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Originally published June 13, 2012 at 05:39p.m., updated June 14, 2012 at 12:00a.m.

Doc Sadler officially named director of basketball operations for KU men’s basketball

Doc Sadler, former Nebraska head coach, laughs next to Kansas guard Travis Releford as they watch the final minutes of the campers' basketball game agains the counselors on Wednesday, June 13, 2012 at the Horejsi Center. Sadler is expected to take the director of basketball operations job.

Doc Sadler, former Nebraska head coach, laughs next to Kansas guard Travis Releford as they watch the final minutes of the campers' basketball game agains the counselors on Wednesday, June 13, 2012 at the Horejsi Center. Sadler is expected to take the director of basketball operations job.

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Doc Sadler says he’s going to enjoy the Allen Fieldhouse experience a lot more as a member of the home team’s basketball staff than he did as a visitor.

“I promise you the bench on that (northwest) end is a heck of a lot better than the one I’ve been on. I’m not the smartest guy in the world, but I know the view will be a lot better on that end,” former Nebraska coach Sadler joked to the Journal-World on Wednesday after officially being named KU’s director of basketball operations. “To have this opportunity is unbelievable, kind of like a dream come true. I hope to not wake up.”

Sadler’s five Nebraska teams from 2007-11 went 0-5 in the fieldhouse, losing to KU by 3, 11, 17, 35 and 46 points. NU didn’t play KU last season — Sadler’s sixth and final year in Lincoln — following the Huskers’ move from the Big 12 to the Big 10.

“It’s unbelievable,” Sadler said of joining (Bill) Self’s KU staff. “It seems like two or three times I’ve talked to coach Self about working for him, and it never seemed to work out. I appreciate the opportunity he’s given me. He has such a great staff. Anything I can do to make those guys’ jobs easier is what I want to do. I’ll do whatever I can to help those guys out.“

Sadler replaces Barry Hinson, who served in the director of basketball operations position for two seasons before taking over as head coach at Southern Illinois in April.

“I’ve known Doc for 25 years and have certainly followed his career. Watching his career at UTEP (head coach for two years) and seeing and competing against him when he was at Nebraska sold me on his ability for him to come in here and make us better,” Self said.

“Very few programs in the country have the experience that our staff will have with Joe (Dooley), Kurtis (Townsend), Norm (Roberts) and now adding Doc into the mix,” Self added. “We lost two great coaches this past year due to staff turnover — Danny (Manning) getting the job at Tulsa and Barry (Hinson) getting the job at Southern Illinois. We replace them with Norm Roberts, who is a terrific coach and recruiter and was a head coach at St. John’s for six years, and Doc Sadler, who has done just about everything and has been a head Division I coach for eight years. I’m excited. My batteries are charged, and I know he’s ready to get to work July 1.”

Sadler, who has been in Lawrence all week, first interviewing for the job, then observing Self’s basketball camp, went 101-89 in six seasons at NU. His Huskers advanced to the NIT in 2008, 2009 and 2011. His 2009 team finished Big 12 play with an 8-8 league record, the Huskers’ best conference mark in a decade, and his 2008 team posted a 20-13 record, giving NU its first 20-win season since 1999. Overall, at NU Sadler had eight wins against ranked squads in six years.

Prior to Nebraska, Sadler spent two seasons as the head coach at UTEP, where he compiled a 48-18 record: 27-8 in 2005 and 21-10 in 2006. His 27 wins in 2005 rank ninth on the NCAA list for first-year head coaches. 

Sadler’s first head coaching stint was at Arkansas-Fort Smith (1998-99 through 2002-03). He has a career coaching record of 269-146 in 13 seasons, including a Division I record of 149-107 in eight seasons.

A native of Greenwood, Ark., Sadler served one season as a high school coach, guiding County Line High to a 38-7 record.

