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Thursday, February 12, 2015

KU assistant coach Jerrance Howard to serve 2-week suspension

Kansas forward Tarik Black is helped off the court by assistant coach Jerrance Howard, right, and trainer Bill Cowgill after sustaining an injury during the second half on Monday, Jan. 20, 2014 at Allen Fieldhouse.

Kansas forward Tarik Black is helped off the court by assistant coach Jerrance Howard, right, and trainer Bill Cowgill after sustaining an injury during the second half on Monday, Jan. 20, 2014 at Allen Fieldhouse.

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Kansas University men’s basketball assistant coach Jerrance Howard will serve a two-week suspension from all team activities as punishment for a July 2014 arrest for possession of marajuana, KU coach Bill Self announced Thursday afternoon. The suspension is effective immediately.

“I take full responsibility for my actions,” Howard said in a press release. “I should have never been in that situation. Not only did I let myself down, but also my family, my coaches, my players, the fans and this program. Coach Self has done so much for me and I’m honored to a part of this team and this staff. I compounded the problem by not disclosing this incident to Coach Self and Kansas Athletics. I brought this penalty upon myself and will use this situation as motivation to work harder and represent this great program positively moving forward.”

KU coach Bill Self, who voiced his disappointment over Howard's actions during his regular meeting with the media Thursday afternoon, said not knowing about Howard's run-in with the law long ago bothered him the most.

“Regardless of circumstances, I was disappointed that I was not made aware of this immediately following the incident,” Self said in the release. “Jerrance has been a part of our family for many years. I’m confident that he will take ownership of this and be better for it.”

A Wednesday report from Kirk Wessler, of the Peoria Journal-Star, indicated that Howard, a Peoria, Illinois, native, pleaded guilty to misdemeanor drug possession in Illinois' Peoria County last summer.

According to the report, Howard, 34, was arrested in July 2014 for unlawful possession of cannabis and ordered to pay nearly $1,200 in fines and court fees and placed on six months of court supervision, which ends Friday.

Howard played at Illinois from 2001-04, including three seasons for Self, before joining the coaching profession. Prior to his joining the staff at Kansas before the 2013-14 season, Howard was an assistant coach at SMU (2012-13) and Illinois (2008-12). He also worked for the basketball staffs at Kentucky (2006-08) and Texas A&M; (2005-06).

Comments

Don Burgundy 6 years, 8 months ago

I can't speak for the rest of the KU fans, but I'm behind you 100% Coach Howard. You live and you learn. Rock Chalk..

Jay Willis 6 years, 8 months ago

Couldn't agree more. FOE. Mess up again you're done. Demonstrate that you understand the honor and tradition commanded by the members of the KU family. From this point forward own this opportunity to add to the KU legacy by being living proof that FOE exsists in actions and choices and ownership of shortcomings. If it was my child deciding between KU and whoever, this is what I would both want to hear and have evidence of. ACJH can provide that.

Jay Scott 6 years, 8 months ago

Get off the dope. Howard didn't come clean about the arrest. He's done. Jacques Vaughn will replace him.

Walter Bridges 6 years, 8 months ago

I wonder what would have happened if a player had done the same and kept quiet over the incident?

I'm not sure this is the message we should be sending.

Aaron Paisley 6 years, 8 months ago

Appropriate for now, don't be shocked if Howard also "voluntarily" takes another position in the offseason. You obviously can't replace someone midseason, but I also don't see this helping KU to keep him long term either. Howard does deserve a second chance, which is why I think Self will let him leave on his own instead of firing him, but that second chance will not be with KU.

Suzi Marshall 6 years, 8 months ago

We'll see. There are probably numerous variable we don't know anything about. Self has more than earned our trust and support for this decision.

Janet Olin 6 years, 8 months ago

Some punishment had to come down immediately for not telling Coach Self and the breach of trust. I wouldn't have a problem with him being fired/replaced after the season is over, but I think to do that now would create a circus of distractions the team cannot afford, and would let recruits decide what to do. This is probably a fair start to the process.

Walter Bridges 6 years, 8 months ago

I hardly think his dismissal would create a circus anymore than there already is plus we don't have 'recruits'.

Carlton Bragg stated that he made his decision based on his visit during Late-Night.

Dale Rogers 6 years, 8 months ago

I see this as treating him the same as if he were a player on the team. Behind the scenes scolding and discussion and having the law laid down, then the suspension. Then he returns to life as normal. So long as there is not a second incident, this one becomes simply history that is not to repeated. I do not think his job is in any kind of jeopardy over this other than two strikes and you're out. A lot probably depends on how the players react to him going forward. I can't imagine they wouldn't support him. They understand everyone makes mistakes and deserves a second chance. Personally, I think the suspension, treating him the same as a player or anyone else, is exactly correct, as is giving him the second chance.

Jay Willis 6 years, 8 months ago

Maybe not anymore, but when I was at KU from 98-02 it was pretty well known and out in the open that the majority of players smoked. I know different coach and all that, but I doubt KU is the one place now where athletes use and acceptance of MJ is not the unspoken norm.

RJ King 6 years, 8 months ago

But it's NOT the same as if he were a player on the team.

Players are players, and coaches are coaches. Completely different situations.

Players are 18-22 year olds. Coaches are usually in their 30'-60's.

Players practice, train and play. Coaches teach, advise and mentor.

Players may help sell our program to other players. Coaches sell our program to players AND their parents.

Sherron continued to play, but Larry Eustachy left Iowa State.

Brady played again, but Bob Huggins was let go by Cincy.

Similar infractions, different situations. Players, not coaches.

Suzi Marshall 6 years, 8 months ago

I can imagine how PO'ed Self is about Howard holding out this information. Nevertheless, if Howard otherwise maintained an admirable record, I'm proud of Self for standing by his man. The easy way out for Self would be to take the sanctimonious, holier than thou, route and fire the guy.

Severeno Woods 6 years, 8 months ago

I support coach Howard 100%. Just should have spoke up sooner to coach Self about this situation.

Joe Joseph 6 years, 8 months ago

Fitting. Story over. Let's all move on.

Steve Jacob 6 years, 8 months ago

So the NCAA banned Mitch McGrady (Michigan) a YEAR for a failed drug test and he gets two weeks.

Cody Riedy 6 years, 8 months ago

I didn't think Howard had to be fired, but this does seem a little light compared to how I'd assume a player would be treated in the same situation.

Dale Rogers 6 years, 8 months ago

We're not talking cocaine, heroin, or other hard drugs. We're talking a misdemeanor, which essentially amounts to running a stop sign but without the risk of hitting another car and hurting someone. Let's don't overblow this. It deserves the attention and the suspension but unless there is another incident this one should now be in the rear view mirror.

