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Wednesday, August 8, 2018

NCAA makes rule change, allows basketball players to have agent

Kansas guard Andrew Wiggins flashes a wide smile after getting a bucket with seconds left to life the Jayhawks over Texas Tech 64-63 on Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2014 at United Spirit Arena in Lubbock, Texas. At right is Kansas forward Perry Ellis.

Kansas guard Andrew Wiggins flashes a wide smile after getting a bucket with seconds left to life the Jayhawks over Texas Tech 64-63 on Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2014 at United Spirit Arena in Lubbock, Texas. At right is Kansas forward Perry Ellis.

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The NCAA made a number of rule changes Wednesday that could have an impact on the Kansas men’s basketball team. The rule changes are effective immediately.

The NCAA will now allow "elite" high school and college players to be represented by an agent, while also allowing players to return to school if not selected in the NBA Draft. “Elite” players that go undrafted must notify their athletic director about returning to school by 5 p.m. Monday following the draft.

"Elite" high school prospects will be identified by USA Basketball. Those select players can be represented by an agent beginning July 1 before their senior year in high school, pending the end to the one-and-done rule.

In addition, there have also been changes to the current recruiting rules.

Student-athletes can now take up to 15 official visits, which begins Aug. 1 before their junior year. However, athletes can only officially visit a school once per year.

Coaches, meanwhile, can attend the NBPA Top 100 camp, high school events during the last two weeks of June and development camps (NCAA/USAB/NBPA) in late July. Coaches will only be allowed to attend one youth basketball event in early July.

— Check back in for more on the story at KUsports.com

Comments

Doug Stahler 4 months, 1 week ago

Is this article from the onion? Is it April? Wow those are big changes! I have that eerie feeling that something that sounds real good is actually real bad after a while.

Joe Ross 4 months, 1 week ago

RE: "Student-athletes can now take up to 15 official visits, which begins Aug. 1 before their junior year. However, athletes can only officially visit a school once per year.

Coaches, meanwhile, can attend the NBPA Top 100 camp, high school events during the last two weeks of June and development camps (NCAA/USAB/NBPA) in late July. Coaches will only be allowed to attend one youth basketball event in early July."

Okay, I'll admit to being lazy. But it would be nice if we were told how this is a change from prior to the new rules.

Craig Carson 4 months, 1 week ago

Ive never understood how the NCAA, a COLLEGE governing body, can control the actions of a HIGH SCHOOL student??!!!!..if a top kid wants to sign autographs or play in tournaments and make money prior to college, then they should be able to do that..also, HS should be allowed to deal with any agent they want and take whatever $$ they want..agents dont care what school these kids go to, they just want them as clients...when the kid officially signs his LOI, they should be able to accept $$..I do however think the shoe companies should be barred from all contact with these kids because shoe companies DO care where they go and they shouldnt be influencing where these kids commit to

Dale Rogers 4 months, 1 week ago

What they do is set the rules by which a student athlete is determined eligible or not eligible to play at an NCAA institution. That effectively controls the high school student, except, of course, in those "under the table" situations like those that precipitated these changes.

Craig Carson 4 months, 1 week ago

every other kid entering college is allowed to hold a job or make money off a talent they posses...it has always been stupid to exclude a kid from being able to do this just because they play for one of the schools athletic programs..not allowing these kids any flexability has caused all this corruption..the NCAA is never gonna pay these kids, the least they can do is let them make money before entering college..

Jeff Coffman 4 months, 1 week ago

It seems like you want a lot of rules in place...you can hire an agent, you can't make money in college, but you can in HS, you can work with agents, but you can't work with shoe companies. This is exactly what has gotten many of the governing bodies into trouble, they legislate a lot of rules that become too cumbersome to manage. To take your shoe example forward, how about headbands, shirts, cars, socks, etc.? I would venture to guess that most agents would steer players to universities that are on TV more, so they can build their brand. I'm surprised you would say that agents don't care which school a "kid" goes to. I'm pretty sure that an agent that has a recruit at a blue blood school is much happier than one that is not going to a Power 5 university.

Craig Carson 4 months, 1 week ago

not at all..it boils down to 3 basic rules 1) allow HS kids the flexability to make money prior to entering college 2)let HS kids deal with agents and accept $$ 3)prevent shoe companies from the recruiting process there are stipulations to these rules but those are the very basics. Maybe if some of these kids were allowed to make money prior to college they might not feel such a need to leave early

Jeff Coffman 4 months, 1 week ago

I'm not sure this affects too many players. It seems like this would affect 20-40 High School Athletes and college athletes that are sophomore and juniors who likely are on that 25-undrafted basketball players. Many of whom have historically not hired agents and might use this to better their interaction with NBA Scouts and Teams.

I wonder if hiring agents, if these players are on the hook for some fees and commissions even if they go undrafted and return to school. There could be some financial concerns for these players.

All in all probably a good removal of a rule, but I get nervous when you remove a rule and place 4 rules to govern it.

Craig Carson 4 months, 1 week ago

im all for kids being able to deal with agents prior to college..but I personally think once they are in college the agent thing should be off limits..simply because its already tough for a coach to coach their teams. is it really a good idea to allow their players to receive visits from agents during the season? I think it would be a distraction...

Andy Godwin 4 months, 1 week ago

I guess men’s college basketball is officially dropping the requirement for amateurism. You can’t believe that no monies will ever pass between family and agent and who is USA basketball to determine which player is elite? That ranking process surely will not be without ethical problems. It is time for the NBA to expand their minor leagues, allow talented kids to completely bypass the one year of “higher education” (wink, wink) and make a living with their natural skills. College athletics should focus on the student first and embrace the student-athletes who want an education while representing their school on a court or field. Men’s basketball will survive without the 20, 30 or so premiere high school basketball players each year ever gracing a campus of higher learning. The NBA has played the NCAA for years and used them for the sole purpose of evaluating talent and developing their skills without paying a dime. The only rule that needs to be made is for the NBA to allow the top players to make a living out of high school if able, whether in the NBA or their expanded minor leagues. Colleges should focus on what their faculty are paid to do and that is educate.

Shannon Gustafson 4 months, 1 week ago

NCAA didn't ask the NBA or USA basketball about this before making these new "rules" and since the NBA won't change their collective bargaining agreement until 2021 at the earliest, there is no way for the draft rule to take effect before then.

Since USA Basketball wasn't asked to help with selecting "elite" athletes and they've since indicated they aren't interested, that's another "rule" the NCAA made that can't happen as-written.

Basically, as expected, the NCAA gave a half-ass attempt at all of this, didn't collaborate with the organizations they said would help them, and only really did things that give the NCAA more control over everything (more investigative power, more power over high school tournaments, more power over those who aren't drafted, more power over coaches and AD's). It was just a power grab by the NCAA and nothing more. They don't care about reform, they care about the money, the power, and the NCAA.

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