“This is an unbelievable opportunity to have a chance to get back into college basketball,” Sadler said. “When making decisions, I really thought I would sit out this year (perhaps working in TV), but when this came along I don’t think anyone would ever pass it up. I am thankful to coach Self in giving me this opportunity. To be part of a program such as Kansas is unbelievable,” added Sadler, who also worked as an assistant at Arkansas (1982-85), Lamar (1985-86), Houston (1986), Chicago State (1987-88), Texas Tech (1991-94), Arizona State (1994-97) and UTEP (2003-04).

He met Self when he was coaching at Fort Smith and Self at Oklahoma State.

“We had some players he recruited,” Sadler said. “We were two finalists for the Oral Roberts (head coaching) job. I was at Texas Tech and he got the job. We talked several times and developed a friendship. We know all the same people. I’ve gotten to know his family. That’s been neat. I’ve known Norm since he was at Oral Roberts. Kurtis ... I thought I had him hired at UTEP. And coach Dooley I’ve known as well. There’s not a better staff.”

Sadler and his wife, Tonya, who is also a native of Greenwood, Ark., have two sons, Landon and Matthew. The plans right now are for his family to remain in Lincoln.

“I told my wife I feel like I’m going to college,” Sadler said with a laugh.

Asked when he wants to be a head coach again, he said: “I am a coach. But I’m not thinking about that. I’m thinking about doing the best job I can here.”

Comments

Pitthawk34 2 years, 6 months ago

Perfect hire. Class guy with a personality.

Jeff Kilgore 2 years, 6 months ago

When Sadler was an NU, he answered the "how did the beating go?" (against KU) questions with more patience than most coaches did. I appreciated that he didn't belittle his players or make excuses but just answered the questions the best he could. Very glad he's part of the team now.

Saguaro_Jayhawk 2 years, 6 months ago

45 games [38-7 record] in one season of HS ball in Arkansas. That seems like a LOT of games for HS ball.

hawk316 2 years, 6 months ago

I was impressed with Coach Sadler when he was at Nebraska. This seems like a great hire. Welcome to Lawrence, Doc!

Eride 2 years, 6 months ago

This is a great hire. I always thought he was a very good coach who did the best with what he was given. Glad to have him be a part of the KU staff.

jhawk613 2 years, 6 months ago

Doc is a great X's and O's guy and will be a major piece in practices. Having another Head Coach (along with Norm) to bounce ideas off will be great for Coach Self.

I think this hire is great.

Lonnie Ross Dillon 2 years, 6 months ago

As director of BB Ops, it's my understanding that he cannot participate in practice...

oldalum 2 years, 6 months ago

My understanding is he can't work with players. He can sit and talk to Self as much as he wants, at practice or anywhere else, and talk about anything he wants, including the practice going on in front of him. Just can't do any direct coaching of players.

gchawk 2 years, 6 months ago

Apparently Big B thinks that Coach only hired Sadler because of their friendship. Make no mistake about it, they are friends, but Sadler comes with a wealth of experience and "Nollege".

tomkeegslovechild 2 years, 6 months ago

I think it absolutely played a factor in Doc getting this job. But who can blame BIll. Why would you want to hire someone you don't like? And how do people get great jobs anymore... It's not what you know, it's who you know.

Millsey20 2 years, 6 months ago

Big B's right... and yet it's the most irrelevant post I've seen. I just don't get it.

Self became friends with all these "cronies" through coaching basketball.. .they are basketball minds... it's their lives... so it's not like he's giving his delinquent, illiterate nephew Joe Blow who's never even been to a basketball game a job.

I guess it's better that he interviews people and hires whichever stranger is the smoothest talker... instead of going with someone he really knows and knows their philosophies and character.

conlawgrad 2 years, 6 months ago

I love Doc! I think he did a great job at Nebraska where basketball is not the prominent sport and I think he got hosed there. Glad to have him here!

