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Friday, April 10, 2009

KU fans: What you post on Facebook could lead to NCAA rules violations for Jayhawks

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— College sports fans, be careful of the company you keep on Facebook.

You might get yourself — and the program you support — in trouble.

That was the lesson this week for Taylor Moseley, a North Carolina State freshman who expressed a common-enough opinion on campus when he started the Facebook group called “John Wall PLEASE come to NC STATE!!!!”

More than 700 people signed up for the group encouraging Wall — a local standout and the nation’s No. 1 basketball recruit — to pick the Wolfpack by national signing day next week.

But the NCAA says such sites, and dozens more like them wooing Wall and other top recruits, violate its rules. More than just cheerleading boards, the NCAA says the sites are an attempt to influence the college choice of a recruit.

Moseley got a cease and desist letter from N.C. State’s compliance director, Michelle Lee, warning of “further action” if he failed to comply. In an interview Friday, Lee said that people who act as boosters but fail to follow recruiting guidelines could face penalties such as being denied tickets or even being formally “disassociated” from the athletic program.

Adam Kissel, director of the Individual Rights Defense Program at the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, said the NCAA can impose rules on its member colleges. But universities — especially public ones — can’t enforce them if it means punishing students in any way for expressing an opinion.

“A student doesn’t lose First Amendment rights because of a contract the university signs with (the NCAA),” he said.

Moseley, the student, didn’t respond to a request for comment, but the group has been renamed “Bring a National Title back to NC STATE!” and features a photo of Wall.

Though Lee sent Mosley the tough warning, even she finds the rule exasperating. The NCAA, she says, simply isn’t keeping up with the technology reality.

“I think nationally the NCAA needs to address further Facebook and how these groups play a part in recruiting,” she said. “Is it realistic for us to be able to monitor them? What harm is a group like this causing? But as the legislation stands right now, this is the position we have to take.”

NCAA spokesman Erik Christianson said the group considers its rules “technology neutral.” A Facebook page is simply a high-tech way to try to influence recruits.

The NCAA’s concern is “intrusions into a high school student’s life when they’re trying to decide where to go to college,” he said. He said the NCAA is keeping up with technology, noting new rules on text-messaging from coaches.

Christianson said the NCAA expects institutions to act as N.C. State did, reaching out to the creators of such groups to “educate” them about the rules. He added he was not aware the NCAA had ever initiated any action related to a Facebook group or notified an institution about one.

But dozens of Facebook groups are still up in plain site for current recruits, including Wall, and other top undecided basketball players such as Xavier Henry and Lance Stephenson.

Wall, a 6-4 playmaker, averaged 21 points, seven rebounds and nine assists for Raleigh Word of God this past season. He’s the No. 1-ranked recruit in the country by both Rivals.com and Scout.com, and among the last top players yet to commit. A Facebook search reveals groups including “Bring John Wall to Baylor,” “John Wall Belongs at UNC” and “John Wall, come to DUKE!!”

There are at least four groups encouraging Wall to pick Kentucky. Through an athletic department spokesman, UK head of compliance Sandy Bell declined to comment on whether the department has taken any action in response to such groups.

Facebook did not respond to an e-mailed request for comment.

Kissel, of the education rights group, and Aden Fine of the American Civil Liberties Union, said that while the NCAA — a private entity — could pursue sanctions against a student like Moseley (such as denying him access to an entirely NCAA-run event), it was troubling that the letter and threatened sanction came from the university.

“The school is potentially finding themselves in a tricky situation, because of the NCAA rules, but that doesn’t mean public universities can censor lawful speech,” Fine said.

Christianson dismissed the free speech argument, saying courts have upheld the NCAA’s right to set recruiting rules for members.

“We don’t see it as a free speech issue. What we do see it as is a recruiting issue,” he said. “We want to be sure that we limit that level of intrusion that comes into their lives.”

Comments

stravinsky 10 years, 9 months ago

The NCAA sucks. This is completely ridiculous. Here's my favorite part...

“We don’t see it as a free speech issue. What we do see it as is a recruiting issue,” he said. “We want to be sure that we limit that level of intrusion that comes into their lives.”

Bogus. Facebook is as much of an intrusion as you want it to be, it's not sending its spindly little technological tentacles down into John Wall's house to get him. If he wants to log onto facebook and boost his ego by how many facebook groups want him, go for it. If he doesn't feel like being harassed, then facebook is probably a bad option anyways.

