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A look at Big 12 NBA draft history

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Kansas' Andrew Wiggins answers questions during an interview after being selected as the number one pick overall by the Cleveland Cavaliers during the 2014 NBA draft, Thursday, June 26, 2014, in New York. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

Kansas' Andrew Wiggins answers questions during an interview after being selected as the number one pick overall by the Cleveland Cavaliers during the 2014 NBA draft, Thursday, June 26, 2014, in New York. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

Rob Carolla, director of communications for the Big 12, distributed interesting NBA draft facts from the conference.

Such as:

The Big 12 has had 28 lottery picks since 2000, which puts the conference second behind the ACC (31). Others: Big East 27, SEC 25, Pac-12 24, Big Ten 19.

The ACC also ranks first over the same period in first-round draft picks with 40, followed by the Pac-12 (33), Big 12 and SEC (28), Big East (24) and Big Ten (20).

Big 12 players drafted in the past 19 years: Kansas 28, Texas 17, Iowa State and Oklahoma State 8, Baylor and Oklahoma 7, Texas Tech 3, Kansas State 2.

Blake Griffin in 2009 and Andrew Wiggins in 2014 are the lone Big 12 players taken with the first pick of the draft. Three players were chosen with the second overall pick: LaMarcus Aldridge, 2006, Kevin Durant, 2007, Michael Beasley, 2008.

The record for Big 12 players chosen in one draft is 10, set in 2008 and tied in 2010.

The five Kansas players chosen in 2008 is a Big 12 record for one school in one draft. Brandon Rush was the first player chosen from the reigning national champions with the 13th pick, followed by Darrell Arthur (27th), Mario Chalmers (34th), Darnell Jackson (52nd) and Sasha Kaun (56th).

Oklahoma guard Buddy Hield (24) roars after hitting a three against the Jayhawks during the second half, Saturday, Feb. 13, 2016 at Lloyd Noble Center in Norman, Okla.

Oklahoma guard Buddy Hield (24) roars after hitting a three against the Jayhawks during the second half, Saturday, Feb. 13, 2016 at Lloyd Noble Center in Norman, Okla. by Nick Krug

Although the Big 12 has had nine players or more taken in a draft three times since 2008, nobody expects anywhere near that total this season.

Draftexpress.com projects just four players: 5. Buddy Hield (Oklahoma), 23. Cheick Diallo (Kansas), 50. Wayne Selden (Kansas), 54. Isaiah Cousins.

The consensus seems to be that Perry Ellis won’t hear his name called in tonight’s draft, which wouldn’t necessarily be a bad thing. It would enable him, with the help of his agent, to select the team that best fits his talents, the roster that gives him the best shot at making the team.

It will be interesting to look back in 10 years to see which KU player eligible for this year’s draft plays the most NBA minutes. My guess: Ellis. Your guess?

Comments

Suzi Marshall 3 years, 7 months ago

The '17 NBA Draft could be a big one for Kansas. I think we could have 3 players (Jackson, Mykailiuk, and Bragg) go in the lottery or at-least the first round.

Scott Proch 3 years, 7 months ago

I'm going to go with the athletic guard, Wayne Seldon. A little patience while he gets his '3' more consistent and he can contribute a bunch to almost anyone. He improved so much between his Soph and Jr seasons.

Dale Rogers 3 years, 7 months ago

I wonder.... if you add up the number of teams in the Big12 each year since 2000 and then do the same for the ACC, then you could determine how many lottery picks per available team. That would be more meaningful to me than just the number of lottery picks per conference. For example, to use an extreme number as an example, if conference A has just 2 teams and had 12 lottery picks in 10 years, that's 12 lottery picks for 20 team-years. And conference B had 15 lottery picks but had 10 teams each of those years, that's 15 lottery picks for 100 team-years. So, conference A, which had just 12 lottery picks produced 0.60 lottery picks per team per year while conference B, with 15 lottery picks produced just 0.15 lottery picks per team per year. Conference A, with just 12 lottery picks was four times as productive as Conference B with 15 lottery picks.

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