Sam Constance 2 years, 6 months ago

A petty, vindictive, grudge-holding hoser.

squintseugene1 2 years, 6 months ago

Love the hire cant wait the see him sitting on the KU bench

slantrox 2 years, 6 months ago

One of the things that I am most impressed with Doc is the fact the guy could be a tremendous role model for today's youth. This is a guy that didn't play college basketball and worked his tail off earning squat for 20 years in every -berg or -ville along the way. Finally he gets some shots at his dream and makes the most of them and in the end has made a nice life for him and his family! This is the true American Story, nothing handed to him that he did dig and claw to achieve. Nebraska is a tough place to coach Basketball and he did it better than many before him there!

Young people out there take note, that you don't have to have everything handed to you coming out of mommy and daddy's basement! Go out and do the dirty work necessary to learn about life while keeping your eye on your dreams!

Congrats to Doc and to all those that work their tails off not knowing if the dream will ever happen, but with the perseverance to keep working toward goals. Coach, you will be a head coach again and the experience you will learn at KU will just be another of those unforeseen, but capitalized upon forks in the road!

Byrd313 2 years, 6 months ago

Love this hire. I was always impressed with Doc. His teams played hard and didn't back down. Welcome to the best place on Earth Doc. Glad to have you!!

LAJayhawk 2 years, 6 months ago

Welcome to the family.

Rock Chalk, Doc.

Phil Perry 2 years, 6 months ago

Glad to have Doc on the staff but he should be a head coach.

rhollinshed 2 years, 6 months ago

Nope...not at all. laughing because you plunged into a conference that will make your brand irrelevent! Big 12 is in a cash windfall of it's own. We didn't have to bolt to get ours..........

BIGREDTIME 2 years, 6 months ago

Big ten network brings in more money than the sec network u still don't bring in the revenue. West Virginia and tcu aren't really going to up that cash money

NebraskaJayhawk 2 years, 6 months ago

You said it exactly...cash.

No..I think what he was referring to was the 100 years of rivalry the two teams had...with Nebraska throwing that aside for money. It's sad really when money drives these kinds of decisions. The Big XII is going to be okay without Nebraska, it's just a shame the decision was made for the almighty dollar. I do agree that Texas was a huge part in this decision, however. I would have much rather seen Texas leave than Nebraska. Something should have been worked out to keep Nebraska, Colorado, & Missouri.

BIGREDTIME 2 years, 6 months ago

Except every school was ready to leave sick of these delusional fans discussing rivalry when all it was was ass kicking in football and vice versa in basketball...the Oklahoma game was gone so what was the point in staying

BIGREDTIME 2 years, 6 months ago

U get a competitive football program and then talk trash last time I checked we beat Ohio st last year something u can't fathom of doing. I'll give this Charlie Weiss is a good coach hes a got a shot of doing it.

BIGREDTIME 2 years, 6 months ago

In football the sport they care about no u didn't lol

ahpersecoachingexperience 2 years, 6 months ago

Any word on if/when his sons will be walking on?

justinryman 2 years, 6 months ago

The one is already enrolled at UNL to be a freshman in the fall. The other is staying Lincoln to finish highschool it sounds like, he is going to be a sophomore. Sounds like his wife is staying with the boys as Doc moves.

Steve Williams 2 years, 6 months ago

This comment was removed by the site staff for violation of the usage agreement.

Martin Rosenblum 2 years, 6 months ago

You do realize that your comment must be removed, right? Not only is that a display of poor judgement and racism, it just isn't funny on any level. Sorry, cosmic....try posting something much less offensive.

Tony Bandle 2 years, 6 months ago

WOW...deletes, two for two...wanna try for the trifecta!!??

Steve Williams 2 years, 6 months ago

Please tell me how the truth is racist... Did you play college sports? Did you get recruited by major universities? Did you hang out with kirk,Aaron,mike lee,and Keith.? Did you ever supply any mentioned above with birth control while at brothers in the bathroom? Did you watch random girls fresh off the farm line up to get a shot? Well, I did,, to all of it,,,,watch he got game, the scene at tech, happens all the time,,, and that my friend is doc's new job,,,to facilitate that "action"

ahpersecoachingexperience 2 years, 6 months ago

This comment was removed by the site staff for violation of the usage agreement.

justinryman 2 years, 6 months ago

Living in Nebraska, I was liked the Doc hire for UNL years back, then I wondered why.