More evidence that the NCAA rules committee is completely out of touch with reality.

Eric Williams 10 years, 9 months ago

Don't they have to prove that the Facebook group moderators were operating under the command of the University?

If I write a blog about college recruiting that happens to be about how well X would fit in at KU, is that a violation?

If I spraypaint/chalk a sidewalk, is that a violation?

This is ridiculous.

justanotherfan 10 years, 9 months ago

Just another example of how out of control the NCAA's bureaucracy has gotten.

Ben Kane 10 years, 9 months ago

This is worse than KU going after T-shirts they don't like.

Brian Powell 10 years, 9 months ago

BS.

If I didn't learn anything else in my Higher Ed. Law class, it's that you don't mess with Free Speech---especially in higher education contexts.

"Christianson dismissed the free speech argument, saying courts have upheld the NCAA’s right to set recruiting rules for members."
Courts may uphold the right of the NCAA to impose regulations on their 'member' (the institutions, athletic program, staff), they will not uphold that 'member' sanctioning or threatening to sanction a student who is exercising their personal right to free speech--whether that speech violates the NCAA/university policy or not.

Other good reasons: - the student is not acting on the behalf of the institution - the student, by simple naming the facebook group, is not directly 'influencing the decision of the recruit' and not directly communicating to Wall.

[[NCAA spokesman Erik Christianson said the group considers its rules “technology neutral.” A Facebook page is simply a high-tech way to try to influence recruits.]]

Again, it IS all about the technology. He is not an agent of NC State and he is not in direct communication with Wall. If he put that same sign in Wall's front yard, sure -- then he is trying to influence. But he's still not an agent of NC State.

[[The NCAA’s concern is “intrusions into a high school student’s life when they’re trying to decide where to go to college,” he said. He said the NCAA is keeping up with technology, noting new rules on text-messaging from coaches.]]

My case in point, LOL. He's comparing texts from coaches (agent of the school in direct communication to the recruit) with the title of a public facebook group (non agent, indirect-at-best communication).
The facebook group is like if I stood on the side of the street in XYZ town with a sign that said 'John Wall, come to KU!'.

I suggest he reads The Law of Higher Education before he gets sued: http://www.amazon.com/Law-Higher-Education-Comprehensive-Administrative/dp/0787900524

Just visit this site and see how many Universities lose cases regarding the First Amendment: http://www.thefire.org/index.php/topic/11

Kevin Holt 10 years, 9 months ago

Great move.
No Common sense Allowed Association

kufankam 10 years, 9 months ago

oh man... the other day, i saw Xavier around town and i happen to be wearing a KU shirt. i simply said, "hey X, nice game the other night". he smiled, said, "thanks". i didn't think anything of it, but maybe KU should "self report" this to the NCAA before it gets found out?! i mean, i didn't mean anything by it, i was just being curtious... we have really got to think about this kind of stuff.

c'mon NCAA, are you serious?! stop putting energy toward fans on facebook and start investigating how D1 athletes come from low income situations and then all of a sudden are driving $40,000 cars. THAT seems like something to look into, no?

tippy 10 years, 9 months ago

So if I start the group "John Wall, please come to Duke" will I get Duke in trouble?

This is just stupid.

timecronk 10 years, 9 months ago

If this were upheld, what would stop students from pretending to be from other universities and creating fake groups in order to try to get NCAA sanctions handed down on their rivals?

Lance Hobson 10 years, 9 months ago

I'm starting a "Bring John Wall to UK" group now. I hope they don't "dissassociate" me from the bball program. Isn't that what they did to Billy Gillespie?

WisconsinJayhawk 10 years, 9 months ago

Sorry, Associated Press, LJW, KUSports.com, et. al: I broke this story right here on the KU message boards nine days ago:

http://boards.kusports.com/showflat.php?Cat=0&Number=1378604&an=0&page=14#1378604

Pulitzer, please.

truefan 10 years, 9 months ago

Everyone should go on to facebook right now and start groups that plead for recruits to go to Missouri. It's a win, win. The recruits won't actually go there because Missouri sucks, and Missouri will get sanctioned for the recruiting violation and be banned from the tournament...NICE!

Craig Lang 10 years, 9 months ago

So if I, a Kansas fan and alumni, create a Facebook page encouraging Wall to go to Duke, could I get Coach K in trouble with the NCAA?

Just a thought.

