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David Beaty: Iowa State ‘Best 1-8 team in the country’

Kansas head coach David Beaty runs off the field with his first win after beating Rhode Island 55-6 on Saturday, Sept. 3, 2016 at Memorial Stadium.

Kansas head coach David Beaty runs off the field with his first win after beating Rhode Island 55-6 on Saturday, Sept. 3, 2016 at Memorial Stadium. by Nick Krug

Computer rankings for any sport are inherently flawed, as is constantly proven with the men’s basketball NCAA Tournament selection committee’s overuse of the Ratings Percentage Index, more commonly known as RPI.

But as computer rankings go, the Jeff Sagarin Ratings, carried by USA Today, are better than most for both basketball and football.

Sagarin does not tell a pretty tale for Kansas football, which enters Saturday’s contest at Memorial Stadium 1-8 overall and 0-6 in the Big 12, same as Iowa State’s, but not the same when given a deeper look.

Iowa State’s average margin of defeat in Big 12 play is 11 points, compared to 30 points for Kansas.

“They are a lot better than 1-8,” Kansas coach David Beaty said. “They are the best 1-8 team in the country, maybe one of the best 1-8 teams you ever have seen.”

Sagarin lumps all 128 FBS schools with the lower-division 125 FCS schools and Kansas does not fare well.

Sagarin has Kansas ranked 140th, one spot ahead of Liberty University, coached by Turner Gill, formerly of KU.

In contrast, Iowa State is ranked 79th, one spot ahead of Army, one spot behind Colorado State.

KU’s ranking is the lowest among schools from power-five conferences. Big Ten member Purdue, ranked No. 112 by Sagarin, is the next-lowest.

To get a feel for what schools Sagarin’s computer formula considers to be of similar strength, consider that the 10 ranked ahead of Kansas, from 130 through 139: Idaho, Wofford, Cal Poly-SLO, North Texas, Nevada, North Dakota, Charleston Southern, San Jose State, Princeton, Massachusetts.

Beaty seeks his firs Big 12 win Saturday, which would tie him in that category with Gill, Charlie Weis and Clint Bowen, interim head coach for the final eight games of 2014.

Reply 4 comments from Michael Lorraine Humpy Helsel Ashwingrao Brett McCabe

Ranking Reesing’s successors from No. 1 to No. 9

If Kansas head football coach David Beaty rides the wave Carter Stanely created with an encouraging second-half performance in Morgantown, W.V., and hands him the football Saturday for the 11 p.m. kickoff against Iowa State, Stanley will become the 10th quarterback to start a game for Kansas since Todd Reesing took his skills to the business world.

If Stanley can lead the Jayhawks to an upset of Iowa State, which opened as an 11.5-point favorite, he will move into a four-way tie for first in victories against Big 12 competition during the post-Mark Mangino years.

Here’s how I would rank the post-Reesing starting quarterbacks at Kansas, keeping in mind that the three statistical categories are numbers compiled in games played for the Jayhawks:

Blue Team starting quarterback Michael Cummings his helped off of the field by trainers during the Spring Game on Saturday, April 25, 2015 at Memorial Stadium.

Blue Team starting quarterback Michael Cummings his helped off of the field by trainers during the Spring Game on Saturday, April 25, 2015 at Memorial Stadium. by Nick Krug

1 - Michael Cummings: Short and not a very fast runner, Cummings compensated for his shortcomings with smarts, toughness, decisiveness and leadership ability. In his first game in place of fired Charlie Weis, interim head coach Clint Bowen turned to Cummings at halftime in Morgantown, W.V., and kept him in place for the rest of the season. Cummings didn’t always make the right decision, but his lack of hesitation injected the offense with missing peppiness. He led KU to a 34-14 victory against Iowa State, throwing for 278 yards and a touchdown. His career ended in the spring exhibition of 2016 when in the heat of battle, a teammate tackled him, a no-no for a QB wearing a red jersey, and blew out his ACL. The one chance at a happy Kansas QB story for this decade ended sadly.
Yards per attempt: 6.5.
Touchdowns: 13.
Interceptions: 10.

Missouri's Kenji Jackson sacks Kansas quarterback Jordan Webb in the fourth quarter of the Border War on  Saturday, Nov. 26, 2011 at Arrowhead Stadium.

