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Wednesday, July 18, 2012

Tait

Weis masters motivational art of ‘button-pushing’

Kansas University quarterback Dayne Crist, left, listens to KU coach Charlie Weis during spring drills on Tuesday, March 27, 2012, at the practice fields south of Memorial Stadium.

Kansas University quarterback Dayne Crist, left, listens to KU coach Charlie Weis during spring drills on Tuesday, March 27, 2012, at the practice fields south of Memorial Stadium.

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One of the eye-opening bits of information that came from a recent sit-down with Kansas University football coach Charlie Weis was the fact that the man keeps a mattress and blankets in his office so he can grab some quick sleep before getting back to work without having to go home for the night.

That box of bedding was not put there for show, nor does it go unused. Weis is famous for working while others are asleep and is dedicated to putting countless hours into coaching.

Part of his intense work ethic came from his blue-collar, New Jersey upbringing. Many of the people Weis grew up around had this same mentality in their jobs, and that sense of pride rubbed off on him at an early age. But one of the most recent men who inspired Weis to become such a hard worker was Bill Parcells, the legendary NFL coach whom Weis credits for shaping him into the coach he is today.

“Parcells was the ultimate button-pusher,” Weis said. “He’d find what button made everyone achieve a higher level and he’d keep on pressing that button.”

Most days, Weis had a front row seat to watch Parcells push, prod and manipulate his players into digging deeper. Every once in a while, and with some regularity, Parcells picked the buttons that belonged to his coaching staff.

Weis remembers well the first time Parcells fired his way.

“With me, it was questioning my work ethic,” Weis said. “I always worked as hard or harder than anyone, but it would be 11 o’clock at night, we’d be at Hofstra (University for training camp), I’d be the only one left in the building, everyone else is gone and he’d walk by as I’d be getting my coat on to go ahead and leave and he’d say, ‘Another early night, huh?’ And then he’d walk out, knowing that I’d take my coat off (and say), ‘OK, there’s something else I could be doing.’ He knew what button to push and he’d press it and he’d press it and he’d press it. And he did it with everyone. He was the best. Always will be.”

As the years went by, Weis not only got used to Parcells’ signature style — even evolving to be able to predict when it was coming — but also began to incorporate the art into his own coaching playbook.

The list of players whose buttons Weis has pushed is long and still growing, but one in particular holds special significance for Kansas fans.

Sometime in early 2008, when a highly-touted high school quarterback out of California named Dayne Crist made one final trip to Notre Dame, Weis did his finest work.

“The day he came in to visit,” Weis recalled, “he was about ready to commit to LSU, and I said, ‘What? Are you afraid of competing against (Notre Dame starter Jimmy) Clausen?’ Well, then he committed three days later to us. Because that wasn’t him. I pressed the right button with that one.”

If not for that move, Crist probably would have gone to LSU, and, therefore, probably would not be the starting quarterback at KU today.

That’s just one example of the dozens of strategies that Weis swiped from Parcells. But it seems to be the one he’s most proud of, and, even though he’s only been around his new team for seven months, Weis already has started pushing buttons in Lawrence.

“We’ve settled in on a lot of them,” he said. “But the thing is you’re gonna have to learn the new ones. Recruiting them and actually having them here are two different things, now. Obviously, the ones you knew already are easy. (Notre Dame transfers, Mike) Ragone and Anthony McDonald coming here, they’re easy. Because I’ll say things to them a lot colder than I will most other people. If they screw up, it’s bad. I mean really bad. As bad as you’ve ever heard it. Just think of the worst you’ve ever heard and go a lot worse than that.”

Weis says this with not so much as a hint of a smile. It’s fact. Business. His way of doing things. And, just as his mentor did with the whole button-pushing thing, Weis takes great pride in his ability to reach his players this way.

“I can safely say there isn’t a player that I can’t break down within 60 seconds,” Weis said.

On this team?

“On any team,” he said.

Comments

fearthephog512 2 years ago

Nice story, Matt. I just hope Weis is pushing the right combination of buttons to generate some wins this year. In any case, it should be a fun season to watch. Rock Chalk!

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Bangkok_Jayhawk 2 years ago

It's OK now because Gill was too soft. When Mangino was run out of town, everyone wanted a nice guy to replace this wretched Mangino who was poking players in the chest and calling them names... We got 2 years of Gill. Now that he is gone, everyone is ready for a football coach again.

