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Monday, June 24, 2013

NCAA tweaks college basketball replay, block-charge rules

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— An NCAA panel voted Monday to expand the use of replay review in college basketball, and instituted the 10-second backcourt rule for the women's game.

The Playing Rules Oversight Panel also approved a tweak to the charging-blocking foul in the men's game and gave referees leeway when it comes to penalties for accidentally elbowing an opponent above the shoulders.

The approved changes from the panel's conference call are effective immediately.

Under the replay change, officials can use video review to confirm a shot-clock violation or determine who caused the ball to go out of bounds on a deflection involving two or more players in the final two minutes of regulation or overtime.

Changes also were made for reviewing 3-pointers. For the first 36 minutes of play, officials must wait until the next media timeout to review whether a shot was a 3-point field goal. In the last four minutes of the game and the entire overtime, officials will go to the monitor immediately to determine whether a field goal was a 3.

Officials also can use the monitor to determine which player committed a foul. Previously, they were only allowed to use the monitor to determine the free-throw shooter.

The women's game will be played with a 10-second rule next season, meaning the team with possession must advance the ball past midcourt within 10 seconds or it's a turnover. Before the change was approved, teams could use as much of the 30-second shot clock as they wanted to move the ball past half-court.

The change to the charging-blocking foul and a list of points of emphasis for officials is designed to spark an offensive bump for the men's game. The scoring average in Division I last season was 67.5 points, the lowest since 1981-82. Scoring has declined each of the last four seasons in Division I.

The defender is no longer able to slide into the offensive player's path to the basket at the last moment and draw a charge. The defender has to be in position when the player on offense starts his upward motion with the ball. In addition, greater emphasis is being placed on calling fouls on defensive players who keep a hand or forearm on an opponent or use an arm bar to impede the progress of an opponent.

When it comes to an elbow above the shoulders, referees will be allowed to use a video monitor to determine the severity of the blow. If deemed inadvertent, the referee could call a player-control foul or even nothing.

Previously, a referee was required to call a flagrant-1 or flagrant-2. A flagrant-1 results in two free throws and possession for the offended team. A flagrant-2 adds an ejection for the offending player.

The panel also approved changes for wrestling and swimming and diving.

Comments

rawheadrex 10 months ago

The NCAA is becoming more like congress and state legislatures. The vagrants who populate all of these miscreant groups, elected by the public, think they must create new rules and regulations every occasion to justify their miserable existences. Would that they examine existing laws, rules and regulations and remove, reform and refine. No, that would demand thought, forbearance and integrity; qualities sadly lacking at all levels of American society today. People get the government they deserve and this is no less.

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KGphoto 10 months ago

Add an extra 10-15 minutes to every game. $$$$

I remember when games were about 1 hour 30 min. Next year it will probably be 2 hours 15 min.

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justinryman 10 months ago

In a related story, Coach K and Duke have filed an appeal against all the blocking calls that will go against his team in the 2013-14 season. In a statement by coach K he was quoated as saying, "It's like nobody wants us to play good solid D that I have coached for the last 10 years." He went on to ask, "When are they going to start fining players for flopping?"

In a rebutle quote by an unnamed source inside the NCAA, "Hey if a Duke player can buy a diamond ring for 30K, they can pay the fines for flopping."

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akgjenkintown 10 months ago

"Under the replay change, officials can use video review to confirm a shot-clock violation or determine who caused the ball to go out of bounds on a deflection involving two or more players in the final two minutes of regulation or overtime." Never understood why a bad call in the first 38 minutes is okay, while NCAA officials need to make sure everything is correctly called during only the last 2 minutes. Calls early also influence the outcome of the game. Either implement a change in the rules for the entire game or eliminate completely.

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KUFan90 10 months ago

I don't like making the elbow to the head potentially a "no call". I agree it shouldn't be an automatic flagrant 1 but I think it should at least be an automatic "normal" player control foul.

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mojayhawk 10 months ago

The emphasis on calling fouls on defensive players who keep a hand or forearm on an opponent or use an arm bar to impede the progress of an opponent.

This is designed to eliminate hand checking? If so, I don't like this rule. Rules should help players get ready for the NBA and this is nowhere close to how it is applied in the League.

Furthermore, if I am understanding this correctly, this new emphasis will potentially add many more fouls to the game, of the "ticky tack" variety. The last thing we need is more of these.

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Micky Baker 10 months ago

The change to the charge/block rule will stop a lot of the acting on charges on drives to the basket if it is applied as described. Once a player is going up for a shot, the player won't be able to slide in to draw a charge, as if the defender on that guy was beaten, you got beat to the basket and the defense will have to rotate faster. I think that's a good change.

As it was being called, a lot of the times a player wasn't out of control and got called for a foul. Some teams are going to be really angry about this. The rule on being able to use replay to determine which player committed a foul could prove controversial. For example, if a ref doesn't see a foul committed, and they call a foul on another guy. I would like to see some clarification so that they don't use replay to call a foul on a guy unrelated to the play involving the foul that they called. For example, If a guy reaches in and fouls a guy on a drive, doesn't get called, but the defender fouls the player on the shot, will they be able to call the reach in foul instead? This could lead to post players being protected. This could be very controversial in close games.

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The_poster_kusports_needs 10 months ago

wrestling and swimming and diving and and and and and

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The_poster_kusports_needs 10 months ago

Checking every 3-pointer in the last 4 minutes? Way to make the game grind to a complete halt...

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