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Posts tagged with South Korea

Odds and Ends in Gwangju - Part #1

Sports reporter Bobby Nightengale and I don't have a lot of free time to experience Gwangju and Korea beyond our daily Team USA basketball coverage. It's unfortunate, because as we ride our shuttle buses between sites, I'm spotting so many photo opportunities and places I'd love to check out. Beautiful, small gardens are squeezed into the tiniest city plots, trees are well tended and trimmed, everything seems very clean and this place is the epitome of high tech. They are well wired but also very energy conscious. When I first opened the door to my hotel room, I couldn't figure out how to turn on the lights. No amount of pushing buttons would help. I finally figured out that slipping the room card into a wall slot turned on the room power. This means that when you leave your room, no matter what lights or devices you have on, as soon as you pull your key card, everything shuts down. It's a great system, but it makes it hard to charge camera batteries when I'm not in the room.

Our first day at the Convention Center, where the Main Press workroom is located, we noticed the escalators were not working, so we took an elevator. Later we watched someone approach the non-moving escalator and as they stepped onto it the stairs starting moving. Brilliant. Except you do need to pay attention that you are approaching the correct up or down escalator. I was about thrown backwards trying to go up a down flight. Guess I couldn't translate the arrow logo with a slash through.

Even our buses have the latest tech gear. On our ride to Muan today, a 40-minute ride to the basketball arena, the wide-screen TV was showing a local Korean TV show. There were only 3 of us on the bus, but a Korean gentleman and I were enjoying the show. Unfortunately, he was also the driver so I decided I better put on my seatbelt.

Speaking of buses, we had a difficult time locating our media shuttle bus after the opening ceremonies. Thousands of people streamed out of the stadium and headed for buses. Since we couldn't spot the media bus we were pointed to a bus that would take us to the city bus terminal and from there we could catch a taxi to our hotel. We got in line and as I squeezed into the bus stairwell a Korean woman snuck between Bobby and I. We were already overpacked. I had just witnessed and photographed another packed bus where police yelled at the driver and for passengers to get off because it was overcrowded. I was worried that would now happen to me. Our bus driver tapped my shoulder and pointed out the door. I pointed to Bobby, who was ahead of me and said. "I'm with him," hoping that what I said sounded like "No way I'm getting off this bus," in Korean. I managed to keep my camera bags around my shoulder and push forward. The driver closed the door and we were off.

I may have mentioned this already, but it's worth repeating. Everyone here is so kind and helpful and they speak English, as much as is possible, to communicate with us. I can't reciprocate speaking Korean so I bow often, smile a lot and thank everyone profusely. We were informed that you bow to approximately 35 to 45-degree in Korea and a 90-degree bow in Japan. It's now become a routine and I'm afraid I over do it. But I've also noticed a similar action by Koreans offering a gesture of respect toward us. It's the two-fingered peace sign and a big smile.

It only gets slightly annoying when I'm trying to take a natural, unposed photograph. I really hope my bowing technique isn't just as annoying.

Bobby and I got an hour of free time recently and we went in the golf driving range just down the street. It's basically a city block of green artificial turf with giant nets maybe 100 feet or more high on all sides. You can see these driving ranges from miles away in several locations throughout this city of 3 million. The clubhouse has two levels to tee from with maybe 50 tees on each level. You pay approximately $8 for 40 minutes - all the balls you can hit. After hitting, a new ball is delivered from below ground. Neither of us really golf, but it seemed like a quick way to experience this unique cityscape and apparently very popular Korean activity. All 100 tee spots seemed full.

That's all I've got for now. Here's a photo of Wayne Selden Jr. from today's 106-41 Team USA win over Chile.

Reply 3 comments from Kingfisher Jayhawkmarshall Dale Rogers

Comparing rules of NCAA and FIBA

Kansas forward Jamari Traylor (31) delivers a tomahawk dunk over members of Team Canada during the third quarter of Friday's World University Games exhibition at Sprint Center.

Kansas forward Jamari Traylor (31) delivers a tomahawk dunk over members of Team Canada during the third quarter of Friday's World University Games exhibition at Sprint Center. by Nick Krug

If you caught either of Kansas basketball’s Team USA exhibitions against Canada at Sprint Center, you’re already a little familiar with some of the differences between the rules of college basketball and international play.