Jay Scott 6 years, 8 months ago

Running a stop sign isn't a misdemeanor. Stop with all this "pot is cool" stuff. It's illegal.

RJ King 6 years, 8 months ago

This has nothing to do with how a player would be treated in the same situation.

Players are 18-22. Coaches are 30's-60's.

Players study, practice, train and play. Coaches teach, advise and mentor.

Players help sell our program to other players. Coaches sell our program to players AND their parents.

That's why Sherron continued to play, but Larry Eustachy left Iowa State.

Brady played again, but Bob Huggins was let go by Cincy.

Similar infractions, different situations.

The job descriptions for a student athlete and college coach are completely different. It isn't a one-size-fits-all solution.

Tom Jones 6 years, 8 months ago

If McGary's test hadn't been during the tournament, he would have received a similar, probably lighter suspension.

The NCAA takes over during tourney time and they have some stupid, draconian rules as we all know.

Joe Ross 6 years, 8 months ago

The medicine may have been swallowed, but it leaves a bad taste in the mouth.

Trace Stark 6 years, 8 months ago

Seems like an appropriate penalty... best of luck to coach Howard in the future...

Micky Baker 6 years, 8 months ago

I let this sort of simmer for a little while. On one hand, I get that people make mistakes, but if he had marijuana in his possession, what's going to stop him from still doing it and possibly performing his work duties while under the influence just because he doesn't possess it outside his home? It doesn't matter what you believe about marijuana, I'm pretty sure that the University wouldn't let a professor off with just a 2 week suspension. The minds of impressionable youth are relevant here. I would make sure that he agrees to a drug test weekly from here on out at any time during the week unannounced for 6 months or so. If he fails it once, he's terminated. I'm surprised it was just a 2 week suspension.

He knew and didn't tell Bill Self or anyone in the athletic department. At least let someone know. It's a public record. Someone is going to find about it some time.

Dale Rogers 6 years, 8 months ago

Brady Morningstar was arrested for driving drunk on the turnpike between KC and Lawrence. In that role he was endangering every other driver in the area as well as himself. He served a one semester suspension, then resumed play without further incidents. This two-week suspension seems very appropriate for the infraction involved, to me. No doubt the leash is short for a long time, as it should be. Think about it. If you are arrested for that same offense, should you be fired from your job? Kicked out of school?

John Boyle 6 years, 8 months ago

I would be fired from my job and rightfully so. I am in a trusted position that has to be able to make wise and correct decisions.

Micky Baker 6 years, 8 months ago

Being arrested for and being convicted of are two different things.

Walter Bridges 6 years, 8 months ago

Did Brady keep the information (not sure he could have even if he wanted to) to himself without informing the school for over a year?

Brady is a player, a coach should be held to a higher standard. And yes, if I had been arrested for possession of marijuana, I most definitely would have been fired and would have had a General Discharge following me the rest of my life.

And for the record, I support marijuana legalization but it needs to be done by the federal government.

Micky Baker 6 years, 8 months ago

I believe we knew about Brady's arrest within a couple of days, if not the very next day.

Dave Miller 6 years, 8 months ago

I can't help but wonder if the NCAA has anything to say about the situation. Do they have any authority in the matter at all? Do they let this type of situation be handled by the University and/or the Head Coach? Are they officially notified in some manner for review or possible further action or recommendation? I'm just curious is all. Does someone here know for sure?

Jim Pendleton 6 years, 8 months ago

Someone with knowledge on Mitch McGary's suspension can add more than me, but he had to have had another incident prior to that to get a year suspension. Also what was the failed drug test for? If it was for more than marijuana, or a repeat offense, that could be why.

This is a difficult situation for everyone right now. If he had disclosed this when it occured, he probably gets a game or two early in the season at most. It's a little more now since he didn't disclose it. I could make the argument for another game, or thru the end of the regular season, but this at least gets his attention to realize how big a mistake this was. I agree that long term this could go either way, but this will be a big negative for someone else to consider him. Hopefully he makes the most of this second chance, whether that be here or elsewhere.

I am probably in the minority of people who think marijuana or anything else is a bad deal. If I had played college ball and did something like this, I would have worried as to what my coach would have done to me, but I know my parents wrath would have been far worse. I realize this day and age things are different, but as long as the laws are what they are, everyone involved with any KU program (frankly any team for that matter) has to be held to a higher standard, players, coaches, and other staff included. It's tough as to where you draw the line (depends on seriousness of the offense), but I am for giving those who mess up a second chance. Anything beyond that & you are likely gone.

I appreciate everyone's opinions on this. We all won't agree on the issue, or the punishment most likely. Let's just hope it gets everyone's attention, and that we can concern ourselves with on the court deals. There are big games ahead! Rock Chalk!!

Aaron Paisley 6 years, 8 months ago

I don't believe McGary's suspension was the result of his first failed test. I believe that was his second or third failed test while at Michigan.

Tom Jones 6 years, 8 months ago

It was actually his only failed test, and it was only for mary jane.

The NCAA has some really dumb rules. It would have been similar to Howard's suspension, maybe even less, if it hadn't occurred during the tournament.

Micky Baker 6 years, 8 months ago

So, if it would have been for open container of alcohol or something like that that is illegal, would it be different? No.

Joe Ross 6 years, 8 months ago

I dont understand your position, Kevin. Its 2015, and pot is illegal in Illinois. You can argue whether or not it should be, but that is not the reality right now. Jerrance knew this. Besides, legal or not its against the conditions of his employment. So questions of legality aside, why should this be overlooked?

Jeff Kilgore 6 years, 8 months ago

If I may, Joe. Usually I agree with your positions. Pot is an anachronistic misbehavior. The year 2015 really is an issue. We are on the verge of national legality of marijuana, something that will pass in the next decade if not sooner. I neither condone nor condemn its use, personally, but the times, they are achangin' and I believe that it took more courage for Self to make the decision he made than to dismiss Jerrance. I might be wrong, but this is how I feel.

Joe Ross 6 years, 8 months ago

By all means, Jeff. Feel free to disagree and express your opinion. We can disagree respectfully. Times are changing but even if mj was decriminalized tomorrow two things would certainly be the case: 1. Jerrance Howard would still be guilty of breaking the law, and 2. He broke contractual agreements with The University. Times may be changing, but his guilt is established on the basis of what the law was at the time of the offense; not whether or not decriminalization is on the horizon.

Jay Scott 6 years, 8 months ago

Neither party is interested in legalizing pot nationally. You've been smoking too much of it if you believe that.

