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Posts tagged with Josh Jackson

2018-19 season preview: An MVP an MIP and a BWA?

In this Oct. 8, 2018, file photo, Philadelphia 76ers' J.J. Redick (17), Dallas Mavericks' Ryan Broekhoff (45), of Australia, 76ers' Joel Embiid (21), of Cameroon, Mavericks' Salah Mejri (50), of Tunisia, 76ers' Mike Muscala (31) and Mavericks' Maxi Kleber, of Germany, play in an exhibition NBA basketball game in Shenzhen, China. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung, File)

In this Oct. 8, 2018, file photo, Philadelphia 76ers' J.J. Redick (17), Dallas Mavericks' Ryan Broekhoff (45), of Australia, 76ers' Joel Embiid (21), of Cameroon, Mavericks' Salah Mejri (50), of Tunisia, 76ers' Mike Muscala (31) and Mavericks' Maxi Kleber, of Germany, play in an exhibition NBA basketball game in Shenzhen, China. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung, File)

When last we left our masked hero, he was, well, masked. And tired of wearing a mask. And angry about his season coming to an end in the second round of the NBA playoffs.

Compared to how his first three years in the league played out, though, none of those details seem so bad in retrospect.

Over the course of the 2017-18 season, Joel Embiid went from an injury-prone punchline to one of the game’s most dominating players. Some less serious setbacks than the ones that marred the Philadelphia center’s previous three as a professional caused him to miss 19 games, most coming at the end of the regular season. But his impact and numbers — 22.9 points per game, 11.0 rebounds, 3.2 assists, 1.8 blocks — were so great that he made the All-NBA second team in his second season of competition.

A man who couldn’t seem to stay healthy enough to actually get on the court after becoming the Sixers’ No. 3 overall draft pick in 2014 helped his team secure the No. 3 seed in the Eastern Conference.

When considering all that Embiid accomplished in his first full season in the NBA (he only played 31 of 82 games before suffering a season-ending injury as a rookie), I keep going back to what the 7-footer said before it all played out. When Embiid and the 76ers practiced at Allen Fieldhouse in October of 2017, I asked the former University of Kansas center whether he had added anything new to his repertoire during the offseason.

“Not really,” Embiid replied. “Because I didn’t really get the chance to be on the court this summer, because I was rehabbing (the left-knee injury that ended his 2016-17 season).”

The man couldn’t even work on his game during the summer, said he felt behind in the preseason and went on to become not just an all-star, but an all-league performer. And Embiid said once he got healthy and caught up he thought the Sixers — after five consecutive losing, playoff-less seasons — could make the postseason.

So we should probably heed the Cameroonian center’s words regarding his expectations for the 2018-19 season, which tips off Tuesday night (7 p.m., TNT) with Philadelphia taking on East favorite Boston, the team that eliminated the Sixers in the second round this past spring.

Amid a healthy offseason of actually working on his game and conditioning, Embiid made it clear back in August that he’s planning on a massive campaign.

“I want to win the MVP,” he told Yahoo Sports. “I feel like at the end of the day it might be an individual award, but when I play better, the team also does. I feel like if I’m an MVP candidate or if I win the MVP, that means we are on another level.”

Embiid possesses the bravado of a professional wrestler and the size and skill to become (if healthy, a parenthetical that will continue to accompany him for some time) one of the game’s all-time great big men. You’ll want to tune in for the show every chance you get.

Other Jayhawks to watch

Josh Jackson

Phoenix Suns forward Josh Jackson (20) in the first half during an NBA preseason basketball game against the Portland Trail Blazers, Friday, Oct. 5, 2018, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Rick Scuteri)

Phoenix Suns forward Josh Jackson (20) in the first half during an NBA preseason basketball game against the Portland Trail Blazers, Friday, Oct. 5, 2018, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Rick Scuteri)

On the opposite end of the NBA spectrum, in Phoenix, where the likely lottery-bound Suns have an intriguing core of young talent but play in the loaded Western Conference, another former one-and-done lottery pick from KU, Josh Jackson, enters his second season with some hardware in mind, too.

And Jackson isn’t taking an outlandish route with his goal.

After averaging 13.1points and 4.6 rebounds and shooting 41.7 percent from the floor in 77 games as a rookie, Jackson, through a promotional piece for Under Armour, made public his plan to go after the NBA’s Most Improved Player award.

“I really want to win that award,” the 21-year-old Jackson said. “It would help me feel the work I put in last season and this summer paid off.”