Then I got a chance to meet him and well I got it. He is honest, he knows the game. He knows kids. Unfortunately he was trying to recruit kids to a University that didn't care about basketball.

Sure they built a new practice facility and offices, it was needed, their old offices were in the basement of the Devaney Sports Center. Sure when you build a new facility it better be tops in the country. They also get a new arena, that doesn't automatically equate to wins.

Doc will be a very good fit into Coach Self's program and for the University of Kansas. Plus with his ties to Texas, you just never know.

I like this hire, can't wait for November to roll around and see what this team does with the momentum of the 2011-12 season.

Carl Anderson 2 years, 6 months ago

Somebody please, get this guy a blue shirt!

illuminatironin 2 years, 6 months ago

Glad to have you Doc! I always thought you did a good job at Nebraska.

KemDooKU 2 years, 6 months ago

Can't go wrong with Doc. - nice one Self.... You the man!

woodscolt 2 years, 6 months ago

Classy person and great coach. He had difficulty recruiting at Nebraska but did very well coaching what he had to work with. Great addition to Bill's staff, however, I hope Doc finds another head coaching job. Can't hurt his resume to spend a little time on Self's staff.

Tony Bandle 2 years, 6 months ago

I will be honest with all of you...that is the first photo of Doc Sandler that I have ever seen him smiling. It must be great not to be down by 30 with three minutes left in the first half!!

Jonathan Allison 2 years, 6 months ago

I thought the same thing when I saw the picture! Never seen Doc Sadler smile before.

jaybate 2 years, 6 months ago

Rock Chalk, Dalk.

Self is amazing.

He keeps finding ways to help people with the system.

Rock Chalk, Bill.

jaybate 2 years, 6 months ago

Travis and Dalk Sadler.

Common foreheads.

omng392 2 years, 6 months ago

Great leader aren't affraid to surrond themselves with great talent. Great hire HCBS!!

jaybate 2 years, 6 months ago

Its easy to surround yourself with great talent, when you are at a high level, but it is hard to get that great talent to cooperate productively, and not destroy itself and you from within.

To get it to cooperate, you have to surround yourself with a mixture of great talent that is not your friend, and great talent that is your friend.

Everyone can't be your friend. Its not good if they are, because you can't pit your friends against each other and still have them as friends.

Average leaders are average in part because they usually struggle with getting the right mix of talented friends and talented non friends. The insecure rely too much on friends. The over confident don't rely enough on friends.

Friendship is a strategic commodity in any kind of management.

The great talent that is your friend keeps the great talent that is not your friend on guard and occupied, and so allows you to get the maximum benefit of both. If all of your talented friends are working with other of your talented friends, they aren't on edge, as they would be against an adversary that is not a friend. And if every one is not a friend, then ambition and disloyalty quickly run amok and a Shakespearian tragedy unfolds.

Eisenhower proved a genius at putting talented friends in key positions both as allied commander and as President, and used them to parry other talented people that were necessary to work with, but not necessarily loyal friends.

And because great friendship and great talent are always in somewhat short supply, you usually have to work with some talented persons that area not your most loyal friends, even when you get to do the hiring without interference.

Eisenhower used the brilliant, trustworthy Bradley he had been friends with since their first year at the academy, to keep first Patton and then Montgomery, two brilliant, but supremely ambitious officers, on the leash.

Threatening to use a hammer is never how you make the extremely ambitious work for you. You carry it always, but it only gives them limits. The way you get them to work for you is to force them to work closely with a brilliant friend, someone they know they maybe able to out smart once in a great while, but can never hope to turn against you.

This is why Bradley, not Montgomery, or Patton, were Eisenhower's most important generals.