Missouri's Kenji Jackson sacks Kansas quarterback Jordan Webb in the fourth quarter of the Border War on Saturday, Nov. 26, 2011 at Arrowhead Stadium. by Kevin Anderson

2 - Jordan Webb: He wasn’t big or fast or exceptionally accurate, but he was extremely tough. Took so many punishing hits and kept getting back on his feet. Including 38 times in his one season at Colorado, Webb was sacked 90 times during his three seasons as a college quarterback.
Yards per attempt: 6.2.
Touchdowns: 20.
Interceptions: 20.

Kansas quarterback Quinn Mecham is driven to the turf on a sack by Oklahoma State defensive end Jamie Blatnick (50) during the third quarter, Saturday, Nov. 20, 2010 at Kivisto Field. Also assisting on the stop is OSU safety Markelle Martin.

Kansas quarterback Quinn Mecham is driven to the turf on a sack by Oklahoma State defensive end Jamie Blatnick (50) during the third quarter, Saturday, Nov. 20, 2010 at Kivisto Field. Also assisting on the stop is OSU safety Markelle Martin. by Nick Krug

3 - Quinn Mecham: The most accurate passer on this list, but also had the weakest arm. It didn’t take defenses long to figure that out and once they did, he returned to the bench. Also lacked mobility. Still, he is only one of three post-Reesing field generals to lead Jayhawks to victory in a Big 12 game. Completed 23 of 28 passes for 252 yards in 52-45 comeback triumph vs. Colorado.
Yards per attempt: 5.6.
Touchdowns: 6.
Interceptions: 5.

Kansas quarterback Jake Heaps is sacked by Oklahoma defenders Charles Tapper (91) and Geneo Grissom on the Jayhawks' last drive of the game, Saturday, Oct. 19, 2013 at Memorial Stadium.

Kansas quarterback Jake Heaps is sacked by Oklahoma defenders Charles Tapper (91) and Geneo Grissom on the Jayhawks' last drive of the game, Saturday, Oct. 19, 2013 at Memorial Stadium. by Nick Krug

4 - Jake Heaps: Bad fit. It got to where it almost appeared as if Heaps began ducking for cover the instant he finished the snap count. Performed so well in practice, but didn’t have the ability to make something out of nothing. Beat out at BYU, he transferred to Kansas. Beat out at Kansas, he transferred to Miami, where he was unable to secure the starting job.
Yards per attempt: 5.4.
Touchdowns: 8.
Interceptions: 10.

Kansas quarterback Montell Cozart (2) is run out of bounds by Ohio linebacker Chad Moore (38) late in the fourth quarter on Saturday, Sept. 10, 2016 at Memorial Stadium.

Kansas quarterback Montell Cozart (2) is run out of bounds by Ohio linebacker Chad Moore (38) late in the fourth quarter on Saturday, Sept. 10, 2016 at Memorial Stadium. by Nick Krug

5 - Montell Cozart: Doesn’t have a natural feel for when to tuck it and run, which is a shame because he's so fast. Has a strong arm, but has struggled with accuracy throughout his career. His lone Big 12 victory, 31-19 against West Virginia came when he threw for 61 yards and rushed for 60 as a freshman.
Yards per attempt: 5.7.
Touchdowns: 14.
Interceptions: 19.

Kansas quarterback Ryan Willis (13) throws his helmet in frustration after throwing his second interception of the game during the second quarter on Saturday, Oct. 15, 2016 at McLane Stadium in Waco, Texas.

Kansas quarterback Ryan Willis (13) throws his helmet in frustration after throwing his second interception of the game during the second quarter on Saturday, Oct. 15, 2016 at McLane Stadium in Waco, Texas. by Nick Krug

6 - Ryan Willis: Too many sacks and too many turnovers in two weeks as starter earlier this season resulted in him bypassing second string on his way down.
Yards per attempt: 5.9.
Touchdowns: 12.
Interceptions: 17.

Dayne Crist (10) is sacked in the second half of KU's 30-23 loss to Northern Illinois Huskies Saturday, September 22, 2012, at Huskie Stadium in DeKalb, Ill. At top is left tackle Tanner Hawkinson.

Dayne Crist (10) is sacked in the second half of KU's 30-23 loss to Northern Illinois Huskies Saturday, September 22, 2012, at Huskie Stadium in DeKalb, Ill. At top is left tackle Tanner Hawkinson. by Mike Yoder

7 - Dayne Crist: Billed as the second coming by Charlie Weis, who had recruited him to Notre Dame, it turned out Crist couldn’t walk on water, or even pass on chalked grass very well.