Micky Baker 6 years, 8 months ago

I think each state should decide and federal laws regarding it should be eliminated. But if it is illegal in one state, then someone who brings it from another would be bound by the state where it is illegal. It may turn out that eventually every state would make it legal, but I just don't see that happening any time soon. Bigger fish to fry.

Yolanda Gay 6 years, 8 months ago

Self has to get rid of him. He's lost all credibility as a recruiter! Plus I don't care if people think it should be legal, the fact right now is it's not! And finally, he didn't tell Self about it.

Bryce Landon 6 years, 8 months ago

The KSU and Mizzou trolls are the ones looking to use them.

Bryce Landon 6 years, 8 months ago

Completely agree. Two weeks is too light of a punishment considering his position of authority and influence over young men. Also, what kind of message does that send to the players to slap him on the wrist like that?

Joe Ross 6 years, 8 months ago

I searched high and low for any evidence that Carlton Bragg's commitment was waivering. Couldn't find any. Do you have a source?

Walter Bridges 6 years, 8 months ago

I don't believe your comment that "Norm Roberts is already on the road trying to ensure that Bragg is still committed" to be truthful.

Why contribute false information into this discussion?

Alex Thiessen 6 years, 8 months ago

Things have changed recently and I don't think this is as big a deal as it would have been 10 years ago. And since everyone knows that basketball players love to smoke herb, this may actually help recruiting. But yes he should have told Self Immediately. No way of hiding this stuff. In another 10 years this is just gonna seem silly.

Larry Jackson 6 years, 8 months ago

His credibility as a recruiter really has not been as damaged as many of you want to portray. I hate to pull the "race card"... But generally speaking mj has been a part of Black communities long before White society outlawed it based on racist motivations. Most minorities get that, honestly. Who is he recruiting? I will agree not telling your boss of a misdemeanor is a 2 game suspension, possibly.

Micky Baker 6 years, 8 months ago

Marijuana was made illegal because of race? Maybe Crack Cocaine, but not marijuana.

Micky Baker 6 years, 8 months ago

Unfortunately, I believe you're race baiting.

Eliott Reeder 6 years, 8 months ago

Yes, the "reefer madness" that led to the illegalization of marijuana was very much influenced by race in America. Know your history, Micky, before you jump to conclusions about a subject you are not fully informed of.

Joe Ross 6 years, 8 months ago

Whether mj is used to "entrap" blacks more than whites or not, African Americans have nothing to fear of it if we choose to abide by the law. While Im not excusing judicial inequity, it is disingenuous to speak of it while not addressing individuals' willful participation in criminal activity.

Cody Riedy 6 years, 8 months ago

Stats show that blacks do not use drugs more frequently than whites, and i'm talking by percentage to account for population difference. But the stats on how much more frequently minorities are stopped, searched, arrested, charged, the severity of the charge, the likelihood of conviction, harshness of sentence, etc, are extremely disproportionally impacting minorities more than whites. Effectively there's one set of laws for whites and one set of laws for minorities. This is not a political interpretation; these are well documented facts. Considering how much drug use is going on right now among probably thousands of middle class white kids on the campus of KU, white kids whom will probably never have a cop stop them and frisk walking home from a house party, or stop and search their car because they are driving home late, or raid their house party where half of them are drinking underage, smoking marijuana, passing around prescription drugs, etc, I find it so unfair, unrealistic, and really beside the point, to say, well black people shouldn't smoke pot if they don't want to be treated like criminals. The point is, effectively the justice system assumes they are criminals before the fact and then finds a reason to arrest them. If young white people were treated the same way, marijuana would be legalized before the end of the week. Again, this isn't political race-baiting; these are well established facts. And to be clear, this doesn't mean that white people in the judicial system are all saying to themselves, "let's go arrest some young black men today," that's not how institutionalized racism works, it doesn't require people to be actively consciously racist, to produce racist results. I know, I know, this isn't the place for this - I just get a bit irked when the "personal responsibility" truism gets tossed out as an answer to large historical, social, systemic forces.

Micky Baker 6 years, 8 months ago

What you're stating isn't true either. The cops go where the crimes are committed the most. They didn't just seek out Howard because he was black, nor did they just seek out Brady Morningstar who isn't black.

Let's keep in mind that if there are systemic reasons for one race to be disproportionately affected may not be an accident by those who say, promised, and even try to champion the effort to help them. Because unemployment issues also disproportionately affect blacks, and in particular black teens. The murder rate among blacks is disproportionately high as well. I don't believe that it is a flaw of the race, but a result of the inherent flaws of political ambitions that go unchecked in certain geographic locations. Everyone is an individual, and where the largest amount of crime is is where the largest police presence is going to be. How about empowering minorities to rise out of the circumstance 50 years after we ended segregation for the purpose of empowering them, black people in particular. The only difference between me and them is the color of our skin. They have ambitions and dreams too. They want to make things better for their children, just like you and me do. So, let's liberate them from those systemic forces, and that won't include making marijuana legal, by the way.

Joe Ross 6 years, 8 months ago

@Cody, while I certainly agree that statistics bear out the inequity in the justice system, it behooves those disadvantaged to not throw themselves at the mercy of an inequitable system by being involved in crime. If they commit no crime, then the judicial system holds no fear for them (this is true for >99+% of all cases). You do have situations, of course, where profiling occurs. But when profiling happens in the absence of a crime being committed the statistics are low on cases ever going to trial (meaning there is no inequitable conviction). It's when crimes are ACTUALLY BEING COMMITTED that one must concern himself with the inequity of the system. In saying this I want to be clear that I do not support the judicial system as it is, but I hope you see this as a two-part problem that is going to require a two-part solution. Fixing the judicial system doesn't stop the crime.

Micky Baker 6 years, 8 months ago

I wholeheartedly agree with your position for the most part. What will stop the crime is allowing individuals, regardless of their race, to improve their own economic condition without completely pulling the rug out from underneath them when they get the point that they're almost out. It does not matter what the intentions of the government are, help them with a hand up which means helping them until their walking on their own two feet, as a figure of speech of course. I believe the problem is systemic only because the federal government uses a national average rather than considering the conditions in various locations. For example, it would be a safe assumption that Gary, Indiana does not have the exact same economic conditions as what it exists in Washington, DC. Though, the two places have among the highest poverty rates in the country, the costs associated with solving the problem in the two places is not the same. The poverty level is understated in all of the lower 48 states, but the magnitude of the understatement varies widely from Washington, DC to Gary, IN. It doesn't cost as much to help those in Gary as it does in DC, thus it can in no way be equitable with a one sized solution offered by the federal government. It's easier for them to do it the way it is, but it's worth the extra effort to do it better but will they or can the federal government address this issue on its own? I don't think it can. So, the local government in Washington, DC needs to step up and create its own funding to address it there. Then it needs to be replicated at the local level across the country. It's not easy, but it's worth it if it is done that way. Then the types of jobs and industry in each place can be involved for positive change rather than trying to go by the dictates of a federal bureaucrat that goes by an average among markets that can vary from the media by as much as 100% or more in one direction.

