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Thursday, November 15, 2018

Shane Jackson: With nothing to lose, Beaty should take more chances against OU

Kansas head coach David Beaty takes the field with he Jayhawks prior to kickoff on Saturday, Nov. 10, 2018 at Bill Snyder Family Stadium in Manhattan, Kan.

Kansas head coach David Beaty takes the field with he Jayhawks prior to kickoff on Saturday, Nov. 10, 2018 at Bill Snyder Family Stadium in Manhattan, Kan.

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During a weekend in Vegas this past summer, I placed a $5 bet on an electronic horse racing game, and somehow — much to the chagrin of the rest of the bachelor party — managed to win $150 from that short race.

For the rest of the weekend, I took more chances at the roulette table, or at least as risky of ones as a recent college grad with a pile of student debt could be. After all, I was playing with money that I didn’t deserve to have.

Nobody would blame Kansas head football coach David Beaty for embracing this type of mindset. Beaty, who was told Nov. 4 that he would not be retained at the end of the season, has nothing to lose and can afford to be more reckless with in-game decisions.

That, of course, wasn’t the case against Kansas State during the team’s 21-17 loss in Manhattan.

KU entered the Sunflower Showdown with an identical or better record than K-State for the first time since 2009. That’s why Beaty was probably the same as he’s ever been due to the fact that he believed Kansas had a legitimate shot of notching a win over its in-state rival for the first time since 2008.

But Beaty’s conservativeness was one of the key reasons that the Jayhawks were unable to secure that elusive Governor's Cup.

In the first half alone, Beaty faced two fourth downs in the red zone and chose to kick twice, including once inside the five. At the end of the half, Kansas had a chance to kick a field goal or attempt a Hail Mary from K-State’s 40-yard line.

Instead of either scenario, the Jayhawks let the clock run out after some miscommunication.

“We weren’t going to kick that long of a field goal,” Beaty said. “We just felt like it was too rushed, and if we did get that thing blocked, it could have turned into points for them. We had one other option, and at that time, we didn’t feel like we had the right personnel to get it done.”

Kansas was unable to call a timeout after using all three at inopportune times in the first half. The first one was used when quarterback Peyton Bender tried to audible with the play clock winding down on third down late in the first quarter from the team’s 40-yard line.

The second timeout was also used on third down, this time with eight minutes remaining in the second quarter and on the opponent's 18-yard line. The final timeout, however, was burned on first down on the opposition’s 13-yard line following a roughing the kicker penalty by Kansas State.

As a result, KU did not have a single timeout during its six-play drive that ended near midfield at the half.

"I don't feel bad about the way that we ended the first half," Beaty said. "We weren't close enough to do any of the things that we would all have loved to have done. So we just tried to play the odds and be smart enough to get out of there without having a turnover."

Early in the fourth quarter, KU also had a chance to extend its three-point lead, but elected to punt on 4th-and-4 from the opponent’s 43-yard line.

Those are the types of situations that Beaty has to be more aggressive with during KU’s primetime matchup against No. 6 Oklahoma on Saturday, which will be broadcast on Fox.

The Jayhawks, who are considered 36-point underdogs, have not beat the Sooners in this century. Nobody expects KU to have a chance, and Beaty should have nothing holding him back.

Why not, then, bet something other than the color black on the roulette table?

Comments

Steve Corder 6 months ago

....and a coach without imagination.

Robert Brock 6 months ago

It’s easy to score against the pathetic Oklahoma defense. Will KU score on them? Prolly not...

Ashwin Rao 6 months ago

Would love to see Stanley in the mix.

Jeff Coffman 6 months ago

As long as he doesn't burn any red-shirts, I'm not sure I care how aggressive he is or usually isn't. If he decided not to punt during the game, I'm all for it. If he chooses only to do onside kicks, again I'm all for it.

Richard Duran 6 months ago

Instead of either scenario, the Jayhawks let the clock run out after some miscommunication. In year 4. And he didn't know the kickoff rule! groan....

Richard Duran 6 months ago

Kansas was unable to call a timeout after using all three at inopportune times in the first half. The first one was used when quarterback Peyton Bender tried to audible with the play clock winding down on third down late in the first quarter from the team’s 40-yard line.

The second timeout was also used on third down, this time with eight minutes remaining in the second quarter and on the opponent's 18-yard line. The final timeout, however, was burned on first down on the opposition’s 13-yard line following a roughing the kicker penalty by Kansas State.

As a result, KU did not have a single timeout during its six-play drive that ended near midfield at the half. YEAR 4 AS A BIG 12 HEAD COACH!!!!

Len Shaffer 6 months ago

You said it, Richard.

It never ceases to amaze me how truly terrible a coach Beaty is. And I'm also amazed at how many people have continued to defend him as the evidence has piled up that he has no business being a head coach in D1 (or most likely any college division). As I've said elsewhere, I'm not questioning him as a person; from all accounts, he's a great guy. But that doesn't mean he's capable of leading a college football team.

Is there another coach in America who wouldn't have at least tried a Hail Mary from the 40-yard-line at the end of the first half??? The chances of having an interception returned for a TD are FAR less than the chances of someone catching it in the end zone or of getting a penalty on the defense. I can understand being nervous about risking a FG try, although I would have given it serious consideration, given Rui's range. But even a FG try would have been better than simply giving up any chance to score there.

As for the OU game, I've never understood why ANY coach of a team that's a 36-point underdog wouldn't try every trick play and gimmick in the book (and some that aren't in the book). The chances of beating a team like OU are one in a million anyway, but if you can get in a few trick plays and fool them rather than trying to overpower them or outrace them, you at least have a slightly better shot at it.

Randy Bombardier 6 months ago

Hope he chooses to not punt from anywhere beyond our 40 yard line if it's less than 5 yards for a first down.

Try a fake punt.

Try a fake field goal

Try an onside kick.

Doubt that these have even been practised. Never mind.

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