Yards per attempt: 6.1.
Touchdowns: 4.
Interceptions: 9.

Kansas quarterback Kale Pick pulls back to pass as he is hit by North Dakota State defensive tackle Matthew Gratzek during the fourth quarter, Saturday, Sept. 4, 2010 at Kivisto Field.

Kansas quarterback Kale Pick pulls back to pass as he is hit by North Dakota State defensive tackle Matthew Gratzek during the fourth quarter, Saturday, Sept. 4, 2010 at Kivisto Field. by Nick Krug

8 - Kale Pick: "I," as in incomplete, is the only fair grade to give him because he lost his starting job three quarters into the 2010 season-opener, a 6-3 loss to North Dakota State. But this isn’t a letter-grade, rather a number ranking. Had a solid career as a receiver and now is coaching quarterbacks at Fort Scott Community College.
Yards per attempt: 5.2.
Touchdowns: 0.
Interceptions: 1.

Kansas quarterback Deondre Ford (15) is chased by Rutgers linebacker Darnell Davis Jr. (59) during the first quarter on Saturday, Sept. 26, 2015 at High Point Solutions Stadium in Piscataway, New Jersey. Ford was the starting quarterback for the Jayhawks.

Kansas quarterback Deondre Ford (15) is chased by Rutgers linebacker Darnell Davis Jr. (59) during the first quarter on Saturday, Sept. 26, 2015 at High Point Solutions Stadium in Piscataway, New Jersey. Ford was the starting quarterback for the Jayhawks. by Nick Krug

9 - Deondre Ford: Pressed into starting duty at Rutgers in 2015, Ford was injured, missed the rest of the season, and has not reappeared in a game. He threw more picks than touchdowns at Dodge City Community College.
Yards per attempt: 5.7.
Touchdowns: 0.
Interceptions: 1.

Reply 7 comments from Mo Mosallaei Dirk Medema Michael Lorraine Bsieckman Tom Keegan Humpy Helsel Brett McCabe

Say something nice about Kansas football: Carter Stanley makes it interesting

Kansas quarterback Carter Stanley (9) heaves a pass around Baylor linebacker Raaquan Davis (19) during the third quarter on Saturday, Oct. 15, 2016 at McLane Stadium in Waco, Texas.

Kansas quarterback Carter Stanley (9) heaves a pass around Baylor linebacker Raaquan Davis (19) during the third quarter on Saturday, Oct. 15, 2016 at McLane Stadium in Waco, Texas. by Nick Krug

Finally, a little intrigue spices the stagnant-so-long air hovering over another dismal Kansas football season.

Thank redshirt freshman quarterback Carter Stanley for supplying it by running the offense more sharply than any KU quarterback has in quite some time Saturday in a 48-21 loss at West Virginia in a game that Kansas trailed 31-0 at the half.

Beaty used Stanley as his second-string QB for the second consecutive week, a promotion from third-string status. Not all of Stanley’s work in Morgantown came against the second string. He entered in the third quarter after starter Montell Cozart was shaken up and according to head coach David Beaty showed some concussion symptoms.

Stanley’s statistics — he completed 9 of 11 passes for 127 yards and two touchdowns with one interception — were impressive, but more than that, he looked like he knew what he was doing running the offense. He looked decisive, scanned the entire field looking for receivers, made the defense respect his running ability, and other than on an interception in the end zone on which his throw was wide left, to the side where the tightest coverage on LaQuvionte Gonzalez was located, he was pretty accurate.

Stanley’s threat as a runner made a defender freeze for a second, which enabled speedy running back Taylor Martin to run right past the defender to open space, where Stanley found Martin with a short pass that KU’s fastest runner turned into a 42-yard touchdown.

Less than half of one game does not a quarterback drought cure and questions remain about Stanley — arm strength, the swiftness of his release, two interceptions in 32 throws — but his encouraging performance at least gave KU football fans a reason to watch the Iowa State game Saturday. No point in not turning the offense over to Stanley for the final three weeks to see if he is a legitimate candidate to join a spring football competition that will include Tyriek Starks, a New Orleans high school recruit spending his first year at Kansas as a redshirt, plus in all likelihood a junior college or graduate transfer not yet in the Kansas program.