Micky Baker 6 years, 8 months ago

I wholeheartedly agree with your position for the most part. What will stop the crime is allowing individuals, regardless of their race, to improve their own economic condition without completely pulling the rug out from underneath them when they get to the point that they're almost out of the former condition. It does not matter what the intentions of the government are, help them with a hand up which means helping them until their walking on their own two feet, as a figure of speech of course. I believe the problem is systemic partly because the federal government uses a national average rather than considering the conditions in various locations. For example, it would be a safe assumption that Gary, Indiana does not have the exact same economic conditions as what it exists in Washington, DC. Though, the two places have among the highest poverty rates in the country, the costs associated with solving the problem in the two places are not the same. The poverty level is understated in all of the lower 48 states, but the magnitude of the understatement varies widely from Washington, DC to Gary, IN. It doesn't cost as much to help those in Gary as it does in DC, thus it can in no way be equitable with a one sized solution offered by the federal government. It's easier for them to do it the way it is, but it's worth the extra effort to do it better but will they or can the federal government address this issue on its own? I don't think it can. So, the local government in Washington, DC needs to step up and create its own funding to address it there. Then it needs to be replicated at the local level across the country. It's not easy, but it's worth it if it is done that way. Then the types of jobs and industry in each place can be involved for positive change rather than trying to go by the dictates of a federal bureaucrat that goes by an average among markets that can vary from the median by as much as 100% or more in one direction.

Aaron Paisley 6 years, 8 months ago

Black people are to blame for marijuana being made illegal in the same way Christians were to blame for Rome burning under Nero. Both groups were simply the scapegoats. Hemp was a regularly grown crop throughout American history because of all of its uses in everyday life. William Randolph Hearst was heavily invested in timber, hemp paper had the potential to cost him a lot of money, so he ran a smear campaign against marijuana. He scapegoated the jazz culture as being sex crazed, murdering maniacs and fear mongered people into believing that stuff. Reefer Madness was part of this campaign which worked so well that marijuana is still illegal in most parts of the country. Race had nothing to do with the root cause of marijuana being criminalized, corporate greed is why marijuana is illegal today.

Micky Baker 6 years, 8 months ago

So, it wasn't because people chose to do it and got caught?

Jay Reynolds 6 years, 8 months ago

I'll bet that some recruits' families also will appreciate Self's handling of the entire issue in a reasonable way rather than succumbing to the knee jerk hysteria over pot by a few hand-wringing fans.

Micky Baker 6 years, 8 months ago

"I'll bet that some recruits' families also will appreciate Self's handling of the entire issue in a reasonable way rather than succumbing to the knee jerk hysteria over pot by a few hand-wringing fans."

Because you have a point due to the fact that everyone posting here is posting after the fact, and none of the comments here had an effect his decision in any way and occurred after he made the decision? You told me to stop drinking? LOL

Bryce Landon 6 years, 8 months ago

That is the most ignorant comment I've seen on ANY message board so far in 2015, and the year is still young. If you hate to play the race card, then don't play the damn race card! What a tool.

Aaron Paisley 6 years, 8 months ago

His credibility has been hurt and you don't even realize why because you're so focused on the marijuana aspect and playing the race card to see why Howard's recruiting credibility is shot at KU. Jerrance Howard LIED TO HIS BOSS ABOUT AN ARREST AND CONVICTION. That's the issue at hand and you just completely missed the point. Other coaches are going to exploit this by telling recruits that Howard had no problems lying to his boss so he has no problem lying to you. This is why Howard needs to go after the season because it will negatively impact recruiting.

Walter Bridges 6 years, 8 months ago

If you're going to use the Race Card, the truth is a little more complex.

California apparently passed the first state marijuana law, outlawing “preparations of hemp, or loco weed.” These laws were aimed both at the Mexican population and surprisingly Mormons who had traveled to Mexico and brought it with them to Salt Lake City.

Other states quickly followed suit with marijuana prohibition laws, including Wyoming (1915), Texas (1919), Iowa (1923), Nevada (1923), Oregon (1923), Washington (1923), Arkansas (1923), and Nebraska (1927). These laws tended to be specifically targeted against the Mexican-American population.

Later laws in Eastern states were mostly brought about through black usage which started in the music scene and one newspaper editorial claimed “Marihuana influences Negroes to look at white people in the eye, step on white men’s shadows and look at a white woman twice.”.

For a drug whose usage predates human history do we really need to break it down into another discussion about race?

Michael Leiker 6 years, 8 months ago

I agree, can't have high level university representatives doing drugs, doesn't matter what the drug is, it's illegal. He should have been dismissed immediately.

David Kelley-Wood 6 years, 8 months ago

How is it that this is surfacing now? His probation ends on Friday, at which time he will have 'paid his debt to society.'

A lot is being made of the fact that he didn't alert Coach right off the bat, as he rightly should have. But, he was probably hoping (praying) that this could all be handled within the Illinois jurisdiction, kept quiet, not reflect on KU, and ultimately get expunged (likely within 12-24 months), and go away. Not saying that was the most mature way to deal with it, but I imagine that's the way his mind was working. It could have been a twisted sense of loyalty to Coach that he allowed to cloud his judgment. As he said, putting himself in that position in the first place was the beginning of his troubles.

I guess it isn't relevant, but I can't help wondering how he managed to get caught, and how much he had on him at the time. A joint? Nobody can be so naïve as to think he's the only pot smoker in the business. I guess you've got to figure he must have been pretty indiscreet. Anyway, good luck to Jerrance going forward.

Phil Leister 6 years, 8 months ago

The Illinois law..."between 2.5 and ten grams of any substance that contains cannabis is a Class B misdemeanor and is punishable by a period of incarceration of up to six months and a fine of up to $1,500"

That amounts to between one and a few joints.

Joe Ross 6 years, 8 months ago

Youre right. It wasnt the most mature way to deal with it. But this understates the obvious. Howard placed himself above the program, as you recognize yourself. This is not the kind of behavior you want or expect from an assistant coach at the premier program in college basketball. Legalities aside, Howard's stupidity and selfishness could potentially have hurt himself and Kansas beyond what appears to be coming down the pike discipline-wise; but the point is that he KNEW that when he committed the offense.