Nice people rarely make good football coaches. Even when they do, I assume it is because they turn the nice switch off at work.

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april28 2 years ago

Mangino was on his way out. His methods were tired, he couldn't recruit and, if not for having one of the greatest QB's in the history of the school, he would have been fired earlier. He rode Reesing's coat tails and, when Reesing left, everybody could see that the program was on a steep decline.

Last time I saw, Weis hadn't been kicked out of a high school football game for being a jerk. Mangino should have been fired the night that happened.

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KGphoto 2 years ago

If Reesing was riding a coattail is was Ed Warriner's, and Mangino never won 8 or more games without Reesing.

With Reesing: 25-13 Without Reesing: 25-35.

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KGphoto 2 years ago

Did I stutter?

With Reesing: 25-13, 66% --- Without Reesing: 25-35, 41%

And That doesn't count the 7 straight losses at the end, that seemed to be a direct result of Mangino's method boiling over.

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KGphoto 2 years ago

Mangino climbed to "middling" status in year two, and stayed there for the next 4 seasons. Reesing took the team over the top. And if he was such a genius in finding Reesing, why did he take so long to put him in?

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number1jayhawker 2 years ago

Fail. KSU and Duke offered Todd also.

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april28 2 years ago

If Kerry hadn't been hurt, Mangino wouldn't have even had the common sense to start Reesing. Facts hurt. Mangino was a good bowl coach....other than that a below-average record at KU.

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april28 2 years ago

What was his overall record at KU? How about his conference record? How about his conference record on the road? Yes, the facts are clear....below average in almost every meaningful category. I will give him credit for standing up to Texas, sort of.

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hawk316 2 years ago

Actually, IIBastardo, according to an article on Reesing in Kansan.com, "Kansas State was one of the first colleges to recruit him — along with Northwestern, Duke, TCU and Purdue — and it wasn’t until he was on his way to visit Manhattan when Kansas contacted him."

Still, your point has some validity. Mangino did give him a shot, but I think April makes, perhaps, an even stronger point. Reesing's magnificent play greatly contributed to Mangino's success.


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Keith Hummel 2 years ago

I guess I missed the paragraph that says Weis makes his players Bear-Crawl across 200-degree turf if they miss a weigh-in.

http://deadspin.com/5418408/mark-mangino-mistreats-his-players-in-cruel-exotic-ways

Not "exactly" the same thing.

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hawk316 2 years ago

atljaybird, you're exactly right. If we can believe what we've read, Coach Weis can certainly be demanding with his players, but Mangino appeared to cross the line into abusive behavior.

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Ben Kliewer 2 years ago

I'll repeat what I said a few years back. I played college football, and bear crawls on hot turf are nothing out of the ordinary for football coaches. And I didn't play for Mangino or at Kansas. There's nothing cruel or exotic about it, and anyone who says it is has never played football.

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ckjayhawk 2 years ago

There is a difference between trying to find out what motivates each player (one of the hallmarks of a good coach) and setting out to humiliate your players (which is what I think it became with Mangino).

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Patrick Leiker 2 years ago

If Weis loses complete control of his team and they revolt again him, he will be fired too.

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KGphoto 2 years ago

Are you really blaming a witch hunt for 7 straight losses? That goes against logic. The players play the game. If they liked Mangino, wouldn't they have played harder to make sure he WASN'T fired?

Please explain how negative coach publicity would make them want to quit.

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741hawk 2 years ago

Please note: Mangino did not lose control (and the team was playing well) UNTIL Lew held a totally inappropriate players-only meeting (that means without the coach), thus undercutting and destroying the authority of his own coach. It was unavoidably downhill from there.

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KFoz 2 years ago

Maybe it has been so long that I can't remember; what was Mangino's record at KU and, more specifically, his Big 12 record?

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Keith Hummel 2 years ago

Overall, his record was 50-48. In the Big-12, his record was 23-41. Here is the breakdown by year:

YrOverallConf
20022-100-8
20036-73-5
20044-72-6
20057-53-5
20066-63-5
200712-17-1
20088-54-4
20095-71-7
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jhox 2 years ago

I find it amazing how polarizing the Mangino issue is with the Jayhawk faithful. I'm very thankful to him for giving me a trip to the Orange Bowl, and for the most part I believe he did a very good job here. I'm by and large a Mangino fan.