A forgotten man as recently as a few days ago, Stanley is back in the QB conversation. Even so, he has a long way to go before becoming as famous as a musician who entertained so many before his life came to a tragic end.

Reply 14 comments from Nativerock Michael Maris Tom Keegan Matt Schierlman Maxhawk Ohiostate1ncaa Dale Rogers Brian Hosfelt Michael Lorraine Steve Corder and 4 others

Cubs curse dies the night K-State hex marches on

Kansas State president Kirk Schulz laughs after speaking to reporters after the Big 12 conference meeting Friday, Feb. 5, 2016, in Irving, Texas. Schulz will soon leave K-State to become president at Washington State University. (AP Photo/LM Otero)

Kansas State president Kirk Schulz laughs after speaking to reporters after the Big 12 conference meeting Friday, Feb. 5, 2016, in Irving, Texas. Schulz will soon leave K-State to become president at Washington State University. (AP Photo/LM Otero)

One old sports curse finally perished Wednesday night, a few hours after a newer one mushroomed. First, a word on the curse that died a stormy death in Cleveland.

William "Billy Goat" Sianis, owner of the Billy Goat Tavern in Chicago, purchased two tickets to the 1945 World Series. His second ticket was for his billy goat, Murphy. The goat was denied admission and when Sianis pleaded with Cubs owner P.K. Wrigley for an explanation, Wrigley said, "Because the goat stinks." Legend has it that Sianis was so fumed at Wrigley that he put a curse on the Cubs and said they never would win a World Series so long as the goat was denied admission.

The curse finally died. Although extra innings and a rain delay extended it for a while, the Cubs finally won their first World Series since 1908.

Meanwhile, the Curse of the Kirky Gloat continued when Kansas defeated K-State in five sets. What, you never have heard of the Curse of the Kirky Gloat? That's because I just invented it, but it was inspired by an actual event and what has happened since is downright spooky.

Cue the scary recordings if you have any left over from Halloween.

Here's what happened: Kirk Schulz, president at Kansas State from 2009 to March, 2016, enjoyed sports and the spotlight, so when the Wildcats advanced to the 2011 Sweet 16 in the NCAA volleyball tournament, the prez could not resist gloating. He Tweeted a photograph of the Sweet 16 banner that was unfurled the following season and he typed a message along the lines of, "The only school in the state of Kansas that has one of these."

Mistake. Big, big mistake. Volleyball gods don't dig braggarts.

Since the Tweet that flew off the fingers of Schulz, now the head honcho at Washington State, Kansas has defeated Kansas State in all five trips to Manhattan and has enjoyed its most successful stretch ever. Since the Tweet created the Curse of the Kirky Gloat, Kansas has been to four NCAA tournaments, a Sweet 16 and a Final Four. Kansas State has made it to three NCAA tournaments without advancing past the first round.

It has to be the curse's fault because as was illustrated again Wednesday night inside Ahearn Field House, the Wildcats have outstanding fan support with students doing everything they can to distract the visitor without getting low-class about it. And the well-coached volleyball team is loaded with scrappy, smart, powerful players. Has to be the curse. What else could it be, but the Curse of the Kirky Gloat?

Interestingly, the urban dictionary defines the word, "kirky," as "god of lightweight."

Schulz, no doubt, accomplished many positive things during his tenure in Manhattan, but the Tweet that created the curse was a lightweight move all the way. Will it lead to a 108-year drought? Doubtful, but five years are down with only 103 to go.

Reply 2 comments from Oldjayhawkjack Michael Lorraine

Washburn coach lauds former player Gary Woodland, current Jayhawks

Washburn coach Bob Chipman surveys the action on the floor during one of Washburn's recent trips to Allen Fieldhouse to take on the Jayhawks in exhibition play.

Washburn coach Bob Chipman surveys the action on the floor during one of Washburn's recent trips to Allen Fieldhouse to take on the Jayhawks in exhibition play. by Gene Cassell/Washburn sports information

Gary Woodland and wife, Gabby, had a front-row seat across the court from the Washburn bench upon which the PGA tour player once sat. Woodland scored three points in his freshman season in the exhibition against Kansas, before transferring to KU to play golf for Ross Randall.

"I made him dive on the floor once, I made him mad, I think he broke a finger. I'm still kind of regretting that one, but Gary could shoot it," Washburn coach Bob Chipman said. "I remember one game against Northwest (Missouri State), and Northwest is our big opponent, Gary had five threes the second half. He could shoot it. He was an all-state basketball player, great athlete."