Rick Arnoldy 10 years, 9 months ago

Absolutely, off the wall, stupid. Times are changing. Apparently the white shirt, tie wearing, NCAA isn't. We can't express our own free speech rights to encourage a player to attend our school? How the H will this stand up in higher court?

rcaltrider 10 years, 9 months ago

This may quite possibly be the dumbest thing I have heard or read about in a long, long time, if not ever!! Get a life NCAA geezers!

Jack Wilson 10 years, 9 months ago

John Wall, Xavier Henry, Lance Stephenson -- Come to KU!! Send me a cease and desist letter and you'll see where it gets shoved.

brooksmd 10 years, 9 months ago

Oh geez, back before Greg Monroe signed with Georgetown, I was talking to his mom at work and I had my Jayhawk pin on my employee id badge. Should I report that?

Tuskin 10 years, 9 months ago

John Wall, Xavier Henry, Lance Stephenson, and every other recruit still out there -- Come to KU!!!

NCAA -- Give me cause and legal standing to become a millionaire off you!!!

BCRavenJHawkfan 10 years, 9 months ago

Obviously everyone that posts here is on the same page of this.

The one thing that is never addressed is, where is the recruit's responsibility in this? I am surprised the NCAA isn't trying to regulate what the parents of these kids can say.

You know just a few weeks ago Miles Brand was on 60 minutes. No wonder Bob Knight could not get along with him, what a dweeb.

sdoyel 10 years, 9 months ago

This is the most ridiculous thing I've heard all week.... Hey NCAA how about instead of checking facebook you deal with more important things. Like feeding the homeless?

RckChalkJeff 10 years, 9 months ago

Everyone come visit my "John Wall for MethZoo" page

jaybate 10 years, 9 months ago

jaybate comedy news service:

Unreliable sources indicate that the NCAA is investigating itself for unconstitutional harrassment of students posting about John Wall.

Apparently the NCAA sent one of its crack investigators under cover into its own office and, despite everyone in the office knowing exactly who the undercover investigator was, he still reputedly caught/entrapped as yet unnamed officials of the NCAA in the act of harrassing students in the Wall situation.

Unreliable sources indicate that media representatives for the NCAA first flatly denied the report, then shrugged about it, and then finally said, "It is what it is, but we are not yet sure what it is, nor can we be sure that we will ever be sure. But it is important for everyone to remember that we have the best interests of amateur athletics in mind no matter what is discovered."

Unreliable sources also report that John Stewart of the Daily Show has been seen with a camera crew at NCAA headquarters.

Still more unreliable resources indicate Michael Moore has begun filming his next picture at NCAA headquarters to be called "Stupid White Sports Organizations."

Mainstream media continue to find the story too hot to handle.

Unreliable sources report Gary Bedore reputedly said, "A reporter gets too close to this story and its like Lisa Guerrero getting too close to an event horizon. The reporter just disappears into a black hole."

Developing...

(Again, all entirely a comedy schtick.)

jaybate 10 years, 9 months ago

drgnslayr,

Wish it were true that everyone has a right to free speech, but that is so 20th Century as the kids say.

Frankly, it is not clear at all what is and isn't protected free speech any more.

The Patriot Acts and the Military Commissions Act, plus a variety of regulations equivocating whether free speech is protected on the internet, plus the government's need to manage the internet to manufacture the kind of conscent it needs to continue in control of the country, plus the NSA's desire to eavesdrop on every thing on the internet in real time, means what happens on Facebook and on the internet generally is not necessarily protected by what is left, after the Bush Administration, of the First Amendment.

Also Facebook itself is something many in the government feel compelled to control.

I had it explained to me this way once. When these social networking sites have 100-200 million users, it means they are getting to be the size of nation states. This scale of online culture becomes an entity that can deliver enormous political influence on the quaint old representative forms of government that so many authoritarian neocons and neolibs already want to sharply curtail. Hence, government is reputedly aching for precedent setting cases to curb the rights of speech by any means handy with in them.

As Chris Rock might say, "Not talkin' 'bout free speech, talkin' bout enslaved speech."

Tony Bandle 10 years, 9 months ago

None of us should be surprised by the heights of insanity these fools can climb to, or the depths of greed and deceit that they can fall. The NCAA is a money machine with absolutely zero concern for the "student athlete" and even less for the fans that support the system.