While Suns games aren’t exactly easy to find on the league’s national TV schedule, you can keep up with Jackson’s progress over at The Undefeated, where he will work with Marc J. Spears throughout the season to provide diary entries about his life on and off the court.

“How good is he? How good is he going to be? Can he really win? I feel like this is a big year for me to answer those questions,” Jackson began in his first piece.

Marcus Morris

Boston Celtics' Marcus Morris (13) drives against Cleveland Cavaliers' Cedi Osman (16) in the first half of an NBA preseason basketball game, Saturday, Oct. 6, 2018, in Cleveland. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)

Boston Celtics' Marcus Morris (13) drives against Cleveland Cavaliers' Cedi Osman (16) in the first half of an NBA preseason basketball game, Saturday, Oct. 6, 2018, in Cleveland. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)

Though he started four games for Boston in the 2018 Eastern Conference Finals, Marcus Morris plans on making a different role work for him this season.

The Celtics’ top five players — Kyrie Irving, Gordon Hayward, Al Horford, Jayson Tatum and Jaylen Brown — project as one of the league’s best lineups. Morris, entering his eighth season, plans on Boston having one of the NBA’s top bench units, too.

With the old school hiphop group N.W.A. the source of his inspiration, Morris declared the Celtics’ group of reserves — himself, Marcus Smart, Terry Rozier, Aron Baynes and others — “B.W.A.” or “bench with attitude.”

“I think we have a lot of guys that bring that fire,” Morris told The Athletic. “So I just wanted to try and have fun with it. We’ve got, to me, a couple guys on the bench who could start on other teams. And at the same time we’re still coming in with that fire. Basically, if another bench don’t come in ready we’re going to bust their ass. And that’s how we approach it.”

Morris and the Celtics are gunning for the franchise’s first NBA Finals appearance since 2010.

Markieff Morris

Because, of course he did, Marcus’ twin brother Markieff, he of the Washington Wizards, told reporters before the preseason schedule even began that Boston “has never been better than us.”

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The Wizards, in Markieff’s mind, are the best team in the East.

“Raptors are going through a little bit, they changed up DeMar DeRozan,” the Wizards forward opined. “Other than that, Boston has never been better than us. Internally we don't think they were better than us last year. But we just got to play up to our ability."

The East’s No. 8 seed this past season, Washington lost to Toronto in the first round of the playoffs. We’ll have to check back in April or May to gauge Markieff’s prophesying abilities.

Andrew Wiggins

Minnesota Timberwolves' Andrew Wiggins, left, drives against Denver Nuggets' Wilson Chandler during the first half of an NBA basketball game Wednesday, April 11, 2018, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)

Minnesota Timberwolves' Andrew Wiggins, left, drives against Denver Nuggets' Wilson Chandler during the first half of an NBA basketball game Wednesday, April 11, 2018, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)

The No. 1 overall pick in the 2014 draft and the recent recipient of a five-year, $148 million contract extension, Andrew Wiggins is viewed in most NBA circles as little more than an athletic scorer.

Those who cover Minnesota for the Star Tribune have reached a point where they’re ready to label Wiggins as a lost cause.

The Timberwolves’ best player, Jimmy Butler, demanded a trade, reportedly, in part, due to his not-so-high opinion of Wiggins and the franchise’s youngest star, Karl-Anthony Towns.

Butler might have been traded by the time you’re reading this. Or he might play out the season begrudgingly with Minnesota. Either way, Wiggins will be on the receiving end of some unwanted attention. The T’wolves are due to pay him more than $25 million this season and they — coach Tom Thibodeau in particular — would like to see more from the 23-year-old wing than the 19.7 points per game career average he brings with him into his fifth NBA season.

Devonte’ Graham and Svi Mykhailiuk

Kansas guards Devonte' Graham, left, and Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk (10) take questions about their seeding following the NCAA tournament selection show on Sunday, March 11, 2018 at Allen Fieldhouse. The Jayhawks will take on Penn in the first round, Thursday, in Wichita.

Kansas guards Devonte' Graham, left, and Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk (10) take questions about their seeding following the NCAA tournament selection show on Sunday, March 11, 2018 at Allen Fieldhouse. The Jayhawks will take on Penn in the first round, Thursday, in Wichita. by Nick Krug

Sure, they play on opposite coasts for very different franchises, but for one last time it seems right to group these two former KU teammates and sidekicks together.