Micky Baker 6 years, 8 months ago

Hey, it doesn't matter if marijuana is legal or not. You can't drink and drive,even though alcohol is legal. You can't have an open container in your vehicle.

I need to look at more about this issue with Howard. If it was discovered in a traffic stop, he could have been written a DUI as well. It's not just for alcohol.

In normal circumstances I would just write this off, if he just did it at home. However, he is in a position of leadership over players that have to abide by rules that include not smoking, anything. This is an egregious violation of ethics amplified by the fact that he didn't tell anyone when it happened. If it was a player simply suspected of driving under the influence just because they refused a field sobriety test, it would have been known right away by everyone in Lawrence, and I doubt it would be just two weeks but maybe an entire semester for a player or dismissal.

I'm thinking that Howard's gotta go for the integrity of our program.

We can ask another former player living the area to fill in for him. Wayne Simien? Jacque Vaughn has some spare time and coaching experience. There are others that can fill in for the rest of this season. I just don't see how a suspension can allow Self to enforce team rules against the players regarding marijuana that are stricter than what was done here.

Jay Reynolds 6 years, 8 months ago

Check into it, Micky. If you can't just write it off, let us know how you propose to deal with it above and beyond what the actual legal system did. And stop posting while you're drinking. LOL

Joe Ross 6 years, 8 months ago

You seem to be satisfied that penance under law has been served, as am I; yet there are other issues here. Suppose the legal system had sent him to prison. I wonder then if you would have been equally well satisfied. If so, then you are clearly unbiased. If not, it would seem obvious that you support the law to the extent that it is congruent with your perspective. The second point is that how The University chooses to deal with it is another issue. Legal issues off the table, Howard acted in reckless ways that stood to potential hurt the University which employs him. Third, as above, KU has deemed a 2-week suspension appropriate and as fans we must accept this. Had they fired him the same would have been true, even in the face of protests by those who now feel "hand wringing" over staff members' illegal activity is an unwarranted knee-jerk reaction. Fourth, the fact that there is any discipline at all is a reflection and acknowledgment of the fact that Howard is not in the moral clear, and he's said as much himself.

Jay Reynolds 6 years, 8 months ago

Yes, I am satisfied.

You're making a lot of points, but why entertain hypotheticals? The actual legal system (not the Williams Fund lynch mob) has spoken. He broke the law and was penalized as the courts saw fit. As of tomorrow, he is a free man. 1) Was he sent to prison? Um, no. 2) Does the University legally have any grounds to dismiss him based on a misdemeanor? ? ? ? Apparently not. 3) Protest or support the suspension all you want--your 'opinion' about it doesn't mean squat. 4) Howard pleaded guilty to breaking the law, but whether he's in the "moral clear" is not for you or me to decide. Maybe you know him better than Bill Self does.

All you folks still upset about this should gently hug your 1950's reefer madness pamphlet and try to get some sleep.

Joe Ross 6 years, 8 months ago

Lots of very good reasons to entertain hypotheticals. It helps to flesh out whether your opinion is based on what you feel about Howard vs. what you feel about the use of drugs. It allows us to foresee into the future what the consequences MIGHT be when a range of disciplinary measures may be available based on this particular outcome. When entertaining possibilities it gives one a sense of what may be playing in the minds of people relevant to the discussion, including for example recruits, and thereby give you some intuition for the factors that go into making the decision about Howard's future. On and on. Lots of reasons...

In answer to some of your points, no one is arguing that he should be sent to prison. Least of all me. Yet there is a purpose in drawing the hypothetical that you are averse to. See the comment again if necessary. 2. The University can dismiss coaches--even HEAD coaches--for offenses that don't even rise to the level of criminal misconduct. Mark Mangino? 3. You seem to find some delight in proudly boasting that my opinion which is contrary to yours doesn't mean anything. It's fair to point out that no one's opinion outside of Coach Self's, the Athletic Department's, and possibly the NCAA's has no bearing on Howard's consequence. This includes me, those who feel as I do, those who feel as you do...and you yourself. Your last point can actually be teased apart further. Simply because morality does not equate with law does not mean it is not for members of a society to decide what is moral and what is not. Why? Because while not everything which is immoral should be illegal, certainly the immorality of some offenses are the basis for their being so. While I dont think that drugs should be illegal, and Im offended at the fact that Mr. Howard's individual liberty is abridged with mundane laws, this is a different thing than saying I have no say or interest in the morality of decisions made in the society in which I live. For that matter, you do as well. But there is nothing whatsoever prohibitive of my having an opinion as to whether or not its a moral thing for an individual to enter into an agreement with an institution whereby he guarantees to abide by certain behavior, and then behave in ways contrary to his agreement and thereby bring potential harm. To say that I am not involved personally is not the same as saying I can not make a moral decision about the question, yet judging by your post these ideas are conflated. Finally, you err in the assumption that I object on the basis of the use of marijuana (I think it is dumb, but should be Constitutionally protected). I refer you to the comments I made some moments ago.

Micky Baker 6 years, 8 months ago

So, that's what it is. You think I'm part of the Williams Fund donors? Try being rational.

Why is it personal with you? Jerrance Howard has influence on these men, and even if I thought marijuana should be legal, I don't think it's moral to violate the clauses of a contract or to engage in its use when you're in a position of leadership over people who are, by the rules of the program, prohibited from using the substance rather it be legal or not.

I do care about the integrity of our program and if you think this is just a news story in Lawrence, think again. It's all over the national sports pages. All the recruits are seeing this. How this is handled matters for the credibility of the program. If he hadn't plead guilty to it and there was a pending trial, then I don't think at that point we can make any judgements about this.

In terms of legalization of marijuana, i'd be okay with that as long as there were parts of that law that punished people for driving while under the influence of it and other things were done to prevent people from using it as an excuse to say they're disabled. I feel the same way about people who receive public assistance who pull out the ebt card to pay for some food, then pull out a 100 dollar bill to pay for beer, whiskey, and cigarettes. But these things are irrelevant to the issue at hand.

Micky Baker 6 years, 8 months ago

What Jay? I don't drink man. You do realize your post is a violation of TOS right?

Tom Jones 6 years, 8 months ago

I suppose it would be along the lines of: "lighten up".

Micky Baker 6 years, 8 months ago

Oh, okay. Because it's okay for someone you agree with to do it. Spare me the fake outrage.

Everyone knows what FFS means, and it isn't stated without malice.

Tom Jones 6 years, 8 months ago

Actually, it is, Micky. It's unfortunate that you are apparently adding malice.