NCAA - Not Caring At All NCAA - No Commandment Allowed Amnesty NCAA - No Conscience All Acrimony NCAA - Notoriously Criminal Action Avoiders NCAA - National Cash Acquiring Association

and my favorite...

NCAA - Nutty Crusty Aged A++H+++S

Eurekahwk 10 years, 9 months ago

As a student, yes you ARE an agent of the university. You are as much a booster as the boosters. Afterall, your tuition dollars are keeping the place going. The Facebook ruling stinks, but it is justifiable to hold all members of the university accountable.

So do the university a favor: If you know an adolescent prodigal athlete, please don't try to influence his decision. It may very well be a recruiting violation.

KUGreenMachine 10 years, 9 months ago

There is a reason why schools like NC State and Kentucky have myspace & facebook pages to get new recuits and that reason is that they are not KU. If we get bad enough that we try and beg recruits to come here using facebook, that will be a sad day in Jayhawkland. Recruits come to KU because of the history & tradition and the yearly battle for #1 in the nation. Directing this title at KU fans is wrong as it does not apply.

rockchalkjayhawk4ku11 10 years, 9 months ago

Ok instead of a "JOHN WALL go to DUKE" group, let's make a "JOHN WALL go to MIZZOU!" Let's see if we can get Missouri in some trouble.

milwaukeeJAYHAWK 10 years, 9 months ago

seriously, NCAA. you could be working harder at, I dunno, investigating real things like whatever went (and probably currently goes) down at USC.

going after a student's facebook group smacks of somebody with too much time on their hands and a diluted imagination.

Tim Orel 10 years, 9 months ago

One thing only touched upon - John Wall has to choose to go to the site. Or to search for his name. There's nothing that was stated about any emails sent to him or other efforts to contact him. That to me is a world of difference between a University actively trying to sway his opinion by contacting him and emailing/texting him and students or fans with no affiliation just putting out their opinions without sending him contacts. Sure people can try and be "friends" with him, but he doesn't have to accept and he probably wouldn't just accept all invitations. If students are trying to pursuade him, I'd be willing to bet there are people masquerading in order to cause problems just as often as there are real boosters/fans.

The NCAA should hire a few of these students to understand what students - those they claim to be protecting, are actually all about. They've got a lot to learn.

Trey Hohman 10 years, 9 months ago

Connivance in the name of the twisted game for the NCAA and this so-called rampant criminality oozing from the bowels of us fanatics….I’m certain it won’t be long before the NCAA will be hanging someone. Most likely some back-alley amusers with no affiliation will stand there convicted varyingly of lewdness, jackrolling, sneak-thievery, Chloral-hydrating, sodomy, strangulation, and enthusiastic corruption of the public good. Yikes.

Mike Crosbie 10 years, 9 months ago

A lesson to all who think that free speech is at issue here, you all must be young or not very informed regarding the NCAA.

The NCAA is a private organization whose member schools CHOOSE to be a member of. Many schools, people, organizations have tried to sue the NCAA based on Constitutional grounds and every time the courts have ruled that as a private organization, their rules trump the US Constitution, as is the case with any private organization who has members that CHOOSE to belong.

If a member of a private organization doesn't like the rules of the private organization then they have 2 options:

1- Work with other members to change the rules 2- Withdraw membership of the organization (and possibly create a new competing organization with other disgruntled ex members)

Having said that.... To Xavier and Lance: 2 scholorships just opened up, we have room for BOTH of you now !!! (as if they will see this, not)

Michael Auchard 10 years, 9 months ago

Having read all of the points above... the NCAA is backwards. 18 year-old students are not agents of a university. They're not paid, they're not briefed in any sort of training course for this "job," and they shouldn't be expected to not root for their team. Some of these young people don't even know what their major field of study is going to be; some, no doubt, barely know their way to the library. I really wish the NCAA would own up to its own incompetence for once instead of dumping it on students and student athletes. Calipari associates with apparent criminals, USC runs a scandal circus and this is what they care about. Ridiculous.

kuhawksr1 10 years, 9 months ago

NOTICE TO ANY TOP 50 RECRUIT CONSIDERING KU:

Great place to be. If you perform, you'll be a star and have the opportunity to make big money in the league. Lawrence is a great town ... many "perks". KU has great tradition. PLEASE COME TO KU! Have a PayPal account??