Bradley allowed Eisenhower to use Patton and Montgomery. Bradley allowed Eisenhower to leverage off their brilliance for most of the war, rather than have to use them briefly and then s-can them for wrecking the team.

jaybate 2 years, 6 months ago

Without Bradley, Eisenhower would never have been able to get even as much as he did from those two ego maniacs. And Bradley's supreme loyalty and great talent, also enabled Eisenhower to rid himself of Mark Clark, another non-loyal talent he might have otherwise needed. With Bradley at his side, Eisenhower could throw Churchill the bone of the strategically unnecessary Italian campaign, thus clearing Churchhill from obstructing the D-Day invasion, and rid himself of Clark, who certain oligarchic players were reputedly moving into position to replace Eisenhower, when either Eisenhower faltered, or FDR died, by bogging Clark down in a career tarnishing Italian campaign. Oh, my was Eisenhower an awesomely skilled manager of staff!

This maneuvering of other persons is a great talent to have.

Self seems as savvy about fitting staffs together, as he is about fitting teams together.

Self's staffs appear to be a healthy combination of Bradleys and Patton/Montgomery types.

Self seems to understand that it is not enough to be able to fire some ambitious, talented fellow for stepping out of line.

The great leader knows how to keep the ambitious, talented fellow from stepping so far out of line that he has to fire them.

Self just will not give the upper hand to anyone below him--staff or player.

Few other coaches than Self would have had the self confidence and foresight to force Josh Selby to play the 3 in order to develop Tyshawn at the 1 in order to look out for the long term interests and continuity of the program.

And all of these ambitious, wily fellows he hires that he knows will be moving on soon, know it, too.

Self sets up his staff, so that he can always afford to see someone go.

I am endlessly impressed by this ability to do this.

A lot of CEOs would benefit from studying how Self manages his staff.

He's not perfect, but he's darned good...and no one's perfect.

jaybate 2 years, 6 months ago

Post Script: No plan is perfect. Patton got out of line a number of times and had to be disciplined. He abandoned Montgomery's flank on Sicily. He slapped a soldier in a tent. He committed faux pas about our allies. He even violated orders and sent part of his armored division south on Operation Baum to free his son in law from a POW camp, when his full force was ordered north to take Berlin. But because of Bradley's both talented and loyal presence, Eisenhower could put Patton in the dog house temporarily and use him again and again, rather than literally send him home to be drummed out of the army permanently. He could rely on Bradley to manage Patton, such as was possible, both in the dog house and in the war, and to take Patton back, because Eisenhower wanted him back, when officers less loyal that Bradley probably would not have been willing to take him back.

Joe Ross 2 years, 6 months ago

File this one under "The Kansas-Nebraska Act". I went to three games in Lincoln at the Devaney center during Doc Sadler's tenure there, and I will tell you the guy had their gym rockin'. He did a lot with lower-level talent, and he's a scrappy kind of coach that is very knowledgeable about the game of basketball. I would loved to have seen him on the bench as an assistant coach because I think Docs strength is directly with the players, but I won't argue with the genius that is Bill Self. No matter how you slice it up, this is a homerun hire.

jaybate 2 years, 6 months ago

Director of Basketball Opps, or assistant coach?

If Dalk Sadler wanted to stay on the staff for x number of years and recruit, then he would have been hired as an assistant.

But Dalk Sadler probably wanted to jump to the next job without such a commitment, so Self made him Director of Basketball Opps.

Using these guys as Directors of Basketball Opps also has this benefit: guys that have been fired after a long struggle often need a break to recharge their batteries. An assistant coach for Bill Self probably works incredibly long hours and has to take the heat from Self when strategy, tactics, or recruiting problems occur. Being Director of Basketball Opps lets them out of the pressure cooker for a couple of years, so they will be refreshed when they return to the sidelines as head coaches, or even as full time assistants.