It was said (and is usually said) with exasperation or bewilderment...rarely with outrage.

Hope this helps.

Tom Jones 6 years, 8 months ago

You mean like whining about a joke being a "violation of the TOS"?

Jerry Walker 6 years, 8 months ago

Yours?

Offended by FFS...That's really weak chili.

Micky Baker 6 years, 8 months ago

Check into it, Micky. If you can't just write it off, let us know how you propose to deal with it above and beyond what the actual legal system did. And stop posting while you're drinking. LOL

That isn't what I wrote up there. "Stop posting while you're drinking". That was a personal attack, and yes it is a violation of TOS. Stop biting my ankles. If you don't care, why do you care so much to respond?

Now you see why he shouldn't have said "FFS" to me, but to the guy that said "And stop posting while you're drinking". You see how because he agrees with another person that it didn't bother him and he joined the mob? Not that I really care, because neither of you have the ability to offend me. It's just said that we have fans that behave in this manner because they have a political agenda, one that I did not bring here, but they did. They sure as hell didn't get the treatment I got when I made a comment about Obama, did they? I didn't say anything about any other poster, then I came back later that day and some people were offended. I didn't see you saying anything that day. Why not? I have a good idea what the answer is. No courage.

Bryce Landon 6 years, 8 months ago

Jacque Vaughn as an assistant coach? I'm on that bandwagon!

Margaret Schadler 6 years, 8 months ago

There is another element here for consideration: marijuana use, legality aside, is well known to reduce motivation. And pot today is no longer the mild stuff of the 60's, but serious chemistry and plant biology has been applied to its effects. I agree Self will be looking hard and thinking harder over the next few months.

Jay Willis 6 years, 8 months ago

JH's biography includes the following: Three year basketball point guard for HCBS in the BigTen. It goes on to mention that he was elected as a team captain one of those years. Then all the coaching and recruiting jobs in which he cut his teeth. His success in both domains correlated to rapid ascension into his current role in which he was hand picked by his old coach to accompany him on this stop of his HOF career. While he's been in Lawrence his reputation as a big time recruiter has not only been corroborated but grown. I don't think motivation or lack there of is anything we need to be concerned about. Nor should we think that there is a single thing anyone of us could think of as a short and long term risk in this scenario that HCBS himself - a man with a much closer and longer relationship with ACJH - hasn't considered.

I'm not sure what upsets me more. The fact that ACJH risked so much and put others in such difficult positions, and then exacerbated it by not being forthcoming. Or the fact that so many of the posters on here - many of whom I admire for their knowledge, intelligence, wit and passion - have seemingly forgot the FOE motto that is a celebrated staple and compelling feature of HCBS teams.

Also there is a greater context to the timing of and choice to release this info.

http://bradleyfans.com/vb/showthread.php?t=24921

Everyone that fears that this could undermine our recruiting is completely missing the potential opportunity this gives us to enhance our recruiting. ACJH can now sit and look a parent and player in the eyes and say that he knows HCBS as both a coach and colleague for 13+ yrs. He is living testament that FOE is more then a saying, it is a way of accountability and commitment to growth.

Walter Bridges 6 years, 8 months ago

FOE goes both ways and I don't believe it to be applicable in this situation. As a coach, he falls under a different level when it comes to accountability to team policy and personal accountability.

Jay Willis 6 years, 8 months ago

Couldnt agree more in part, hence the immense dissapointment in ACJH's choice of actions. From posession/use to intentional withholding of arrest and conviction, ACJH made the wrong choice each and everytime in this one particular set of circumstances. His standard is different then the players due to age and experience, roles/responsibilities, etc. This is indisputable.

That being said, HCBS's first ever interactions with ACJH were of the coach/player variety. Their relationship has evolved over 13+ years. in this case I would argue that FOE is applicable and demonstrative of a permanent and consistent way of life. It acknwledges that a 13+ year relationship will play into the appropriate and measured response to a bad choice(s) made by a member of the family in which the other members of the family are harmed. The response will be equal in severity to the extent that your actions have harmed the other members of the internal family. The response will begin with a new choice to ammend your wrongs by accepting ownership and planning a series of means to correct the harms. It will also include a choice to acknowledge that there will be no more bad choices of this nature, if they do occur it means you will be asked to leave. But it is not, as so many others have pointed out, a knee jerk reaction and response to the dissapointment expressed by others who are also part of the family (i.e. fans) but outside of the immediate family and it's day to day functioning.

Again, if I were a potential recruit or parent of recruit, I would want verbal AND visual confirmation that FOE transcends individual roles and is as true 13yrs from now as it is this moment that you/your child commit choose to be part of the immediate family. In a day and age where athletes are huge revenue generators for others, it just would be refreshing to hear that the promises of guidence and growth athletically, academically, and personally do exsist as more than words but a commitment to the permanent well being of each member indefinitely, not just when they are on campus.

But that is just my opinion and I acknowledge that there are many different ones. The man in charge of dealing with this is one more in a long line of reasons we are fortunate to have HCBS as 'CEO' of our beloved jayhawks. RCJHGKU.

Jay Scott 6 years, 8 months ago

FOE was a bad Morris twins slogan. They're gone and have taken their bad behavior and slogans with them.

Steve Jacob 6 years, 8 months ago

McGrady failed one test, it was the big one. Every team in the tournament has one randomly selected player selected. He was pretty open about it, he smoked pot because he was not going to play due to injury. He was suspended for the 2014-15 season, so he decided to go pro. The NCAA did decide after this that a year was to harsh and cut it to half.

But we wonder why players want to unionize, on a day the KC Star said KU Basketball made a $10M profit last year.

Michael Lorraine 6 years, 8 months ago

It would be naive to think that no law abiding citizens are smoking it so the lesson is, just don't get caught until your state legalizes it.

Elden Davis 6 years, 8 months ago

I'd keep him and drug test him every month.

Michael Sillman 6 years, 8 months ago

Sure seems like a slap on the wrist to me. The release does not even say whether it is a paid or unpaid suspension.

I am surprised.

Aaron Paisley 6 years, 8 months ago

The two weeks is for the drug arrest and conviction. The punishment for withholding the arrest and conviction will happen this offseason when Howard "voluntarily" takes an assistant coaching job elsewhere.

Jay Willis 6 years, 8 months ago

http://bradleyfans.com/vb/showthread.php?t=24921

The whole timing and release of info is tied to him being an unspoken but acknowledged front runner to his hometown Bradley Braves. At leasrleast that is the prevailing explanation of the release here in Chicago and IL in general.