That being said, let's be honest, those players' complaints would not have gotten him fired if the wheels hadn't fallen off the program his last season. That 1 conference win is what did him in, not the complaints of a few players. The player treatment issue was just a conventient excuse to get rid of a guy who had quit recruiting. I don't know if he was confident a higher profile program was going to offer him a job or what, but he and his staff quit finding those undervalued players like Reesing, Talib and Meyer.

Also, can you imagine how crippled he would have been as a recruiter had he stayed, after the player treatment concerns became public? What kid would want to play for someone with that reputation? What parent would want their kid to play for someone who makes someone bear crawl on hot turf until their hands are blistered?

We can blame Lew for picking the wrong guy to replace him, but to this day I believe Lew had no choice pulling the trigger to get rid of Mangino. It simply had to be done. While I felt a bit sorry for Mangino, and part of me believes he deserved better, this is a performance based business. One and seven in the conference didn't cut it, and his chances of being a good recruiter were crippled by the player mistreatment publicity. It is as simple as that. Fans seem to be in one corner or the other on the topic of Mangino, and it wasn't as black and white as most people seem to think.

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NebraskaJayhawk 2 years ago

I'm not pointing fingers, but it would have made a huge difference had the media supported him instead of the players.

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Eric Mitchell 2 years ago

I'm just glad Arist Wright isn't on this team to complain.

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Dan Pawlowski 2 years ago

OMG. I hope he isn't mean to them. ;)

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Bangkok_Jayhawk 2 years ago

Lets just make sure we run Weis out of town AFTER he wins 3 bowls in 4 seasons. :)

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Bangkok_Jayhawk 2 years ago

I am THRILLED that we have Crist... That being said, I wonder if he wishes he could redo that LSU decision. He probably would have started in a National Championship game.

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squawkhawk 2 years ago

‘What? Are you afraid of competing against (Notre Dame starter Jimmy) Clausen?’

Turns out he was afraid. Lucky break for KU though. We'll see what he is really made of this year.

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jhox 2 years ago

I think his move to Kansas wasn't made out of fear of competing for the ND starting spot. It has more to do with the fact that he wasn't being given a chance to compete for the starting spot at ND. That decision had been made last season.

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Pitthawk34 2 years ago

It will take more than one year. 5 wins his year and I'll be more than happy. Look out TCU something tells me the magic may be in the air. The stadium should be rockin. My tickets arealready bought.

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jhawkrulz 2 years ago

Too much time clicking on those snorgtee ads?

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Keith Hummel 2 years ago

When the head coach is so dedicated that he occasionally sleeps in his office it sets the tone for the entire team. You see it in the players attitudes this summer. I don't remember a time when there was this much focus and energy and excitement about an upcoming football season at KU, and it all starts with Weis.

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Robert Brock 2 years ago

The last time Weis took off some time to see a movie the film was Lawrence of Arabia.

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clevelandjayhawker 2 years ago

"..... Because I’ll say things to them a lot colder than I will most other people. If they screw up, it’s bad. I mean really bad. As bad as you’ve ever heard it. Just think of the worst you’ve ever heard and go a lot worse than that.”

Out of context, but can Weis rip pinkle a new one for his dumb comments yesterday?

Missery- we always knew you were classy, thanks for having your head coach prove it at your big sec media day, you’re in the right conference

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rockchalk_dpu 2 years ago

You forgot about TJ Moe putting his foot in his mouth saying that the SEC was "average" once you got past 2 teams. Good luck winning 6 games this year.

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clevelandjayhawker 2 years ago

actually I agree with that, maybe they have 3-4 "good teams", but you look at misserys schedule last year or KU's this year and what missery has this year and I think it got easier. The big 12 has 6 top 25 teams this preseason. I want missery to lose as much as the next KU fan, but I think their schedule actually got easier. Also I think if oklahoma state had played in the championship game they would have beaten either bama or lsu...these are just my opinions, too lazy to research haha

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jhox 2 years ago

I agree, cleveland...from top to bottom the Big 12 was the better conference last year than the SEC (or should I say from top to second to the bottom?). I don't know that OSU would have beaten LSU (had they played) but I do believe it it would have been a heck of a match up that could have gone either way. The talking heads on ESPN have the world believing the sun rises and sets on the SEC, and most recent years that's probably been a valid view, but last year it wasn't.

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qringer 2 years ago

It's scary what it takes to be successful. It seams that living a balanced life that has time for family, work, sleep, etc. is out if you want to achieve success. I don't think I could do it, or for that matter would want to.