Both second-round picks enter their rookie season in similar situations, too. Devonte’ Graham, for now, looks like a 12th man type for Charlotte, behind all-star Kemba Walker and former Spurs great Tony Parker at point guard.

Playing for the Los Angeles Lakers, on the same team as legendary forward LeBron James no less, Svi Mykhailiuk, like Graham, likely won’t be called upon unless the bench is emptied in the game’s final minutes.

But an injury here or there could bump either of the rookies up their team’s depth chart. It will be interesting to see how they handle their opportunities when they come and to monitor how much their respective franchises utilize the G League in their development.

Kelly Oubre Jr.

Under contract only through the end of this season, Kelly Oubre Jr.’s next few months will determine how much money teams, including Washington, are interested in paying him once he becomes a restricted free agent next summer.

The 15th overall pick in the 2015 draft, Oubre is coming off easily his most productive season in the NBA, having averaged 11.8 points, 4.5 rebounds, 1.2 assists and 1.0 steals, while shooting 34.1 percent from 3-point range — all career highs.

He already has proven to be a valuable defender as a pro. If he can somehow develop into a slightly better 3-point shooter Oubre won’t have to worry about finding a team that wants to pay him.

Frank Mason III

Sacramento Kings guard Frank Mason III (10) drives to the basket around Oklahoma City Thunder guard Raymond Felton (2) during the second half of an NBA basketball game in Sacramento, Calif., Thursday, Feb. 22, 2018. The Thunder won 110-107. (AP Photo/Steve Yeater

Sacramento Kings guard Frank Mason III (10) drives to the basket around Oklahoma City Thunder guard Raymond Felton (2) during the second half of an NBA basketball game in Sacramento, Calif., Thursday, Feb. 22, 2018. The Thunder won 110-107. (AP Photo/Steve Yeater

A beloved former national player of the year at KU, Frank Mason III just might begin his second season taking on a key role for Sacramento.

According to NBC Sports Bay Area, Kings coach Dave Joerger is considering starting Mason in the backcourt while the team is without Bogdan Bogdanovic.

“You’re going to get 110 percent from him,” Joerger said of Mason.

A hot start for Mason could inspire his coach to ask more of him on a permanent basis. Mason averaged 18.9 minutes while playing in 52 games as a rookie, producing 7.9 points, 2.8 assists and 2.5 rebounds, with 36 percent 3-point accuracy but just a 38.4 percent mark on 2-pointers as he struggled to finish inside against the length of NBA defenders.

Wayne Selden

Though Wayne Selden, in his first full season with Memphis, averaged 9.3 points per game and hit 40.2 percent of his 3-pointers, his status within the Grizzlies’ rotation, it appears, will be determined by how he plays in the weeks ahead and fits into various lineups.

As reported by the Memphis Commercial Appeal, injuries during his time with the organization have kept Selden from establishing what he could be for the Grizzlies. Selden will enter the summer of 2019 as an unrestricted free agent.

Cheick Diallo

Coming into his third year with New Orleans, Cheick Diallo has yet to play more than 11.7 minutes a game. He at least appeared in 52 in 2017-18, far more than the 17 he experienced as a rookie.

Due to the Pelicans’ front court depth — Anthony Davis, Julius Randle, Nikola Mirotic, Darius Miller and even Jahlil Okafor — it’s difficult to foresee his role expanding this year.

Ben McLemore

Back with Sacramento after an uneventful stint with Memphis, Ben McLemore, at 25, doesn’t even really fit into the Kings’ youth movement.

It doesn’t seem too farfetched for him to play behind Bogdanovic, Buddy Hield, Yogi Ferrell and Iman Shumpert at shooting guard.

When the Kings traded for him this summer it was most likely for his contract, which will come off the books at the end of this season.

Billy Preston

An undrafted rookie who never actually played at Kansas, Billy Preston likely won’t play much for Cleveland this year, either.

The 6-foot-10 forward whose name infamously popped up in the ongoing federal college basketball trial is playing on a two-way contract with the Cavs, allowing him to split time in the G League and NBA.

Reply 4 comments from Oddgirl2 Surrealku Tony Bandle

Josh Jackson left his rookie year wiser, now he wants to get stronger

Phoenix Suns guard Josh Jackson (20) dunks over New Orleans Pelicans forward Cheick Diallo (13) during the second half of an NBA basketball game Friday, April 6, 2018, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Matt York)

Phoenix Suns guard Josh Jackson (20) dunks over New Orleans Pelicans forward Cheick Diallo (13) during the second half of an NBA basketball game Friday, April 6, 2018, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Matt York)

Nothing humbles a lifelong basketball prodigy quite like finally reaching the NBA only to find out that combination of athleticism and skills that helped you dominate in high school and college isn’t nearly as effective anymore.