Brian Skelly 6 years, 8 months ago

My guess is he wont be on staff after this season. I'd also guess the only reason he's still getting a paycheck is because Self clearly has attachment to him.

As I mentioned in the previous article about this, the "what" doesnt bother me. The "when" does. To me that part IS the real issue hear. Poor judgement on Howard's part.

It's not like finding another guy to come to KU recruit would be all that difficult. It wont surprise me at all if he's gone after the year.

Im quite sure this hurts Self personally. Oye. No winners here.

Mike Tackett 6 years, 8 months ago

Why not send him to his room with no dinner. Will not help recruiting. You expect more from a coach, he's supposed to be a grown man.

Kent Noble 6 years, 8 months ago

We all make mistakes, everyone deserves a 2nd chance. Yes he should have been up front with Bill Self and the University of Kansas about this misdemeanor. To me it's not any worse than are famous alcohol related incident victims such Larry Eustachy, Bob Huggins, Gary Pinkel, how about Bobby Petrino scandal in Arkansas. I can tell you this, he's not the only one smoking a little marajuana he just happen to be the one who got caught. Water under the bridge, lets play ball!

Forrest Ranjer 6 years, 8 months ago

When did Coach "lie" to HCBS? Several ranters are claiming this is the reason to "fire" him. When did he lie? From what I've read, he just didn't tell Self. I haven't read or heard that Howard said, "That wasn't me, Coach BS".

This mightier than thou crap is really silly. How can someone out there not understand that college players, and yes, probably coaches, have been consuming "illegal" drugs for decades? And those "illegal" drugs weren't necessarily those considered harmful to your health. Many are from the pharma industry.

Maybe I'm too young (58) to understand how someone can feel personally hurt by what happened. Actually, I'm giggling. I'm not thinking that the majority of the basketball team is aspiring to be doctors and lawyers. I'm hoping they're busting their asses to get into the NBA or play beyond college. Oh, and there they'll be protected by a union that won't allow them to be punished for partaking in the use of marijuana.

I find it a bit silly to think that some of our players who have been busted with marijuana after college weren't possibly partying before they left the university. That last National Championship team. Folks, those boys could party! And I don't see you wanting to cast off that trophy and season of wins. Not clamoring for that type of self-righteous morality and judgment is hypocrisy at it's finest.

If we're going to stammer on about how bad marijuana and other drugs are, put the word out on the street that all players and coaches will be drug tested weekly and fired upon first offense. And then act upon it. Can anyone say NIT?

Joe Ross 6 years, 8 months ago

  1. Not disclosing that you were arrested in connection with drugs is egregious whether he lied about it or not. It's not like because he didn't technically lie that his silence is benign. It isn't. Even he admits this.

  2. No one is suggesting we are morally superior to Coach Howard; rather, we are saying we all live in a society where there are consequences to our behavior, and Jerrance Howard is not immune.

  3. The fact that people have been doing something illegal for decades doesn't justify one's actions.

  4. Even if a drug is not harmful to one's health that fact alone does not make it legal.

  5. Pharmaceutical drugs certainly have side effects, but they are prescribed only when the benefit of taking the medicine exceeds the risk. Furthermore, it's a case of apples and oranges because prescribed drugs are legal whereas illicit drugs are not.

  6. I doubt anyone is personally "hurt", to use your word, by Coach Howard's actions. But we are surprised at his reckless behavior while representing our program, and in that we DO have a rightful interest.

  7. While it may be thinkable that those busted with drugs after leaving college possibly used them recreationally while in school, you can't blame anyone for not prosecuting what lies outside the eye of the law. Certainly if it were known there would be an investigation and a prosecution, a fact attested to by the number of legal incidents Kansas football and basketball players have been involved in as reported here.

  8. While we may not want to cast off a championship, that does not mean we have to accept drug use. This is not self-righteous morality in the slightest.

Your comments mount to a defense of drug use, yet Coach Bill Self and Jerrance Howard himself acknowledge the wrongdoing. I wonder if you would say unequivocally that you disagree with them.

Ron Prichard 6 years, 8 months ago

I don't always agree with you, Joe, but this is the best post on this entire discussion. Every point is right on target. Well said.

Forrest Ranjer 6 years, 8 months ago

Well said Joe, but I believe several comments still amount to a degree of hypocrisy and denial.

  1. Should Howard have said something - hell yes! Hoping this was not found out was absolutely foolish. But to be called a "liar" is a bit extreme.

  2. I didn't disagree with the punishment, but there is a lot of moral indignity being displayed. Wanting the guy fired for tarnishing our reputation? Please.

  3. The fact that something illegal has been going on for years and it's excused doesn't mean someone should now be made a useless example. If you want to punish one, punish all. If you want Howard fired, call the athletic department.

  4. For all the users of drugs that fight serious diseases but are not allowed in the U.S., you bring up a great point. Why are some drugs legal for some but not for others? For Americans in several states in the union, for well over two decades, they are free to use cannabis for medical and recreational use. Kansans don't enjoy this freedom of choice, nor will they ever. Funks up heaven. For people in Illinois, your use of marijuana is not considered too serious. It's a misdemeanor. If it was seriously dangerous, jail time would have been involved.

  5. Evidently you haven't played college sports or are aware or have friends who are involved professionally. Access to Class C drugs is no issue, script or not. Been there, seen it. The Hypocritical Oath is alive and well when business proceeds depend upon athletes on the field. This even happens in high school. Your comment is so naïve.

  6. Howard did not engage in reckless behavior. I'm sorry. The guy is a basketball coach charged with getting young men to sacrifice their bodies for my enjoyment and endowment. He's not selecting presidential candidates or building nuclear missiles. The dude gets high. I don't care. You are reckless in your desire to punish.

  7. Again, this is so naïve. Now you're talking out of both sides of your mouth. We gots to punish these lawbreakers, IF we catch them. That's so hypocritical.

Joe, if you're so fired up about the drug issue, as I said, let's be the first major university to require weekly drug tests on athletes for both illegal and non-prescribed legal drugs. Not random, weekly. Let's require it of the coaching staff. And let's make it quite clear we are serious. Zero Tolerance! One failed test, you're out. Use your business card box to hold your personal items.

Let the university know, today, that you will no longer be a Williams Fund member, nor send any monies to the university, or your offspring, until this concept is installed. Let them know that until the policy is in place, and Howard is removed, that you will no longer support the university or it's sports programs. No TV. No radio. You'll disappear from all comment boards. Anything less is hypocrisy and mindless blabbering.