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nuleafjhawk 2 years ago

I definitely wouldn't do it for the money that I make right now.

For Charlies salary.......I think my family would gladly sacrifice some quality time with me.

In fact - for that kind of money, they would encourage it !!!

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Robert Brown 2 years ago

We are just a few weeks from seeing if the new culture will translate to improved performance on the field. The bar is set pretty low. I'm setting an over under at 4.5. I'll take the under with the deciding game being at NIU. If KU can win that game, I think they could pull out five wins which would be successful. If they win 3-4 games and are competitive in the other games, they will have been sucessful in my book.

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thjhawk 2 years ago

This maybe a bit off subject but what the heck.....Everyone is sick and saddened by the whole Penn State situation. There is talk that if PSU gets the death penalty that current players would be able to leave and immediately be elgiable to play at another school. Question....do you think coach is keeping a close eye on this situation and do you think it would be possible to atract some of these transfering athletes?.....Just a thought.

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DocBean 2 years ago

every coach in the country is watching and waiting for the Penn State penalty. If they get a death penalty, chances are it won't take effect until next year. Schedules are set this year, and games are coming up, it's going to be too hard for students to transfer and play this year, and too hard for the PSU opponents to find other games to fill out their schedules.

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NebraskaJayhawk 2 years ago

What Doc says is true, but that is a great post, thjhawk. And you can bet that he is already looking to next year's possible transfers if this does happen. As much as I like Weis and the way he conducts himself, this year is huge as far as recruiting goes. Kansas needs a 5-6 win season to get the media (sports center) behind Weis. If that happens, watch out.

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squawkhawk 2 years ago

LOL, 5-6 is winning all the patsy games and 2 league games.

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NebraskaJayhawk 2 years ago

To win six games they're going to have to beat a couple of pretty good teams.

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rockchalk_dpu 2 years ago

I would like to think that KU fans would take their lumps and accept that the man they put so much faith in had misled them, but I also don't think that is likely to happen with a Bill Self-type coach. I also think that the rest of the staff and university are much stronger than PSU was in that Zenger doesn't seem to take crap regardless who it comes from, and GBL has already overseen running off a fairly successful football coach for much much less (though still serious issues) which gives me faith that the powers that be would never let such a cover-up take place, or let someone be in the position that they could do something similar or similarly egregious.

Hopefully we never have to find out though.

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Fototherapist 2 years ago

After Gill was fired I said I want the biggest, fattest, meanest head football coach we could find. Heck, I would have been fine with getting Mangino back. So far, I think Weis has exceeded my expectations.

1

clevelandjayhawker 2 years ago

who is Foto? and why are you a rapist?

4

nuleafjhawk 2 years ago

will you please send me money for a new keyboard? it doesn't work well with coffee all over it.

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KGphoto 2 years ago

Never too early for Sean Connery, Jeopardy humor.

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nuleafjhawk 2 years ago

lol - i wanted to link to some of those clips, but most of them would be taken down anyway. But they were very, very funny! Thanks for the reminder.

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John Dalke 2 years ago

If he is such a motivational genius, why didn't things work out at Notre Dame?

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peter56321 2 years ago

Weiss has said he believes that his big mistake at Notre Dame was that he didn't pay enough attention to making sure there was good chemistry among his coaching staff. He implied there was some dysfunction among and between the various coaches and not everybody was on the same page. The results played out on the field. He added that he believes he's fixed that problem at Kansas.

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Jeff Suther 2 years ago

I would argue that he didnt fail at ND. 2 BCS bowl apperances. Had a bad 3i win season but then followed it by getting back to winning 7 and 8 games. Think the admin. Just didnt like him. I do agree ND will never get back to where they were for the exact reasons you mentioned.

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mdlund0 2 years ago

Since I was at Notre Dame for the duration of Charlie's tenure, I'd be happy to answer that. The man can definitely recruit. He can definitely motivate. And he can certainly develop unique schemes and game plans - in that, he is an undeniable genius. The one thing he can't do is develop players (and I'm not sure that that problem has been resolved). In the NFL he was/is successful because the players are professional, already developed players. In college, to be a successful head coach in the long term, you must possess the ability to turn high school players into professional players. It's a huge transition for the kids, and few people can do it while doing everything else too (Think Urban Meyer, Nick Saban, and Pete Carrol). If you look at Notre Dame football, Charlie's predicessor, Tyrone Willingham, had that ability while lacking the ability to come up with schemes and game plans. Charlie's enormous success in his first years at Notre Dame came because Willingham previous work filled in the gaps in Weis' talent. As Willingham's recruits faded away, Weis was left with a large amount of undeveloped talent (often to 10 recruiting classes) that couldn't properly execute at critical times. Eventually, the mediocrity that resulted reached critical mass (Notre Dame will not tolerate 6-6 seasons, losses to Navy, and back-to-back-to-back-to-back losses against USC for long).

