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Sunday, May 9, 2021

Da’Jon Terry leaving KU football for Tennessee

Defensive tackle Da'Jon Terry looks into the backfield during a Kansas football spring practice, in April of 2021.

Defensive tackle Da'Jon Terry looks into the backfield during a Kansas football spring practice, in April of 2021.

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It didn’t take long for another Power Five program to welcome in Da’Jon Terry once the former Kansas football defensive lineman opted to leave the Jayhawks.

Four days after Terry announced he was entering the transfer portal, the athletic young tackle committed on Sunday evening to play at Tennessee.

A redshirt sophomore who completed the spring practice schedule with KU, only to transition out of the program just as new head coach Lance Leipold came in, Terry was listed at 6-foot-4 and 320 pounds most recently with the Jayhawks.

In an interview with Matt Ray of SI Now’s VR2, Terry said his time at KU “really helped” him.

"I redshirted my first year, and that helped me realized how much went into the game of football,” Terry said. “It was much more than I expected. That helped me learn the scheme of things and learning things like techniques. That is what helped propel me into my redshirt freshman season. Coach (Les) Miles saw a talent in me. I really appreciate (the coaches at KU) for seeing that in me. That is what was really inspiring. A legend like Coach Miles helped me and made me know that I was special at this game, because he is a legend. My defensive coordinator (DJ Eliot) and all of them helped me realize that."

Terry became the first key player on KU’s roster to decide to transfer as Leipold came in as the new head coach. Terry was essentially a lock to start on KU’s defensive line in 2021 before the sophomore from Meridian, Miss., decided to move on, quickly landing in the SEC.

He recorded 14 total tackles while appearing in eight games, and also made two sacks in 2020, his redshirt freshman season at KU. Earlier this month, Terry delivered two tackles for loss in KU’s spring game.

“I am just hoping that I found a family atmosphere and a crowd that loves their team," Terry told SI Now. "I am just ready to go play and get to work and play in front of compassionate fans.”

KU reserve defensive back Valerian Agbaw Jr. also opted to enter the transfer portal and play college football elsewhere.

None by Da'Jon Terry

Comments

Edward Daub 6 months, 3 weeks ago

The most obvious is the hardest to see. The SEC recruited Terry hard.

Today's trivia question is: Name the former Lawrence High Lion who played for the Volunteers and then the NFL 49'ers? Rock Chalk!

Andy Godwin 6 months, 3 weeks ago

The transfer portal as currently designed will make it difficult for programs like KU to hold onto to their top players.

Raymond Wright 6 months, 3 weeks ago

This says everything. “I am just hoping that I found a family atmosphere and a crowd that loves their team,"

Jeff Coffman 6 months, 3 weeks ago

Or switching from a 3-4 to a 4-3 scheme, which directly ties to his role.

Brian Wilson 6 months, 3 weeks ago

Yeah Jeff...sure....that's what he said. It was the scheme!

Omari Miller 6 months, 3 weeks ago

@Edward Daub, the answer is Keith DeLong. Good question!

Bob Strawn 6 months, 3 weeks ago

I can't even imagine the backdoor conversations that are going on with these youngsters now. It's free agency.

Matt Lindaman 6 months, 3 weeks ago

Yes, and wasn't this the program handing out cash in McDonald's bags?? (Taking bag man literally).

Brian Wilson 6 months, 3 weeks ago

OUCH! This is what happens and pretty much true - negative snowflakes in the Admin, Boosters, and Fans have destroyed this program.

Dirk Medema 6 months, 3 weeks ago

Jeff - Switching to a 4-3 means there are 2 DTs instead of 1 so twice the opportunity. I could see if it was the other way around. He was a big kid with potential when DB and company found him and the last program taught him how to live up to his talent. Tennessee is a big time program that has underperformed for quite some time but still draws 6-figure crowds. It would also be much closer to home in at least culture.

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