Suggestion: Turn down the audio before watching the video of Woodland playing for Topeka Heights High or your ears might bleed to death.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3C8FNMMcKc8

Woodland finished 39th on the 2016 PGA Tour money list with $2,392,044.30 and finished 20th in the Fed Ex Cup standings to qualify for all the major tournaments for the 2017 season, which already has started.

Chipman said he will seek his former player's advice as to which golf clubs he should get to replace the ones Bill Self presented to him as a retirement gift. Chipman, retiring at the end of this, his 38th season as head coach of the Ichabods, ranks third on the Div. II all-time list with 788 victories.

In much the way someone wraps picture of a present that will be delivered in the future, Self threw some old golf clubs in a bag and made it clear they will be replaced by new ones.

"KU is so classy," Chipman said. "Bill is just incredible. I just really can't believe how fantastic they are in every way, such a class program. You watch, that team — it was the first game, both teams were pretty ragged, a lot of turnovers — but that KU team is going to be one of the, probably the most fun KU team to watch in recent history before Bill's done with them. They're going to be fantastic."

Reply 2 comments from Joe Ross The_muser

Stronger Frank Mason gives credit to Andrea Hudy

Kansas guard Frank Mason III (0) gets to the bucket against Washburn during the first half, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas guard Frank Mason III (0) gets to the bucket against Washburn during the first half, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016 at Allen Fieldhouse. by Nick Krug

Frank Mason looked thicker, stronger during the Bill Self Basketball Camp games. In Tuesday night's exhibition opener against Washburn, Mason looked as if he might even have increased his already jaw-dropping vertical leap.

“I’m not sure, but I’ve been working hard with (strength and conditioning coach Andrea) Hudy all summer and all fall and she got my legs stronger, upper body stronger, everything," Mason said. "Just proud to have Hudy in my life and have her help me and I get the best instructions from her.”

Mason got way up for there for some of his 10 rebounds, nine at the defensive end. Backcourt mate Devonte Graham also soared high, ripping one of his four defensive rebounds from the air with one hand.

Mason, with 21 points, 10 rebounds and nine assists, easily was KU's best player in the exhibition opener, although he had three turnovers. Graham (nine points, three assists) had a quieter night, but turned it over just once.

It's too early to say the Jayhawks have the best backcourt in the nation, but they definitely rank high in the conversation.

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Kansas open to recruiting another quarterback in this class

Kansas quarterback Montell Cozart (2) passes against Oklahoma during the first half of an NCAA college football game in Norman, Okla., Saturday, Oct.29, 2016.

Kansas quarterback Montell Cozart (2) passes against Oklahoma during the first half of an NCAA college football game in Norman, Okla., Saturday, Oct.29, 2016. by Alonzo Adams/The Associated Press

Kansas football coach David Beaty seems to remember everything he ever has heard from head coaches who have engineered successful rebuilding projects. He shared one of those pointers Tuesday.

"He talked a lot about how he wants to make each room a little bit better each year," Beaty said.

Even the quarterback room?

"We'll look at anything and everything to make our rooms better, including quarterback," Beaty said.

Beaty went into the season figuring that red-shirting quarterback Tyriek Starks was all the insurance the team needs at quarterback. Coaches always have to keep an open mind to recruiting needs changing and the quarterback spot again has left much lacking. There is no guarantee Starks will be ready to take over next fall and it's always wise to have insurance against injuries.

Cozart and Deondre Ford are juniors, Ryan Willis a sophomore, Carter Stanley a freshman.

Reply 4 comments from Dirk Medema Michael Lorraine Humpy Helsel Brett McCabe

Linebacker Joe Dineen out for season

Kansas linebacker Joe Dineen Jr. (29) pressures Ohio quarterback Greg Windham (14) during the third quarter on Saturday, Sept. 10, 2016 at Memorial Stadium.

Kansas linebacker Joe Dineen Jr. (29) pressures Ohio quarterback Greg Windham (14) during the third quarter on Saturday, Sept. 10, 2016 at Memorial Stadium. by Nick Krug

Kansas linebacker Joe Dineen, out with a hamstring injury, will miss the remainder of the season, head coach David Beaty announced at his weekly Tuesday press conference.

Dineen suffered the injury in the Memphis game the third week of the season, which means that he is eligible for a medical redshirt, which will keep the junior in the program through the 2018 season.