In his first year as a professional, after leaving Kansas, Josh Jackson improved greatly over the course of the lengthy regular season, garnering a spot on the NBA’s All-Rookie second team.

Still, Phoenix’s No. 4 overall pick in the 2017 draft said recently his summer plans involve spending “a lot” of hours at the gym, because he wants to get stronger, add some muscle weight and work on improving his ball-handling.

“I think this year I had a lot of turnovers where I was just dribbling and lost the ball,” Jackson shared in a video interview for the Suns’ website. “A lot of times where I just took a look at myself and the other guys on the court, and I’m like, ‘Wow. These guys are a lot stronger than me. This needs to change.’”

While his mistakes, especially those that resulted from being overpowered, might stick out in his mind, high turnover rates are common for high profile rookies, because they typically play for bad teams and are asked to carry much of the offense at a young age (Jackson turned 21 in February).

Jackson turned the ball over 1.9 times a game, which ranked seventh-highest among first-year players. But the six rookies with worse averages — Ben Simmons (3.4), Dennis Smith Jr. (2.8), Donovan Mitchell (2.7), Lonzo Ball (2.6), De’Aaron Fox (2.4) and Milos Teodosic (2.2) — carried greater ball-handling responsibilities for their teams.

A 6-foot-8 forward who got off to a slow start as a pro, averaging 8.8 points in November and 8.7 in December, Jackson finished his rookie campaign starting 35 of 77 games for the Suns. His 13.1 points per game ranked 7th among rookies, and Jackson was among the best first-year players in steals (1.0 per game, 5th), shooting (41.7% FGs, 6th) and rebounding (4.6, 9th).

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Looking back at his first go-round, Jackson understands why strength and conditioning workouts will have to become a staple of his offseason.

“Before that all-star break (mid-February) I think I was probably the most tired I’ve ever been in my life. I was literally gasping for air. But I made it through. I made it through,” Jackson repeated. “I’m happy I’ve got one NBA season under my belt and I see what it’s like now. It’s a long stretch. You’ve gotta take care of your body and you’ve always gotta be prepared and ready to play.”

Perhaps his most memorable initiation to the reality of the NBA came at the end of one of his best individual showings. Jackson capped a 27-point night (13-for-24 shooting) at Houston late in the season by knocking down a 17-foot, go-ahead jumper with less than two seconds left.

Jackson thought he won the game for Phoenix, and that belief “lasted maybe about 15 seconds,” because the Rockets’ Gerald Green made a 3-pointer on the other end.

Off the court, Jackson had to get the hang of the NBA’s rigors, as well.

“I knew about the 82 games. I knew it was gonna be hard. What I didn’t know was about the travel schedule. I didn’t really put that into perspective,” he admitted.

Playing in Phoenix or some other city, getting on a plane afterward and playing in another city the next night took some getting used to, as did so much flying for someone who is afraid of heights.

“Sometimes after a game I just want to go home, lay down and go to sleep, but you can’t,” Jackson said, adding he’s trying to find ways to fall asleep on planes. “I still haven’t figured it out yet.”

Even though the Suns went 21-61 (worst in the NBA) during his rookie year, Jackson is optimistic about the franchise’s future. The team is likely to build around him, Devin Booker and the upcoming No. 1 pick in the draft — possibly Deandre Ayton or Luka Doncic.

“I honestly can’t believe my rookie season has come to an end this quick, but I had a lot of fun this year,” Jackson said. “Obviously we had kind of a tough season, but I enjoyed all the guys this year, the coaching staff, and I’m excited for next year, getting to work with these guys this summer and see what we can bring to the table next year.”

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After slow start to rookie season, Josh Jackson beginning to take off

Phoenix Suns forward Josh Jackson drives as Dallas Mavericks forward Maximilian Kleber (42)) defends, while Suns forward TJ Warren (12) watches during the first half of an NBA basketball game Wednesday, Jan. 31, 2018, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

Phoenix Suns forward Josh Jackson drives as Dallas Mavericks forward Maximilian Kleber (42)) defends, while Suns forward TJ Warren (12) watches during the first half of an NBA basketball game Wednesday, Jan. 31, 2018, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

Over the first few months of what will undoubtedly be a long career for Josh Jackson, little was heard from the NBA rookie in Phoenix.