[end]

Now ... KUSports.com can officially be investigated by the NCAA for recruiting violations. Call me.

bigjay83 10 years, 9 months ago

Memo to Jaybate:

As a general rule when writing a "comedy schtick" it is usually helpful to include at least some comedy. Whether it's literal, ironic, sarcastic, black, blue, observational, or surreal comedy, it's usually a good idea for said comedy to contain something of what the layman might call "funny."

Also, there is no need to classify what you have written as a "comedy schtick" within the writing piece itself. The audience has a knack for deciding on it's own what is and is not actually comedy.

Calling a large brown log of canine feces a work of Mozart does not, in all actuality, make it so.

Please take under advisement for future work.

Sincerely,

bigjay83

rockingthechalk 10 years, 9 months ago

Hahaha...... bigjay83, now THAT is funny!!

jaybate 10 years, 9 months ago

bigjay83,

Ouch! You're too clever for me. ;-)

FWIW, I have learned to make clear when I am making jokes and opining on the internet for a variety of reasons. If you don't know why yet, as Yoda said, you will.

truefan 10 years, 9 months ago

I don't think Free Speech is being jeopardized, I just think it is impossible for the NCAA to police these things. It is rediculous to try and police which student/fan goes or went to or roots for which team. Maybe I am a Mizzou fan that happens to go to Kansas and therefore I set up a Facebook group incouraging players to play at Mizzou. Who would the NCAA cite for the issue? KU for allowing me to put up the group, or Mizzou for having a group up that pleads for a recruit to play for them? It is absolutely the dumbest thing I have ever heard, and on that note I blame NC State for giving out the cease order. Notice, the NCAA did not send out the order, nor did they tell NC State to send out the order. In this case the NCAA realizes that it would be impossible to police Facebook so therefore they distinguished the difference between recruiting violation and free speech. NC State officials however, are dumb and they need to realize that they cannot possibly police all of these situations because there is nothing stopping me from setting up a group that pleads for John Wall to play for NC State even though I don't go to that school. It would be a free speech issue if they tried to stop me, and I would undoubtedly win in a court battle if they went that route.

Brian Powell 10 years, 9 months ago

Eurekahawk, the student is not acting as an agent of the university as far as the NCAA/University/Recruit issue is concerned.

Regardless, my point was that the U. cannot legally sanction or discipline the student for violating part of the NCAA/University recruitment regulations. Doing so would be restricting speech of the student that is legally protected under the Constitution. The NCAA does not supersede the Constitution.

Facets of the issue: 1. the NCAA sanctions the University 2. the U. sanctions the student Let's not confuse the two.

1 might be legal. #2 would not.

Jaybate -- you'd be surprised what is 'protected' by the Supreme and other high courts in America. Many failed attempts at 'speech codes' and rules against 'hate speech' are documented in the book I linked to.

If the Supreme Court considers racist speech protected, I think they would no problem ruling in favor or a student naming a facebook group (WHICH IS NOT DIRECT COMMUNICATION TO THE RECRUIT) 'hey john wall, come to NC State'.

Brian Powell 10 years, 9 months ago

mcrozb,

Re-read both of my posts above, THEN insult me.

"Facets of the issue: 1. the NCAA sanctions the University 2. the U. sanctions the student Let's not confuse the two."

Obviously, IF the facebook group was a recruiting violation (IF) then the University would not have much ground in court vs. NCAA (you are correct about the U./NCAA relationship as contractual and therefore not a constitional issue).

My point was about NC State sanctioning the student for naming a Facebook group what he named it. That would be a free speech issue. The student has no contractual or private relationship with the NCAA.

Brian Powell 10 years, 9 months ago

Or in case anyone else missed them, two experts from the article itself:


[Adam Kissel, director of the Individual Rights Defense Program at the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, said the NCAA can impose rules on its member colleges. But universities — especially public ones — can’t enforce them if it means punishing students in any way for expressing an opinion.

“A student doesn’t lose First Amendment rights because of a contract the university signs with (the NCAA),” he said.]

[“The school is potentially finding themselves in a tricky situation, because of the NCAA rules, but that doesn’t mean public universities can censor lawful speech,” Fine said.]

LAJayhawk 10 years, 9 months ago

Be clear, the University is not disciplining the individual as a student of the University -- fines or expulsion, etc -- nor are they attempting to remove his right to free speech. The NC State freshman does not HAVE to take down the website. He will not go to jail or face a lawsuit if he doesn't comply. What the University has done is threaten to disallow his association with the basketball team -- i.e. not allow him to buy tickets or attend any events -- which even the ACLU lawyer stated was perfectly within their rights as a member of the private organization that is the National Collegiate Athletic Association.