Joe Ross 2 years, 6 months ago

This is more proof positive that you dont know a damn thing about sports. There is virtually no coach who gets fired and wants to stay out of coaching. Most of them, being former players, are competitive and are ready to jump right back into it. This is the case almost always unless the coach is getting old, and even old coaches have a hard time putting down the whistle even for one season. There is no evidence that you can offer that can say as a general rule that fired coaches want to "recharge their batteries". This is more projection out of a mind that attempts to confer upon a world a perspective that is uniquely his own and uniquely detached from what is the reality. In fact, Doc Sadler interviewed for the Southern Miss vacancy and was rumored to be interested in Air Force among other jobs, and it was NOT because he needed the money. Doc Sadler's buyout from Nebraska? $66,667/month until he found another job up to $3.4 million! So I ask you, Mr. Pretends-to-know-Everything, why is Sadler interviewing for/interested in coaching jobs if he needs to recharge his batteries?

Why the DOBO then? Because that's where a hole was that needed to be filled. NOT because Sadler would not have wanted to coach.

Idiot.

Joe Ross 2 years, 6 months ago

The differences between you and me are stark, and among them is the fact that I don't need to write volumes to say absolutely nothing. In your post about whether or not Doc was better suited to be an assistant coach or the director of basketball operations you said nothing of his coaching prowess (it had to do instead with whether or not he needed time to "recharge"), and I never attempted to answer the question of how good he was; nevertheless, your most recent post blathers incessantly on about his virtue as a coach. Two points here. First, you are off topic which is not surprising given your propensity for rambling on. Secondly, I'm quite comfortable arguing the case that Doc is not only suited well to be cut-out as an assistant, but was in fact better qualified for that position than the person who filled the vacancy; namely, one Norm Roberts whose 88-169 head coaching record gives him a polished .342 winning percentage. Now given that Coach Self describes Roberts as an "excellent coach" (direct quote), I'd say Sadler's 149-107 record (.582) compares more than favorably, so that by logical extension one might safely assume Self thinks that Doc is an excellent coach, despite your best efforts to cast him in a different light. You also denigrate Doc's coaching despite the fact that his program was Nebraska's, not quite close to being considered a behemoth in Division I basketball. Doc's winning percentage at Nebraska was better than Danny Nee's, by the way. But again, getting recruits to come to Lincoln is like convincing jocks to take ugly girls to the prom. It's a hard sell, but you might know something about it. Bottom line, Doc would have been better suited for an assistant coaching position than Roberts but in sports timing means a lot. But to hell with all this digression. Doc did not need to recharge his batteries as you errantly suggested which is clearly demonstrable by his application(s) to other head coaching vacancies. Checkmate. Idiot.

jaybate 2 years, 6 months ago

Poor, poor, jloss.

Perhaps you never worked in a profession, or perhaps you are slipping badly, possibly into dementia? Which might it be, jloss? :-)

Dalk's career appears in trouble. He appears practically unemployable right now, as a head coach, at a major, and, if your assertions were correct (sometimes a dubious assumption to make about you), has not even been hired by a mid major. This obvious-mastery, even you should grasp it.

Dalk is in middle age and he has not recently (if ever) turned a major, or a mid major program around. His only head coaching accomplishment of recent note has been to keep what Billy Clyde had going at UTEP going for a very short while, before jumping to Nebraska.

Dalk can't walk into an interview and say, "Well, I turned that program around," unless you go back to Arkansas-Fort Smith, and somehow I doubt that an AD at a major, or even an ambitious mid major, is going to be very juiced about what he did at Ark-Ft.Smith, when it was not even in D1.

At Nebraska, Dalk never came close to turning NU around. He couldn't recruit well enough to get over the hump. Some blame the school for his failure, but good recruiters that are also good coaches find a way to turn programs around where ever they go. Dalk has never demonstrated that he is a strong enough recruiter, as a head coach, to keep a major program on a path to sustained success.

Though a perhaps demented fellow, like yourself, may not recognize this, ADs at Division 1 majors, and even at ambitious mid majors, can find quite a few coaching candidates that have turned a program, or two around.