Playing for one of the worst teams in the league in a non-major market will do that to you, especially when your production doesn’t immediately take off.

In November, the No. 4 overall pick out of Kansas averaged 8.8 points on 40.1% shooting, only made 18.4% of his 3-pointers, and contributed 3.8 rebounds and 1.3 assists. It was more of the same in December: 8.7 points, 35.7% shooting, 24.1% on 3-pointers, and averages of 3.1 boards and 1.1 assists.

Jackson’s rookie season hit rock bottom the first week of January, when Suns coach Jay Triano benched him — as in didn’t play the 6-foot-8 forward a single second — in a game against one of the NBA’s other poor teams, Atlanta.

“It was kind of hard to take in,” Jackson told The Arizona Republic in January. “I kind of really didn’t understand what he was saying.”

According to Scott Bordow, The Arizona Republic, the explanation given to the 21-year-old at the time included presenting Jackson with some harsh statistics. Before he was benched, the Suns had a 97.4 offensive rating with him on the court and played nearly 10 points per 100 possessions better without him, at 106.7. What’s more, Phoenix’s defense with Jackson (111.3 rating) was worse than when he wasn’t on the floor (106.6).

Jackson didn’t take the message or the benching lightly.

“Now we kind of have a schedule where, every week, I’ll come in and we’ll watch film or just talk about things that happened in the previous games and practices just for me to get better,” Jackson told The Arizona Republic of how he responded to Triano.

As detailed by Bordow at AZCentral.com, Jackson has at times looked like a much different player since watching that game against the Hawks from the bench. In his past 19 games, Jackson is averaging 14.2 points, 5.3 rebounds and 1.5 assists, and making 44.2% of his shot attempts, as well as 30.1% of his 3-pointers.

No, Jackson hasn’t become flawless. There was his 0-for-13 shooting night versus Houston in late January and a 4-for-18 outing at Golden State in the week leading up to the all-star break. But he also has scored 20 or more points in four of Phoenix’s six games in February and resembled a young franchise cornerstone instead of a slumping rookie. Thus far this month, he’s shooting 45% from the field — just 26.9% on 3-pointers, though — and averaging 17.4 points, with 6.1 boards and 1.4 assists.

In a loss to Denver Feb. 10, Jackson became the first NBA rookie to put up 20-plus points and four-plus rebounds, assists and blocks in the same game since Anthony Davis.

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He entered the all-star break on a high note, too, putting up 22 points on 10-for-15 shooting against one of the league’s most respected defensive teams, the Utah Jazz.

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As he gets more comfortable facing NBA defenders Jackson is becoming a better finisher. And the Suns need him to be. Of his 247 made field goals as a pro, 133 of them have come from within 5 feet and in, per stats.nba.com.

He has shot 54.5% from that range on the season, but his percentage around the basket is up to 61.3% since Triano took his playing time away.

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Jackson displayed during his one season at Kansas the ability to defend, finish a stop or force a turnover, push and finish at the other end in a matter of seconds. At times, such versatility has translated to the NBA, as well.

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A student of the game, Jackson is learning and adjusting in his rookie season. Teamed with young Suns star Devin Booker, expect to hear much more from the 2017 lottery pick in years to come.

Reply 9 comments from Marius7782 Pius Waldman Jim Stauffer Brad Avery Allan Olson Surrealku Boardshorts Tim Orel Tommy Tripp

Head-to-head: Embiid’s 76ers beat Wiggins’ T’wolves; Mason’s Kings top Jackson’s Suns

Philadelphia 76ers center Joel Embiid (21), of Cameroon, drives against Minnesota Timberwolves center Karl-Anthony Towns (32) during the second quarter of an NBA basketball game on Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017, in Minneapolis. The 76ers won 118-112. (AP Photo/Hannah Foslien)

Philadelphia 76ers center Joel Embiid (21), of Cameroon, drives against Minnesota Timberwolves center Karl-Anthony Towns (32) during the second quarter of an NBA basketball game on Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017, in Minneapolis. The 76ers won 118-112. (AP Photo/Hannah Foslien)

With so many Jayhwaks making a living in the NBA it’s not difficult on any given day to find a box score with a former Kansas basketball standout appearing for each team. But Tuesday night’s schedule provided a pair of reunions for one-time KU teammates who likely always will be tied together.