Now that the World University Games are here — KU opens pool play versus Turkey at 10 p.m. Friday night on ESPNU — a rundown of all the differences and similarities seems in order.

DURATION OF GAME

NCAA: Two 20-minute halves | FIBA: Four 10-minute quarters

SHOT CLOCK

NCAA: 35 seconds | FIBA: 24 seconds

SHOT CLOCK RESET

NCAA: FG attempt hits rim | FIBA: Resets to 14 seconds when FGA hits rim and offensive rebound is secured

OVERTIME DURATION

NCAA: 5 minutes | FIBA: 5 minutes

LENGTH OF HALFTIME

NCAA: 15 minutes | FIBA: 15 minutes

COURT LENGTH

NCAA: 94 feet x 50 feet | FIBA: 91-10 x 49-2.5

SIZE OF LANE

NCAA: 12 feet x 19 feet | FIBA: 16 x 19

Kansas guard Frank Mason III (0) signals the bench and crowd after hitting a three-point basket near the end of a 91-83 Team USA exhibition game win against Canada Tuesday, June 23, at the Sprint Center in K.C., MO.

Kansas guard Frank Mason III (0) signals the bench and crowd after hitting a three-point basket near the end of a 91-83 Team USA exhibition game win against Canada Tuesday, June 23, at the Sprint Center in K.C., MO. by Mike Yoder

3-POINT DISTANCE

NCAA: 20 feet-9 inches | FIBA: 22-1.75

NO-CHARGE SEMICIRCLE

NCAA: 0.914 meters from center of basket | FIBA: 1.25 meters from center

ADVANCE BALL TO HALFCOURT AT TIMEOUT

NCAA: Not allowed | FIBA: Allowed in final 2 minutes of fourth quarter and OT

BACKCOURT VIOLATION

NCAA: 10 seconds | FIBA: 8 seconds

GAME CLOCK STOPS AFTER FG

NCAA: Last minute of second half and last minute of OT | FIBA: Last 2 minutes of fourth quarter and OT

Kansas guard Wayne Selden Jr. (1) gets a foul called on him going for a steal against Canada forward Tommy Nixon (14) in the first-half of a Team USA exhibition game against Canada Tuesday, June 23, at the Sprint Center in K.C., MO.

Kansas guard Wayne Selden Jr. (1) gets a foul called on him going for a steal against Canada forward Tommy Nixon (14) in the first-half of a Team USA exhibition game against Canada Tuesday, June 23, at the Sprint Center in K.C., MO. by Mike Yoder

PLAYER FOUL LIMIT

NCAA: Five | FIBA: Five (or two technical fouls)

BONUS FREE THROWS

NCAA: On seventh foul of half (1-and-1); 10th foul (2 FTAs) | FIBA: On fifth foul of quarter (2 FTAs); fourth quarter carries into OT

NUMBER OF PLAYERS PERMITTED ON FREE THROW LANE

NCAA: Six (four defensive, two offensive) | FIBA: Five (three offensive, two defensive)

JUMP BALL

NCAA: Alternating possession after tip-off | FIBA: Alternating possession after tip-off

PLAYERS CAN TOUCH BALL ABOVE CYLINDER

NCAA: Nope | FIBA: You betcha

FLOPPING RULE

NCAA: Doesn’t have one | FIBA: Warning on the first flop; technical on the next flop

TIMEOUTS

NCAA: Four 75-second timeouts, two 30-seconds | FIBA: 2 60-second timeouts in first and second quarters, three 60-second timeouts in third and fourth quarters; maximum of two timeouts in final 2 minutes of a game

TV TIMEOUTS

NCAA: Four per half | FIBA: Up to one per quarter

OVERTIME TIMEOUTS

NCAA: One additional 75-second timeout and any unused from regulation | FIBA: One additional 60-second timeout

WHO CALLS TIMEOUTS

NCAA: Head coach or player on floor | FIBA: Head coach or assistant coach

Kansas guard LaGerald Vick (2) and forward Hunter Mickelson (42) fight for a rebound in the paint with members of Team Canada during the third quarter of Friday's World University Games exhibition at Sprint Center.