So: given the above circumstances, Dalk's interviewing (and not getting hired) apparently means Dalk was out there interviewing not too successfully to try to keep from slipping into coaching oblivion.

jaybate 2 years, 6 months ago

Dalk is not a hot coaching property. Like you, he never played D1 ball. However, unlike you, at least he did learn his game at a D1 level, first as a student manager, then as an assistant under a D1 legend--Eddie.

Right now, Dalk is just another middle aged coach that failed in his big chance at a major, got fired, has an uninspiring coaching record, and has to do anything he possibly can to stay in the game, or be smiling and selling insurance from here to 65, or worse, wind up frustrated, hollowed out and carrying water for others, as you appear sometimes to be doing shamelessly. :-)

My comments so far are not a criticism of Dalk, at all, who obviously knows his Xs and Os and who learned from the same genius Self learned from--Eddie.

Most coaches--including a lot of very smart and talented Xs and Os coaches--have mediocre careers and fall out of the majors, because they lack the full spectrum of skills (and luck) the profession requires. Only a few make it to the top and stay there in any profession. Not doing so does not mark one a failure. Among the good guys, it means one did one's best and the competition and odds and luck were not with one.

Being a professional basketball coach is ferociously competitive in managerial and bureaucratic ways you probably cannot grasp. Most professions have this aspect more or less, though, so it makes me wonder if you have ever been a professional at anything. So often your remarks suggest you to be just another frustrated small time jock that found a way to feed himself and so thinks he knows something about the profession of coaching, or any other profession. Alas, having bounced a ball a couple seasons in the bush leagues only makes you an authority on...bouncing a ball in the bush leagues. You just don't sound like you've worked in the big leagues in any field before, but maybe you failed upwards awhile and without a clue; that's also a possibility. :-)

Next, if I were an idiot, jloss, I suspect I would tower over your IQ, and especially your emotional IQ, so I don't feel much need to comment further on that. :-)

Now, back to the good Dalktor.

Dalk Sadler appeared to coach the last few seasons knowing he might be fired at any moment--hanging by a Dr. Tom thread as it were. Its hard work hanging in limbo for so long. It wears persons out. Again, I am not sure why you cannot grasp that. Again, perhaps you are intellectually challenged, or slipping into less brain function. I just don't know for sure. :-)

Of course, Dalk is probably burned out, jloss.

jaybate 2 years, 6 months ago

Dr. Tom appeared to work him over pretty good, as apparent Machiavellis do from time to time to hard working, good guys trying honestly to make it in the world.

Your appearing not to grasp this makes me wonder if you ever were one of the good guys.

Anyway, Dalk appeared to get a serious career jerking by his boss for quite along time, while Dr. Tom and the powers that be in Cornland figured out how to get into the Big Ten, then transition. Part of the process, apparently, was for Dr. Tom to give Dalk the hook after getting to the Big Ten, so Dr. Tom would have some one to take the blame for the transition struggles. Better to blame Dalk, I reckon, than to blame a shiny new hire the first year. But only Dr. Tom knows for sure.

Now good guys, like Dalk appears to be, when they are confronted with Machiavellis, or what today get called disingenuous bosses, they usually resort to their work ethic, and they keep driving themselves harder and harder and harder to try to survive the Machiavelli. And the longer the Machiavelli drives them the more exhausted they become, and the more freyed their nerves become. They often get job burnout, jloss, though I increasingly doubt you would have a clue about job burnout. Ya gotta be one of the good guys to know about job burn out. Ya gotta have had a disingenuous boss to know about job burn out. it is not enough to be a disingenuous boss to really understand job burn out in mid career. Capice?

Dalk probably loves basketball and basketball coaching as deeply as anyone; almost certainly more deeply than a frustrated former bush leaguer that has never been to the top (perhaps like you) can understand.

Let's see here, gloss, now, I'm going to try to scale this down to a primer for you.

Division 1 basketball coaching has given many, many, many very, very good men, almost certainly better persons than you, job burn out by mid career.