Joe Ross 6 years, 8 months ago

You'll notice that though we disagree vehemently, my response to you is not personal. I'd like to begin by pointing that out. Obviously I see errors in reasoning in each of your responses to my points, but to keep this short I'll just respond to the paragraph that appears to summarize your position. If a person is clean it does not matter whether they are tested yearly or daily. In fact, because the NCAA tests randomly (http://blog.syracuse.com/orangebasketball/2012/03/ncaa_drug-testing_policies_sus.html) there is no need to conduct weekly testing. Because testing can be done randomly, every player must be clean daily. And as far as zero tolerance goes, the punishment from the NCAA is immediate ineligibility. Our own University policy is random drug testing (http://www.kuathletics.com/sports/2013/6/26/GEN_0626132221.aspx?id=145). The tenets of testing that you speak of are already in place between the NCAA and the University.

Micky Baker 6 years, 8 months ago

No, it's not testing them all weekly, but the one who was convicted of possession of it in court.

He probably was tested while under supervision for 6 months,which ends today. Howard should have told Bill Self as soon as he was arrested for it. He should be tested weekly, or in some other regularity without any warning as well. His position is not any different than anyone else at the university or in the athletic department.

RJ King 6 years, 8 months ago

It's called a "lie of omission." In many instances, it's just as destructive as a lie of commission. It's about the intention to deceive. It's why a witness is instructed to "tell the WHOLE truth."

JH did not tell Self the WHOLE truth about what he did over his summer vacation. JH is NOT a player. He is a COACH. Can everyone please stop comparing apples to oranges???

Aaron Millsap 6 years, 8 months ago

IT'S A MISDEMEANOR. Some of you seem to have an agenda.

Micky Baker 6 years, 8 months ago

The President of the United States can be removed for misdemeanors too.

Jay Willis 6 years, 8 months ago

Unfortunately I agree with your statement. I suspect that if other coaches/personal were charged in such a fashion there would be an immediate and equal reaction calling for/celebrating the response KU, ADSZ, & HCBS did.

John Williams 6 years, 8 months ago

JH is guilty and is gonna pay a price greater than what the laws of Peoria, I'll. is giving and he's certainly going to pay a price greater than BS two week suspension. The mental price and reputation hit along with all the other collateral damage (fallout) that will occur cannot even b measured at this point. I agree with the poster that said get off the dope man!! Why even jeopardize this wonderful opportunity for a little self a gratification? I can see a visual of JH holding a joint up to his lips and sucking it down laughing and then pulling through mickey D's for a couple of quarter a pounders. NOT!!! That is not the visual image I have of a KU asst. men's BB coach that is going to help young men become men and help lead us to championships!!! That's the image I get of someone that isn't disciplined enough to let go of a college habit and take full advantage of a gift job from a former coach and current mentor. So, JH, don't let the doobie monster take u dow . Find something else to fill that happy need like ice-cream or job advancement. Good luck!

Bob Bailey 6 years, 8 months ago

Not much mention of drug use. Big deal in Colo -- you'd have trouble buying 'regular strength' pot.

My point is that athletes do not need drugs, and sometimes the carry over is tremendous!

Rodney Crain 6 years, 8 months ago

People asking questions lost in confusion, Well I tell them there's no problem, Only solutions,

I'm just sitting here watching the wheels go round and round, I really love to watch them roll

I just had to let this one go...

Meanwhile Baylor looms in the rapidly approaching future...

Michael Bennett 6 years, 8 months ago

The 2-week suspension seems to be synchronized with the timing of the basketball post-season, probably to minimize the distraction to the team. I agree that we might see a "voluntary" exit sometime in mid-April or after.

Harlan Hobbs 6 years, 8 months ago

Haven't taken the time to read all of the posts, but I do believe that most have put things in a proper perspective.

Coach Howard made significant mistakes, and he must pay the proper price for those mistakes. However, as a retired Employee Relations Manager for a major Fortune 500 company, I am well aware of the dilemma one faces in addressing mistakes in a fair and just manner.

One thing that has bothered me over the past several years is the apparent "rush to judgment" in connection with these types of matters. When someone in the spotlight makes a mistake, it often receives unceasing scrutiny, with many calling for the person's head from the very beginning. However, one of the hallmarks of a fair and just disciplinary system is to make sure that the punishment fits the crime.

In the arena of the workplace, a firing is often viewed as the employment equivalent of capital punishment. Of course, losing a job is in no way comparable to losing your life, so the reference is often misunderstood. All I and arbiters and other judges are saying is that a firing is generally the highest punishment available. It should be saved for the most egregious of mistakes. If it is used indiscriminately, then it loses its meaningfulness.

In this instance, Coach Self has once again demonstrated his understanding of situations on a broad basis. On one hand, Coach Howard made serious mistakes. On the other hand, is his career salvageable?

A two-week suspension is a significant punishment, and if it ends up being the type of learning experience that Coach Howard needs, and says he desires, then it will pay dividends down the road for everyone involved. My hunch is that this is just how the situation will play out.

Coach Howard has a uniquely coveted position as an assistant coach for one of the best college basketball programs in the country. His future is bright if we will do everything he can to get past this bump in the road. Good luck to him and all Jayhawk Nation.

Joe Ross 6 years, 8 months ago

You are clearly a wise person, judging with fairness and balance. Id like to take issue with one point, however. While there is the issue of fairness to JH, the University in this particular situation has a right and obligation to consider how his actions might affect the program. Firing JH over this issue would be above and beyond what is proportional; and yet because the University has its own interests at stake more drastic measures can fairly be considered to protect itself from undeserved harm. I think we agree in the spirit of what you wrote, however. He should not be exiled from society for having made a mistake. It's not at that level. But if one wishes to be free from the negative scrutiny that comes with being in a high-profile position, one should not knowingly engage in behavior of the sort that invites it.

Michael Lorraine 6 years, 8 months ago

He'll be coaching at Colorado next year. Or possibly Washington.

Harlan Hobbs 6 years, 8 months ago

Joe, I really appreciate your insight. You indeed are a wise man.

I don't disagree with you, and I did fail to raise the issue of what effect this matter has on the reputation of the university. I am making a huge assumption that the impact on KU's reputation will be minimal, but in any such situation, the offender's reputation is not the only one under scrutiny.

The fact that Coach Self apparently didn't know about the incident in advance would indicate that Coach Howard knew what his reaction might be. Coach Howard chose, in effect, to try to hide the incident which frankly is the bigger mistake.

Of course, we all make mistakes, but in the business world, we try to learn from the mistakes. In short, in just about every facet of like, the initial mistake is not the one that gets you in the most trouble. It is the subsequent attempt at coverup that ultimately can destroy your reputation.

Again, thanks Joe for pointing out an area that I didn't really address.

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