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Wednesday, July 20, 2016

Grobe: Baylor’s ‘issues’ not unique

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— Interim Baylor football coach Jim Grobe admitted Tuesday at Big 12 Football Media Days the job ahead of him, with the program and university reeling this offseason in the aftermath of a sexual-assault scandal, will be daunting.

The former Wake Forest and Ohio head coach, however, didn’t agree with the notion the entire off-the-field culture in Waco, Texas, needed an overhaul — despite his predecessor Art Briles, losing his job due to former players’ involvement in cases of assault against women.

Instead, Grobe chose to highlight the remaining Bears as “fantastic kids” whom he hoped would learn from their former teammates’ mistakes.

“We talk so much about changing the culture. That’s not the deal with these players at Baylor. I think most people understand this,” Grobe responded during a morning news conference at the Omni Dallas Hotel. “The majority of our kids are great kids — I mean great kids. It’s a shame when a few guys can really hurt a large group of people in such a devastating way, really.”

While making clear the issues that plagued Baylor reached much further than players missing classes or showing up late for workouts, Grobe went on to suggest the matters in question for the university and football program probably are encountered “at every university in the country. I hate to say every one, but I’m guessing many universities are having some of the same issues we’ve had at Baylor.”

Much like the Bears, the new coach said BU’s leaders are learning from past mistakes. Still, Grobe also faced scrutiny at his first Big 12 media appearance for retaining some football assistants who worked on Briles’ staff.

“I felt like the best thing we could do for (the players),” Grobe countered, “is to try to keep consistency in the coaches, have the same coach in the meeting room, have the same terminology, and try to, you know, put our arms around the players and take care of them. I thought the best way to take care of them was to try to keep the coaching staff together as long as I didn’t find any problems when I got here.”

Comments

John Randall 11 months, 1 week ago

" put our arms around the players and take care of them. I thought the best way to take care of them was to try to keep the coaching staff together "

This sounds like an attempt to continue aiding and abetting criminal conduct ... akin to 'fixing' traffic tickets until someone gets killed by escalating violations that could have been prevented by enforcing penalties in place.

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