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NebraskaJayhawk 2 years ago

I hope you are wrong about him not being able to develop talent. I guess time will tell.

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FightnMangino64 2 years ago

Dont worry Head Coaches arent the ones that develop the talent the position coaches are

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Kirk 2 years ago

My sense is that Weis has learned to delegate the things that he's not best at doing himself. Time will tell. The first year is likely to be bumpy, though I think KU is going to pull a few upsets. Year two could be bumpy, too.

Success will come from sticking it out and making adjustments in the areas we need to, and building on what works. So far, I think Weis has done a helluva job.

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KGphoto 2 years ago

Where have you been? Notre Dame hasn't won a title in 24 years. The one year that really mucked up Weis' record was the year after he lost eleven (11) players in the draft, including the record breaking Brady Quinn. Weis' inherited Notre Dame on a 7 game bowl skid. He made two BCS bowls and broke the skid a year later.

When Weis took over at ND, Lou Holtz was the only coach since 1980 to finish with over a .583 win %. Brian Kelly is now at .61%

You must be thinking of the Knute Rockne, Frank Leahy or Ara Parseghian Irish, because they just aren't that good anymore.

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ClemsonDandy 2 years ago

You know who else could push buttons? Jerry Sandusky. The question is, how long will it be before we'll be reading about Weis cornholing somebody in his makeshift bedroom?

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clevelandjayhawker 2 years ago

you must have a lot of time on your hands to make multiple accounts....what a dumb comment and dumb to hit the like button to your own comment twice. now i dislike clemson

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ClemsonDandy 2 years ago

Sure. That would take quite a bit of time, wouldn't it?

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ClemsonDandy 2 years ago

This comment was removed by the site staff for violation of the usage agreement.

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mdlund0 2 years ago

This comment was removed by the site staff for violation of the usage agreement.

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ClemsonDandy 2 years ago

This comment was removed by the site staff for violation of the usage agreement.

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bville_hawk 2 years ago

Well, depraved, yeah. But how do you figure poorly-raised???

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milehighhawk 2 years ago

Hyphenating a word ending in -ly? Amateur hour at Clemson.

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KGphoto 2 years ago

Somebody bury ClemsonDandy in southern ground, stat!

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oldalum 2 years ago

A removed comment is like an unopened Christmas present. I always wish I knew what was in it.

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Ron Prichard 2 years ago

Why didn't you open your Christmas presents?

But I second your thought.

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Micky Baker 2 years ago

It sounds like Weis might be a better coach than he was at ND. He had some time to push some buttons at Arrowhead with those offensive players that out performed their own skill level. If this converts to the field on game day at Kansas, I think it's going to be an exciting season to say the least.

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Ron Prichard 2 years ago

Or we could go with this one if you like the black helmets. It might pose a problem matching the uniforms, though.

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nuleafjhawk 2 years ago

Let's talk to whoever designed Baylor's uniforms last year. It seemed to work for them. I'm sure it had nothing to do with RG3.

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april28 2 years ago

Black uni's with royal and red would be completely awesome.

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april28 2 years ago

Best helmet ever. I've said it before. I'll buy beers for everyone if they come out in these this year.

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jhawkrulz 2 years ago

Put the "mean jayhawk" (1941) on there and I like it.

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KGphoto 2 years ago

I like the mean hawk too. It would be AWESOME with that helmet!

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JHAWKSWAG 2 years ago

I liked those unis we rocked in the border war a few years back against misery

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jhawkrulz 2 years ago

I always thought T. Wilingham was too defensive minded. He was successful, but never could score points. I thought C. Weis (at ND) was too offensive minded, and the two early years mixed the Ty and Charlie and had successful BCS bowl appearances. As time drifted on the coaching problems escalated, not because HCCW couldn't develop talent, he just wasn't focused on the defense. They scored a lot of points, they just didn't stop anyone. With that in mind, the most critical thing that I thought that needed to occur for the success of KU football (not sure if that is an oxymoron currently), was the selection of a Defensive coordinator. I think we have something solid there, and that is what will make us successful in the long run.