This may, infact, be an egregiously stupid act and is nearly impossible to fully police, but it is not, in any way, a threat to the individual's right to expression as is defined under the First Amendment to the Constitution of the United States.

The University and the NCAA look like a bunch of d-bags, but they are not doing anything wrong.

bigjay83 10 years, 9 months ago

Yoda, huh, jaybate? One might think comparing oneself to a fictitious 700-year-old, omnipotent Jedi Master with the power to manipulate a force that controls the minds and actions of the Universe might make one seem conceited, narcissistic, and self-righteous, but, well... there you go.

I suppose you are right though. It is important to point out the intentions of an anonymous post on an open message board. I mean the last thing you want to do is open yourself up to anonymous threats of anonymous litigation in imaginary court. That imaginary world's court system is clogged with anonymously frivolous civil suits against anonymous or imaginary defendants.

Much like the case Yoda himself is currently fighting, Darth Maul v. the Force.

A clear cut case of slander if ever I did see one.

LAJayhawk 10 years, 9 months ago

I, of course, meant in my post that the NCAA and the University are not doing anything "legally" or "constitutionally" wrong.

As far as not looking like a major tool chest... suffice to say, they have failed miserably.

CasperCorps 10 years, 9 months ago

Thats awesome.. We need more regulation in our lives. And more taxes too..

Brian Powell 10 years, 9 months ago

LAjayhawk,

I thought I was being pretty clear. I was talking about the University sanctioning the student (they have only threatened to, with the letter, but taking away his ability to attend games or buy tickets would be considered a sanction. One that would not hold up in court due to much precedent. Even threatening to sanction or censor a form of protected speech can be found unlawful under the Constiution, as it produces a "chilling effect" on the freedom speech [words of the judge who wrote the opinion]).

It's the NCAA who might be able to pursue the option to ban the student from NCAA events -- not the University. (Even then, the NCAA is in muddy waters, as it has no contractual/private relationship with the student -- but if they own the sporting events, they probably could.)

You may have misread the quote from the ACLU rep you mentioned:

"Kissel, of the education rights group, and Aden Fine of the American Civil Liberties Union, said that while the NCAA — a private entity — could pursue sanctions against a student like Moseley (such as denying him access to an entirely NCAA-run event), it was troubling that the letter and threatened sanction came from the university."

Again, to be clear: it's my educated opinion that the University would be violating the student's rights by sanctioning the him in this situation -- and based on precedent, the student would win if it went to court.

It's all moot. Just a story during these crazy recruitment times. I just wish people (students and those in authority) had a better handle on their rights and boundaries.... and that the NCAA would get off their ignorant high-horse. The guy was comparing the name of a public facebook group to texts from coaches to recruits! And calling the facebook group its own 'website'. Really.

Tyler Daniels 10 years, 9 months ago

haha, the NCAA is ridiculous. That is all I have to say about this right now...

jayhawkboogeyman 10 years, 9 months ago

This is such crap. These recruits visit big time schools where the students often cheer them during the games they visit; that's not a violation because it is part of an "official visit." But... if Lance Stephenson visits KU, and I, in turn, go blog about it with my friends and say he should come here, then I am somehow committing a violation on behalf of the University? But...if a newspaper blogger is at the same game and writes an article for Sporting News about how well he would fit in if he came here, that is OK, even though a published article is far more likely to reach the recruit than a web page circulating in the Kansas student network? In addition to comments about scamming the system by posing as a fan at another school, it seems like the NCAA is trying to regulate what I can and can't say on my own web page, something that it has positively no moral standing to do, and that it is falsely assuming that I have a relationship with the KU Basketball program. Just because I am a student doesn't mean I am associated with KU Athletics, and since when can a student athletic organization censor what I say on my own behalf to anyone? This would be like punishing KU if a car salesman sent an ad offering a great deal to student athletes, even though the perpetrator has no affiliation with KU. It is his right to offer what ever kind of deal he wants on his own behalf, even if his shop has Jayhawks logos all over it. The same with Facebook; I can say whatever I want on there about a student athlete; where is his responsibility to ignore/regulate what I say. Also, doesn't John Wall already know that, no matter what school he picks, the fans of that school are going to be very excited to have him? It's not like it is news that fans of a team would be excited to get a great new player on that team.

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