jeff Blasko
Quarterbacks Ron Powlus
Ron Powlus
Garrett Riley
Asst. D-Backs
Scott Vestal
Reply 25 comments from David Lara Tom Keegan Hawkfan9675 Chriss Ronfranklin John Brazelton Brett McCabe Rchcku71 Bryson  Stricker Robert Brown and 7 others

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