I always thought that when they brought in Charlie Weis at ND if he Ty Wilingham as his DC the team would have been unstoppable.

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mdlund0 2 years ago

With a top 10 recruiting class nearly every year he recruited for Notre Dame, how many of Charlie's recruits eventually went in the first round of the NFL draft? How many were even drafted at all? I'll agree with you that he was too offensive minded, but even his offenses suffered after a while. Why? A structure will not stand long on a poor foundation, and without player development, you have no foundation.

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jhawkrulz 2 years ago

Agree: 2004 was the last year TW coached, and then CW took over. It was surprising when I looked at it from your thought how much Defensive players were taken.

Year # of Picks (round of picks) how many offensive and how many defensive players. 2004-5 picks (2-2-4-6-6) 1-O, 4-D 2005-2 (3-5) 1-O, 1-D 2006-3 (2-3-6) 3-O 2007-7 (1-2-3-5-6-7-7) 3-O 4-D 2008-4 (2-2-3-6) 2-O 2-D 2009-1 (4) 1-D 2010-4 (2-2-6-6) 4-O 2011-1 (2) 1-O 2012-4 (1-1-5-5) 1-O 3-D

ND had 31 picks during that timeframe, in reference OU -50 Ohio State - 57 Texas-42 Florida-40 Michigan-33 KU-9 KSU-13

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Mike Hart 2 years ago

Mdlund0: "... A structure will not stand long on a poor foundation, and without player development, you have no foundation". Gee thanks... That's so intuitive and deeply enlightening. Why not break out alternate analogies: player development is the oar that propels the boat... The pedals that power the bike... One of the legs to a stool without which... The stool falls over. So what?!?

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machinegun 2 years ago

When our team goes 0-9 in conference, somebody needs to light a fire! That somebody is Coach Charlie Weis!

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DocPossum 2 years ago

Weis and his coaching staff have experience in with what works and what does not work. OJT doesn't work at ND (see Brennan, Devore, Faust, Davie, etc). You must have head coaching experience to have a chance at success there. Weis' time at ND has resulted in his evolution into a head coach. His successes at ND have been noted above. Recruiting, offensive scheme, motivating, player loyalty, honesty, interest in academic success of athletes, doing things the right way, etc. The lack of success also has been well documented; distractions early on as he stayed with Pats during a Superbowl Run, which resulted in hiring good assistants, based on advice, that did not / could not work together (three DCs in Weis tenure). Also Willingham did not recruit enough OLs, so along with Superbowl distraction the OL cupboard was bare beyond those who started for TW. With the D unable to stop critical drives and the young OL on the field too long, ND lost a number of games in the fourth Q, especially during Weis' last two years at ND.
Charlie has learned his head coaching lessons the hard way (as have other members of his staff). His time spent away from ND was not spent idly. He didn't have to work, as ND is still probably paying him. But he was driven to continue to develop, learn, and evolve. He like the rest of his coaching staff, including the strength coach, have a burning desire for excellence. Excellence in all aspects of the program. You can see this in every thing he and his staff does as he rebuilds the KU football program. His hiring the right strength coach will help in the fourth quarter, his hiring a coaching staff that has experience in working together and/or having the same work ethic and values fixes the poor mix he had at ND, the reputation of your coaches will help open doors in high Schools across the country, and his stressing of academics and doing things the right way will resonate with many mommas across the country. KU has much to offer. It has to be packaged correctly to impact recruiting, Weis, Iannello, etal get it. The KU program will not be for everyone, as unfortunately many teens and families are seeking bright lights rather than excellence. Wins will come once everything gets fixed. Your current condition did not happen overnight so the wins will not likely happen overnight. But I can assure you that no head coach in the country will outwork Charlie in his pursuit of excellence for the KU program. The wins will follow.

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Lucas Town 2 years ago

I apologize to everyone on this board but I am going to be a little less optimistic about Weis. Anyone who thinks his previous college coaching record and where he has been is anything to be impressed with...I am just not on board yet. Led ND to their worst season in school history. Florida sucked last year. I have friends and family who are K-State fans and they feel the same way about their basketball coach as I do about Weis. He was the clean hire with no baggage. ND was on a 7 game skid when Weis took over. KU on a 10 game skid, I think this program is a long way (serveral years) from being something I can be proud of.

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