Kansas guard LaGerald Vick (2) and forward Hunter Mickelson (42) fight for a rebound in the paint with members of Team Canada during the third quarter of Friday's World University Games exhibition at Sprint Center. by Nick Krug

SIZE OF BASKETBALL

NCAA: Max circumference of 30 inches / minimum circumference 29.5; max weight 20 ounces / minimum weight 17.99 oz. | FIBA: Max circumference 29 inches; max weight 20 ounces / minimum weight 17.99 oz.

LEGAL JERSEY NUMBERS

NCAA: 00, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, numbers ending in 1-5 up to No. 55 | FIBA: All numbers, 00 (or 0) through 99

Reply 1 comment from Texashawk10_2

Jayhawks savor Team USA appearance at opening ceremonies

When Turkey arrives for its game in a few hours, the opponents' uniforms will say Kansas.

On Friday night in Gwangju Universiade Stadium, the Jayhawks were simply Team USA.

USA Team athletes, including the Kansas Jayhawks', representing Team USA basketball, enter Gwangju Universiade Main Stadium during the opening ceremony of the 28th World University Games July 3 in Gwangju, South Korea.

USA Team athletes, including the Kansas Jayhawks', representing Team USA basketball, enter Gwangju Universiade Main Stadium during the opening ceremony of the 28th World University Games July 3 in Gwangju, South Korea. by Mike Yoder

The spotlight hits members of the Team USA basketball team enter Gwangju Universiade Main Stadium during the opening ceremony of the 28th World University Games July 3 in Gwangju, South Korea.

The spotlight hits members of the Team USA basketball team enter Gwangju Universiade Main Stadium during the opening ceremony of the 28th World University Games July 3 in Gwangju, South Korea. by Mike Yoder

The KU basketball team joined more than 10,000 other athletes and nearly 50,000 spectators for the opening ceremonies of the World University Games.

The Jayhawks couldn't stick around for the entire show — their first game begins at noon Saturday (10 p.m. Friday CDT) — but they raved about the experience on social media.

None by Devonte' Graham

None by Jamari Traylor

None by Landen A. Lucas

None by 1

None by Evan Manning

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💲Priceless💲

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KU forward Landen Lucas gave play-by-play as the team walked to and through the ceremony.

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#KUinKorea #USA

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The walk in

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#KUinKorea

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#KUinKorea

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Check out more photos from the ceremonies from Journal-World photographer Mike Yoder.

And check back to KUsports.com for full coverage of USA v. Turkey, tonight at 10 p.m. CDT. The game will be televised on ESPNU.

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Behind the scenes with the Jayhawks in South Korea

After 28 hours of travel, between practices and before games, the Kansas basketball team is making time for some well-deserved R&R in South Korea.

And thanks to social media, we can follow along:

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#KUinKorea

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The "KU in Korea" Instagram account is full of great behind-the-scenes moments: food, dancing, sightseeing, more dancing ... check it out:

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#KUinKorea @fmason0

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Pt. 2 #KUinKorea

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Check out the official KUHoops Instagram account, player Twitter accounts and Snapchat accounts for more.


Be sure to check back to KUsports.com for exclusive content from reporter Bobby Nightengale and photographer Mike Yoder.

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ESPNU to televise KU basketball at World University Games

Night owls and early risers, rejoice.

Fans in the United States will be able to watch the Kansas men's basketball team on ESPNU during this week's World University Games in Gwangju, South Korea.

The 14-hour time difference from Korea to Kansas means that the Jayhawks' first pool play game will air Friday at 10 p.m. CDT.

Other games may begin as late as 1 a.m. or as early as 4 a.m., but all will be on an ESPN network and available through the WatchESPN app, ESPN announced Monday.

KUsports.com's Bobby Nightengale and Mike Yoder are with the team in Korea and will also bring you live coverage from the court during the games.

None by Mike Yoder


Full schedule (all times CDT):

Friday, July 3 — 10 p.m. — Team USA vs. Turkey

Sunday, July 5 — 6:30 a.m. — Brazil vs. Team USA

Tuesday, July 7 — 10 p.m. — Team USA vs. Serbia

Wednesday, July 8 — 8 p.m. — Team USA vs. Switzerland

Saturday, July 11 — 12:30 a.m. — Quarterfinal

Sunday, July 12 — 1 a.m. — Semifinal (Option 1)

Sunday, July 12 — 4 a.m. — Semifinal (Option 2)

Monday, July 13 — 6:30 a.m. — Gold Medal Game

Reply 2 comments from Nick Gerik Plasticjhawk