Further, the unforgiving competitiveness of D1 basketball has left many, many very good coaches with losing records and dead end careers in mid life.

Dalk looked burned out two years ago.

Dalk has an inadequate record.

Dalk is in middle age.

Good men in Dalk's situation have for years needed a place to recharge batteries in mid career, restore their tarnished images, reconnect with their families, and yet stay in the game, so they could parlay their experience down the road into a re-entry into the game. And it is almost certainly easier to market yourself to a prospective employer, when you are employed at KU, than when you are home reading a paper.

Coach Self has figured out a way to do this for two coaches he obviously feels are good men worthy of second chances: first, Barry, now Dalk. And both men have such rich experience as head coaches that they were/are valuable to Coach Self in a variety of ways.

If you can't grasp this after this post, then in your words you seem an...

Idiot.

:-)

Joe Ross 2 years, 6 months ago

The differences between you and me are stark, and among them is the fact that I don't need to write volumes to say absolutely nothing. In your post about whether or not Doc was better suited to be an assistant coach or the director of basketball operations you said nothing of his coaching prowess (it had to do instead with whether or not he needed time to "recharge"), and I never attempted to answer the question of how good he was; nevertheless, your most recent post blathers incessantly on about his virtue as a coach. Two points here. First, you are off topic which is not surprising given your propensity for rambling on. Secondly, I'm quite comfortable arguing the case that Doc is not only suited well to be cut-out as an assistant, but was in fact better qualified for that position than the person who filled the vacancy; namely, one Norm Roberts whose 88-169 head coaching record gives him a polished .342 winning percentage. Now given that Coach Self describes Roberts as an "excellent coach" (direct quote), I'd say Sadler's 149-107 record (.582) compares more than favorably, so that by logical extension one might safely assume Self thinks that Doc is an excellent coach, despite your best efforts to cast him in a different light. You also denigrate Doc's coaching despite the fact that his program was Nebraska's, not quite close to being considered a behemoth in Division I basketball. Doc's winning percentage at Nebraska was better than Danny Nee's, by the way. But again, getting recruits to come to Lincoln is like convincing jocks to take ugly girls to the prom. It's a hard sell, but you might know something about it. Bottom line, Doc would have been better suited for an assistant coaching position than Roberts but in sports timing means a lot. But to hell with all this digression. Doc did not need to recharge his batteries as you errantly suggested which is clearly demonstrable by his application(s) to other head coaching vacancies. Checkmate. Idiot.

jaybate 2 years, 6 months ago

Nebraska is going to be a doormat in the Big Ten football and basketball very soon.

The ghost of Bob Devaney must be reeling.

Devaney always understood who they were and what they were.

Dr. Tom?

He got on the gravy train and he kept it going, but he apparently never understood, how they got there.

hawksfanatic 2 years, 6 months ago

Doc is a great hire. Welcome to KU, Doc. Go, Jayhawks!

Husker83Hoops 2 years, 6 months ago

As a Nebraska Basketball fan, I can assure you won't be disappointed with the hire. Doc is one of the classiest, genuine, down-to-earth individuals I've been around.He will bring an outstanding work-ethic to Lawrence and you guys will love his personality. Great hire for KU!

Tony Bushard 2 years, 6 months ago

Really happy with this hire. I live in Lincoln and the day after his last big loss, one reporter asked him--both parties knowing that it was matter of days if not hours before Doc would be fired--what he though his next move would be and he said (roughly) "Well, I'll wake up tomorrow and take my kids to school and consider myself luckier than a lot of the rest of the world." I've always been impressed with those remarks, admired his class following the press conference, and hope he has nothing but success at KU.

fikeasaurus 2 years, 6 months ago

I really like this hire. HCBS obviously recoginizes those who know the game. Although Doc took some beat downs while at NU, he always had a game plan and was passionate about his work. He won't be with KU long because he is a good coach and capable of moving on. A great mind in the program short term. If he stays longer, even better. Welcome aboard Doc Sadler.

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