The brightest star associated with Kansas, Joel Embiid and his Sixers beat Andrew Wiggins’ Timberwolves in overtime, and one hard-nosed rookie picked up a win over another in Sacramento, where Frank Mason III’s Kings prevailed over Josh Jackson’s Suns.

Embiid’s greatness beamed down the stretch in Minneapolis, as he put up 28 points, 12 rebounds and a career-best 8 assists. Per ESPN, the last 76er center to hit those numbers in those categories was another famous Jayhawk, Wilt Chamberlain.

But Embiid’s individual production, he told ESPN’s Scott Van Pelt during a post-game interview, wasn’t what made him most proud about the night.

“We fought back,” Embiid said of a game that featured several lead changes in the fourth quarter, before Philadelphia won in OT, when Embiid scored the first basket of the extra period and later nailed a 3-pointer to extend the lead to seven. “We went down in the fourth and then we (faced) some adversity and we won the game.”

The Sixers, so often maligned the past several years for not competing with the rest of the league, improved to 14-13 on the year and 7-7 on the road.

“We’re getting better. We’ve got a lot of growing to do. We’ve been doing a better job, especially this year,” Embiid told Van Pelt, adding his first three seasons with the organization — two of which he missed with injuries — were tough to swallow. “To be in this type of position where we can actually go into the game and know that we have a chance to win and we’re going to win is always great.”

One wouldn’t have known it from Embiid’s near triple-double in a career-high 39 minutes, but some back soreness forced him to miss Philly’s two previous games — road losses at New Orleans and Cleveland — and he was a game-time decision against Minnesota.

“I missed the last two games and I don’t want to be that guy who’s always missing games,” said Embiid, who has played in 22 of 27 this year. “So I pushed through and we got the win. I’m excited to go back home and get some more wins.”

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Though fourth-year forward Wiggins has proven far more durable than Embiid, he didn’t impact the game as much as his fellow Jayhawk this night. Wiggins shot 8-for-24 from the floor and 1-for-7 on 3-pointers, while scoring 20 points and grabbing seven boards.

His most impressive highlight came when he stole a bad Embiid pass and scored over the 7-foot-2 center.

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The Timberwolves dropped to 16-12 but currently occupy the No. 4 slot in the Western Conference standings. Philly (14-13) is tied with Detroit and New York for the seventh-best record in the East.

Sacramento Kings guard Frank Mason III, right, goes to the basket against Toronto Raptors center Jakob Poeltl, during the second half of an NBA basketball game, Sunday, Dec. 10, 2017, in Sacramento, Calif. The Raptors won 102-87. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

Sacramento Kings guard Frank Mason III, right, goes to the basket against Toronto Raptors center Jakob Poeltl, during the second half of an NBA basketball game, Sunday, Dec. 10, 2017, in Sacramento, Calif. The Raptors won 102-87. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

Unlike Embiid and Wiggins, neither Mason nor Jackson are likely to make their playoff debuts this season.

But Mason stayed on his recent upward trend, playing more minutes than Kings lottery pick De’Aaron Fox versus Phoenix.

Mason only shot 2-for-8 and scored 6 points, but he also contributed 4 rebounds, 4 assists and even a blocked shot of Suns guard Tyler Ullis.

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The rookie backup point guard’s plus/minus of +9 was the second-best in Sacramento’s box score, and he played the entire fourth quarter of the Kings’ win.

Jackson, meanwhile, had one of the worst shooting nights of his young career, going 3-for-14, while scoring 7 points and adding 5 boards and 2 assists in 30 minutes, in his seventh start.

The No. 4 overall pick in the 2017 draft is averaging 9.2 points, 3.6 rebounds and 1.1 assists, and shooting 38.5% from the floor and 23.9% on 3-pointers (17-for-71).

Reply 9 comments from Oddgirltoo Surrealku Rockn_chalkn_ku Roger Ortega David Serven Shimsham Stupidmichael

Counting down the most interesting KU players to watch this 2017-18 NBA season: Nos. 5-1

Washington Wizards forward Markieff Morris, left, dunks the ball while Atlanta Hawks forward Kent Bazemore, right, watches during the first half in Game 1 of a first-round NBA basketball playoff series, in Washington, Sunday, April 16, 2017. The Wizards won 114-107. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Washington Wizards forward Markieff Morris, left, dunks the ball while Atlanta Hawks forward Kent Bazemore, right, watches during the first half in Game 1 of a first-round NBA basketball playoff series, in Washington, Sunday, April 16, 2017. The Wizards won 114-107. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

It’s tip-off week in the NBA, and for Kansas basketball fans that means it’s time to catch up with the whereabouts and chances for may former Allen Fieldhouse stars who now call The Association home.