“He’s been working feverishly to get back," Beaty said. "He cannot stand his life without football right now.”

Each time Dineen thought he made progress, he suffered a setback.

Beaty said that freshman running back Khalil Herbert (toe injury) is questionable and added that center Joe Gibson, who missed the Oklahoma game with a recurring neck injury, "is progressing pretty good."

Defensive end Dorance Armstrong, who missed fall camp after on the first day going down with an injury that Beaty called, "a partially torn ACL." Beaty said that Armstrong tells him he does not feel anything wrong with the knee now and the coach said he does not anticipate him needing offseason surgery.

Reply 1 comment from David Robinett

Say something nice about Kansas football: Those aren’t boos, they’re ‘Moos’

Kansas' Cole Moos (36) punts from the Jayhawks' end zone late in the fourth quarter on Saturday, Oct. 15, 2016 at McLane Stadium in Waco, Texas.

Kansas' Cole Moos (36) punts from the Jayhawks' end zone late in the fourth quarter on Saturday, Oct. 15, 2016 at McLane Stadium in Waco, Texas. by Nick Krug

Kansas is in a prolonged slump in the kicker department, but has had better results with punters in most recent seasons.

Cole Moos averages 41.7 yards per punt, good for sixth in the Big 12. More hang time might result in a better net punting average of 37.5, ninth in the conference, but the punt team tacklers are at least partially responsible for that figure.

After the 49-7 loss to Baylor, Moos was named Big 12 Special Teams Player of the Week afer averaging 50.3 points per game and drilling punts of 82 and 73 yards.

A junior, Moos came to Kansas from Northeast Oklahoma A&M College, a junior college.

It figures that Kansas has no trouble attracting punters to school. Athletes prefer playing to watching and at least until Kansas is able to recruit and develop quarterbacks and offensive linemen better than in recent years, the punter will get plenty of action. Moos’ nine punts at Oklahoma wasn’t even a season-high. He punted 10 times at Texas Tech.

Moos is no Trevor Pardula, who averaged 44 yards a punt in his two seasons, but is an upgrade from Eric Kahn, who averaged 34 punts a game last season.

Recruiting kickers isn’t as easy because athletes prefer playing to watching. Kansas ranks last in the Big 12 in touchdowns (19) and tied with Oklahoma for last in field goals (seven).

The Jayhawks have reason to believe they will have a more accurate field-goal kicker next season, having gained a verbal commitment from Liam Jones from Choctaw, Okla.

Reply 3 comments from Dale Rogers Dirk Medema Maxhawk

Say something nice about Kansas football: Those aren’t boos, they’re ‘Moos’

Kansas' Cole Moos (36) punts from the Jayhawks' end zone late in the fourth quarter on Saturday, Oct. 15, 2016 at McLane Stadium in Waco, Texas.

Kansas' Cole Moos (36) punts from the Jayhawks' end zone late in the fourth quarter on Saturday, Oct. 15, 2016 at McLane Stadium in Waco, Texas. by Nick Krug

Kansas is in a prolonged slump in the kicker department, but has had better results with punters in most recent seasons.

Cole Moos averages 41.7 yards per punt, good for sixth in the Big 12. More hang time might result in a better net punting average of 37.5, ninth in the conference, but the punt team tacklers are at least partially responsible for that figure.

After the 49-7 loss to Baylor, Moos was named Big 12 Special Teams Player of the Week afer averaging 50.3 points per game and drilling punts of 82 and 73 yards.

A junior, Moos came to Kansas from Northeast Oklahoma A&M College, a junior college.

It figures that Kansas has no trouble attracting punters to school. Athletes prefer playing to watching and at least until Kansas is able to recruit and develop quarterbacks and offensive linemen better than in recent years, the punter will get plenty of action. Moos’ nine punts at Oklahoma wasn’t even a season-high. He punted 10 times at Texas Tech.

Moos is no Trevor Pardula, who averaged 44 yards a punt in his two seasons, but is an upgrade from Eric Kahn, who averaged 34 punts a game last season.

Recruiting kickers isn’t as easy because athletes prefer playing to watching. Kansas ranks last in the Big 12 in touchdowns (19) and tied with Oklahoma for last in field goals (seven).

The Jayhawks have reason to believe they will have a more accurate field-goal kicker next season, having gained a verbal commitment from Liam Jones from Choctaw, Okla.

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