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Originally published December 3, 2018 at 06:10p.m., updated December 3, 2018 at 08:53p.m.

Former KU football coach Turner Gill retires

FILE — Liberty head coach Turner Gill looks on during an injury break in the second half of an NCAA college football game against Auburn, Saturday, Nov. 17, 2018, in Auburn, Ala. (AP Photo/Vasha Hunt)

FILE — Liberty head coach Turner Gill looks on during an injury break in the second half of an NCAA college football game against Auburn, Saturday, Nov. 17, 2018, in Auburn, Ala. (AP Photo/Vasha Hunt)

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Former Kansas football coach Turner Gill announced Monday he is retiring from his position as head coach at Liberty University, effective immediately.

Gill, 56, stated in a press release his decision to step away from the profession was tied to his wife Gayle’s heart condition, something she was diagnosed with in 2016.

“Both Gayle and I wanted to be here to help Liberty through their transition,” Gill stated, “and we are so glad to have done so.”

Fired at KU in 2011, after two unsuccessful seasons and a 5-19 record, Gill fared much better at Liberty, where his seventh season ended this past weekend. He retires with a 47-35 record at the private university in Lynchburg, Va., which transitioned from the FCS level to an FBS independent ahead of the 2018 season.

The Flames went 6-6 in Gill’s final year, giving him a 31-55 mark as a head coach at the FBS level, between his four seasons at Buffalo, two at KU and one at Liberty. Including his six FCS years at Liberty, his overall record stands at 72-84.

A Heisman Trophy finalist as a player at Nebraska, in 1983, Gill was a three-time All-Big Eight performer with the Cornhuskers.

Comments

Joe Ross 1 week, 1 day ago

Damn. He might have been a great assistant coach for Les Miles.

Seriously. Well wishes to his family. Has to be difficult stepping away, but kudos for keeping family first.

Sae Thirtysix 1 week, 1 day ago

Coach Gill, great human - very good college quarterback - failure as a Coach at Univ. of Kansas.

. . . story posted 6.10p CT, first cocktail for Joe Ross, 5.10p CT, seventh cocktail for Joe Ross, 7.25p CT, this post 7.28p CT.

Joe, remember it is important to hydrate as you polish off that handle of Titos.

Brent Shipley 1 week ago

Amazing college QB. Also took a job that nobody other than a HUGE name would of been able to succeed in. The team Mangino left was not the best or close to it.

Looking back wouldn't you guys of preferred to have 5 wins in two years instead of 6 in 4? Not saying either guy I want to coach but he never got a chance.

Matt Gauntt 1 week, 1 day ago

Most of us at KU don't have exceptionally fond memories of coach, but one thing you have to admit is that he was fundamentally a very good human being. Stepping away from something you love to be with an ailing spouse takes a very special man.

Kudos and all the best.

Brent Shipley 1 week ago

Lots of hate from so called fans. This guy never got a chance to build us with his players. Mangino didn't really leave the team in great shape. Hell Beaty got 4 years and only 6 wins but yet Gill got 2 and had 5 including an upset over Georgia Tech. Personally feel he should of got a third year to see but he didn't.

He was an amazing and special QB in college but that doesn't even compare because he is a hell of a human being. Hope the wife gets better Gill.

Chad Dexter 1 week ago

Gill didn't get any more years because he had epically bad teams. The defense, as I recall, was not just bad, but historically bad. Good on him for making the decision to be with his wife. Sounds like he is a good person. A terrible football coach but a good person.

Titus Canby 1 week ago

Gill was a good fit at Liberty and did a really good job there. Saw him speak at an alumni event going into his 2nd year at KU, and the guy can command a room.

Everything I've ever heard is that he's a terrific human being. Good luck Coach Gill.

Dane Pratt 1 week ago

He did well at Buffalo and Liberty. I don't think a fair assessment can be made about him from his two years at KU. A lot of good coaches could not turn KU into a winner in two seasons.

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