Paul Pierce has retired, Thomas Robinson is playing overseas and Brandon Rush just got waived by Milwaukee. But 16 Jayhawks still appear on the league’s 30 rosters as the 82-game grind commences.

Some former Kansas standouts will be easier to find on national games and streaming highlights than others. To help those who love college basketball far more than the NBA, we decided to rank KU’s current pros, counting down from No. 16 to No. 1, in terms of which players will be the most interesting to follow in the months to come.

Remember, this isn’t a list of who’s best. We’re talking about which players you’ll want to make a point to watch when you see their team is playing on TV (or on your tablet or phone or laptop).

— Most interesting 'Hawks in the NBA: Nos. 10-6 —

— Most interesting 'Hawks in the NBA: Nos. 16-11 —

5. Markieff Morris

Now that he and twin brother Marcus have been acquitted of aggravated assault in a case dating back to their old F.O.E. stomping grounds in Phoenix, Markieff Morris can get back to plugging into one of the NBA’s most cohesive starting lineups, in Washington.

A hernia could have the Wizards’ Morris out for another month or so, and guards John Wall and Bradley Beal will be glad to have the 6-foot-10 forward back in the mix when he’s healthy again. In 2016-17, his sixth professional season and first full go-round with Washington, Morris put up 14.0 points on 45.7-percent shooting, and achieved career-highs with 71 3-pointers and 36.2-percent accuracy from downtown, as well as new personal bests of 6.5 rebounds per game and 83.7-percent shooting at the free-throw line.

Morris’ teammates love him for his diverse skill set, but also his toughness and trash-talking. They’ll miss all of those as he watches the first few weeks of the season from the bench. But Morris assured The Washington Post they’ll still hear from him while he rehabs his way back to full health.

“I’m a student of the game already, so I just want to give them input on what I see out there,” Morris said. “Still talk my lil’ [expletive] to the other team.”

4. Marcus Morris

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A crazy NBA offseason, filled with waves of transactions and trades, landed Marcus Morris with one of twin brother Markieff’s least favorite opponents, the Boston Celtics.

No, Marcus’s wonder-twin powers haven’t hampered him with hernia sympathy pains for Markieff, but like his brother the Celtics’ Morris begins the season on the mend. Knee soreness kept the former Rocket, Sun and Piston out of Boston’s lineup in its first two games.

It could be a week or two until Morris makes his Celtics debut, according to what coach Brad Stevens told ESPN. Because the Morris twins’ assault trial kept Marcus out for a chunk of training camp, Stevens said the team wants to effectively extend his preseason after the likely starting forward played in just one exhibition.

"I think we're going to be a better basketball team with Marcus available, but he's not," Stevens told ESPN. "We're going to need other people to step up."

Morris made a career-high 118 3-pointers in his final season with the Pistons, but made just 33.1 percent from deep. He averaged 14.0 points, 4.6 boards and 2.0 assists a year ago, and Boston will need even more production from him than expected after all-star Gordon Hayward suffered a horrific leg injury in the season-opener, dislocating his left ankle and fracturing his tibia.

3. Andrew Wiggins

Minnesota Timberwolves forward Andrew Wiggins #22 and Los Angeles Lakers forward Brandon Ingram #14 in actions during an NBA preseason basketball game between Los Angeles Lakers and Minnesota Timberwolves in Anaheim, Calif., Saturday, Sept. 30, 2017. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)

Minnesota Timberwolves forward Andrew Wiggins #22 and Los Angeles Lakers forward Brandon Ingram #14 in actions during an NBA preseason basketball game between Los Angeles Lakers and Minnesota Timberwolves in Anaheim, Calif., Saturday, Sept. 30, 2017. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)

Still just 22 years old with years of upside in front of him, former No. 1 overall pick Andrew Wiggins looks to be fixture in Minnesota’s bright future after signing a five-year, $148 million extension before the season started.

Despite averaging 23.6 points and 4.0 rebounds and making a career-best 35.6 percent of his 3-pointers in his third season, Wiggins often caught flack for not doing more than scoring. He was accused of falling far short of his defensive potential, as a 6-8 wing with the bounce and wingspan to become devastating on that end of the floor.

Now that Wiggins is in his second year in coach Tom Thibodeau’s system and has all-star wing Jimmy Butler to learn from, the young Canadian could be close to making a significant leap as a pro.

Wiggins looked like a surefire NBA-level defender in his one season playing for Bill Self at KU. So far he hasn’t lived up to those expectations. If/when he does and learns how to become a more active rebounder and willing passer, Minnesota will be thankful.

It’s not all going to come together overnight or even over the course of one season. But Wiggins still has the majority of his career ahead of him and the potential — and time — to develop into a special player.

2. Josh Jackson

Phoenix Suns forward Josh Jackson (20) advances the ball up-court on a fast break as Utah Jazz forward Ekpe Udoh defends during the first half of a preseason NBA basketball game Monday, Oct. 9, 2017, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Ralph Freso)

Phoenix Suns forward Josh Jackson (20) advances the ball up-court on a fast break as Utah Jazz forward Ekpe Udoh defends during the first half of a preseason NBA basketball game Monday, Oct. 9, 2017, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Ralph Freso)

In a loaded rookie draft class, Josh Jackson was passed over by Philadelphia, the Los Angeles Lakers and Boston. The 6-foot-8 forward might have been too much of a questionable shooter to go in the top three picks, but Jackson also possesses the type of personality that could enable him to spend the rest of his career making those teams regret their decisions.

After one particular preseason display, Phoenix head coach Earl Watson compared the 20-year-old Jackson to the rookie-year version one of the league’s most fiery competitors, now reigning MVP Russell Westbrook.

“Very exciting to watch,” Watson told AZCentral.com. “Shooting the ball great from (3-point range). We knew that would eventually would happen. It’s before we thought it would happen. And sometimes, like Russ, it leads to turnovers. Reminds me of Russ but his future is bright. We want to encourage him to see the game. He moves so fast. Just slow down and make decisions.”

To Watson’s point, Jackson averaged 4.8 turnovers per exhibition in the preseason with a turnover percentage of 27.4% according to RealGM.com. A mature basketball prospect aware of his flaws, Jackson told AZCentral.com he quickly has learned the NBA is “more of a thinking game” than what he encountered in the college ranks.

“A lot of my turnovers have come from not being able to read what the defense is doing and trying to force a play when it wasn’t there,” Jackson said. “You can still play fast while doing all those things at the same time.”

The Suns love Jackson’s awareness and potential, and envision him as a possible future star to pair with young 2-guard Devin Booker. Between his defense, floor vision and ability to create and finish, Jackson’s rookie season figures to be a blast for Phoenix fans to watch, even though his flashes will come on a young team destined to lose a ton of games.

None by The Crossover

In his NBA debut Wednesday night, Jackson scored11 points on 4-for-10 shooting, to go with two rebounds. He didn’t record a turnover or an assist in a 124-76 home loss to Portland.

1. Joel Embiid

Philadelphia 76ers center Joel Embiid (21) goes to the basket against Washington Wizards forward Jason Smith, left, during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017, in Washington. Smith was charged with a foul on the play.(AP Photo/Nick Wass)

Philadelphia 76ers center Joel Embiid (21) goes to the basket against Washington Wizards forward Jason Smith, left, during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017, in Washington. Smith was charged with a foul on the play.(AP Photo/Nick Wass)

One of the most intriguing players in the league due to his checkered past of injuries and seemingly unlimited potential when he’s actually on the floor, Joel Embiid could be an all-star this year.

Or he could suffer another setback that makes him irrelevant to Philadelphia’s wins and losses. No one knows for sure and that’s a large part of what makes every step of the 7-foot-2 phenom’s story so fascinating.

The guy is a showman and as talented a center as the league may see for years to come. What’s more, even he is sick of the restrictions the 76ers have placed on his availability over the past year-plus as they try to protect their investment.

Prior to his team’s season-opener, with the organization expecting to play Embiid fewer than 20 minutes, the typically happy big called that idea “----ing b------t" a week removed from signing an extension with the Sixers.

Sure enough, Philadelphia trusted “The Process.” Embiid started versus Washington on opening night and played 27 minutes — still a restriction, for certain, but on par with his playing-time plan as a rookie, before his season ended at 31 games. The face of the franchise, in a 120-115 loss, shot 7-for-15 from the floor, scored 18 points, snatched 13 rebounds, dished three assists and blocked a shot.

If Philadelphia — and the NBA as a whole — is fortunate, Embiid will stay healthy enough over the next six months to continue to flourish and maybe even lead a long-suffering franchise back to the playoffs.

When he’s playing, Embiid qualifies as one of the league’s must-watch talents.

None by Joel Embiid

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